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Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980
Page 29
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Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980 - Page 29. July 1980 - August 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 29, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/281.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1980 - August 1980). Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980 - Page 29. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/281

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980 - Page 29, July 1980 - August 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 29, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/281.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date July 1980 - August 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 33 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 29
File Name femin_201109_562ax.jpg
Transcript NETWORK EDITED BY LYNNE MUTCHLER Marking the return home of Texas' favorite daughter, the Texas Women's Political Caucus (TWPC) will host a gala evening August 9 in honor of Sissy Farenthold. This will be one of the highlights of the TWPC's Ninth Annual Convention in San Antonio August 8 through 10, to be held at the St. Anthony Hotel. The opening address (7 p.m. August 8) will be given by Sonia Johnson, recently excommunicated from the Mormon Church for her work on behalf of the ERA. Saturday's luncheon address will be The Family, Public Policy and Women, by Dr. Bambi Cardenas-Ramirez. In addition to exhibits and workshops, there will be several candidates'forums. The Women's Equity Action League is concurrently holding their annual convention, and will participate in all TWPC activities. The two groups will hold separate sessions on Sunday. Registration fee is $25 in advance, $35 at the door. For more information contact TWPC, 815 Brazos, Suite 304, Austin TX 78701. Fuel for Sports/What Kinds and How Much is the topic of a program on nutrition by Dr. Valerie Knotts of Texas Women's University, sponsored by The Sportswoman sports shop, 9131 South Gessner. This program is one of the summertime clinics held at this shop for Houston's sports - minded women The nutrition talk by Dr. Knotts will take place August 2 at 4 p.m. For additional information call 988-5135. Workshop for a Nuclear-free Texas is a free, all- day workshop of the Citizen's Anti-Nuclear Information Team (CANIT) Saturday, July 26, 9:30 a.m. in the Rose Garden at Hermann Park. A map showing many of the 371 sites licensed for nuclear material in Harris County will be on display and a radiation specialist from the Texas Department of Public Health will be available to answer questions. Workshop speakers will be: Andy Sansom, solar homeowner and Associate Director of Texas Energy Extension Services, to speak on the solar alternative; Helen Caldicott, MD, to show a film about Medical Implications of Nuclear Energy; Jim Hightower, former Railrod Commissioner; Peggy Hall, Chair of the Montrose Area National Organization for Women to speak on "what's happening to our gene pool," Ruth Milburn, Chair of Common Cause of Texas, to speak on how to lobby, including discussion of a measure to make Texas the sixth state to ban nuclear plants. There will be solar exhibits, a pro-solar/ anti-nuclear book fair, and two movies will be shown: Nuclear Countdown and The Energy Alternative. For more information, call Ann Wharton of CAN IT, 522-3343. Woman To Woman is holding a discussion on travel from a woman' point of view- 'What it is like to travel alone or travel in foreign countries are some of the topics. The discussion will take place on Wednesday, July 30th at 7:30 p.m. at the Presbyterian Center, 41 Oakdalef off Main Street, behind First Presbyterian Church). Main Street Theater at Autry House will soon move to a new location at 2540 Times in the Rice University Village. Renovation costs of, $75,000 will come fr from foundations and philanthropists. However the theater must be able to demonstrate that they have support from their audience. They are asking for contributions of $50 or more. MST is a non-profit corporation and contributions are tax deductible. A model for the new theater will be on display at Autry House. Currently showing at Autry House is Harold Pinter's Old Times through July 26th. Plays for Children will be offered by the Main Street Theater at Autry House 6265 South Main, Saturday mornings at 11 a.m. through August 23rd. The program, In One Basket, was written by Shirley Pugh and is directed by Charles Harveson. Admission for Children and adults is $2.00. For more information call 524-6706. Call for Articles on Working Women: Southern Exposure magazine is seeking articles, interviews, art and photographs for its forthcoming special issue on working women. This issue will examine the relationship between the status of women and the economic forces in the South in an historical context and in relation to the present work situation. Working Women will focus on those women comprising 80 percent of the female labor force, women who work in clerical, factory, service and sales jobs. These women are for the most part unorganized and not involved in the more middle-class women's movement. The issue will also include material about women in jobs traditionally dominated by men. Over the past few years, a number of grassroots organizing and advocacy projects focused on working women have evolved in the South. These projects have found a void in available materials and resources with which working- class women can identify. Activists, scholars, photographers, poets, oral historians and artists are asked to contribute. Manuscripts should be accompanied by a stamped, self-ad dressed envelope. Deadline for first drafts is October 15. The issue will appear Fall 1981. For more information contact Southern Exposure, Working Women Special Issue, P.O. Box 531, Durham NC 27702. N — fe The Houston Area Women * Center will hold a seminar focusing on both the legal and emoti onal aspects of divorce Saturday, August 9 at the UT School, of Public Health. Attorney Sylvia Roberts will address the 'adversary arrangement' persons find themselves in when disolving the marriage contract. Other workshops will be led by attorneys Mary Bacon, Martina Staple, and Geral- dine Tennant, and counselors Brenda Barker Nancy Gulanick,and Rosemary Vienot. Cost for the seminar is $15. For further information or a registration form, call 7924403. Poet and novelist Marilyn Coffey will be at Breakthrough, on August 8 at 7 p.m. to read selections from her works. Everyone invited. P.D.V.E.D.F.S.V.V.-Prennez du vin et du fro mage si vousvoulez. Novelist and poet Rosemary Danielle will give a reading from her recent work Fatal Flowers on July 29 at the C. G. Jung Educational Institute, 5200 Montrose. Free to the public, the reading will begin at 7:30 p.m. Danielle is the tenth artist to appear on SUM Concerts' continuing Contemporary Writers Series. For further information, call SUM Concerts, 528-6740. A Candlelight March for Justice, a memorial to Fred Paez and other gay men and lesbians who have been victims of violence, will take place at the City Hall Reflection Pool at 7p.m. The marchers will stop at 61 Riesner, and return to City Hall to hear several speakers, keynoted by Rev. Troy Perry and Freda Smith. Everyone is asked to bring a candle which will catch any dripping was( in compliance with a city ordinance). For further information contact the Gay Political Caucaus at 526-2668 First National Conference on Third Wodd Women and Violence sponsored by the Rape Crisis Center of Washington DC, will be held August 21, 22 and 23 in Washington DC. It is a conference for women and men of color. The purpose of the conference is to analyze, strate- gize and provide training about the issue of violence against women. For further information contact, the Rape Crisis Center, PO Box 21005, Washington DC 20009. YWCA The Downtown Branch YWCA needs instructors for adult education and exercise classes and young childrens activities. Anyone interested in part-time work, and willing to attend several training se - sions, may send a resume to: YWCA Downtown Branch, 3515 Allen Parkway, Houston Texas, 77019. In the interesi of changing the median income for women which is now 59 per cent of the median income for men, Volunteers in Public Schools (VIPS) is developing a new program to stimulate the interest of junior high school girls in career alternatives. If you are employed in work not traditionally considered "women's work," VIPS would like you to share your non- traditional work experiences with your younger sisters in HISO Jr. High schools. Beginning in September, VIPS will schedule volunteers to speak to junior high classes, a maximum of two hours per school- visit including your travel time. To volunteer or for further information contact Anna Fisher at VIPS, 11743 North Jfarcia, J*ouston TX 77071. rj * y DHAULAGIRI I American Women's Himalayan Expedition of 1980 (AWHE) has been granted a government permit to climb Dhaulagiri I on the basis of the successful 1978 Women's Expedition to Annapurna. Vera Komarkova, who stood on Annapurna's 26,504 foot summit, is the 1980 leader. This expedition will also conduct physiological and botanical research, and may be the first ascent by the Fear Route, and without using oxygen or Sherpas. (Sherpas are a people from Nepal's Solu Khumbu region adapted to the low oxygen levels of high altitude, and serve ls climbing porters on most expeditions.) Dhaulagiri in Sanskrit means White Mountain; climbers call it Mountain of Storms. The world's sixth highest peak at 26,810 feet (8172 meters), Ohaulagiri looms above the spectacular gorge of the Kali Gandaki, tributary to the Ganges River, in central Nepal. To reach the mountain's base requires a 10-day walk from Pokhara. Villagers of mountainous Nepal can scarcely meet their own needs. Since a three-month supply of food, shelter and gear must be hauled to Base Camp, 100 local porters will be hired-a vital income for remote villages. The ascent requires finding a route past ice falls and avalanches, setting safety ropes to carry food and equipment to camps at six successively higher elevations. Leaving the highest camp before dawn, climbers reach the summit after strenuous ice and rock climbing in the thin air, returning to camp by nightfall. Twenty-eight expeditions attempted Dhaulagiri I between 1810 and 1978. The first ascent was by six members of the third Swiss expedition in 1960. An American, Italian, and two Japanese teams placed a total of seven members and three Sherpas on the summit. Avalanches, falls and frostbite claimed 14 lives. All successful ascents have followed Dhaulagiri's northwest ridge. A first ascent by another route is a coveted prize among international climbers. Organization and fundraising are essential to future success of the AWHE climb. A small team must be selected from many qualified applicants; climber's and porter's equipment, medical supplies, food, radios, etc. must be begged, borrowed or bought, and advance arrangements made for transportation, shipping, permits, fees, insurance and Nepalese personnel. The total costs of the expedition will be about $65,000. ., Contributions made through The American Alpine Club, 113 East 90th Street, Mew York NY 10028 are tax-deductible. Donors of $10 will receive a postcard from base camp. Write to American Women's 1980 Expedition to Dhaulagiri I, P.O. Box 1857 Boulder CO 80306, for further information. danieL boone cycle 5318 CRAWFORD HOUSTON, TEXAS 77004 (713) 526-7011 JULY/AUGUST i