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Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08
Page 28
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 28. July 1980 - August 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/280.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1980 - August 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 28. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/280

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 28, July 1980 - August 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/280.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date July 1980 - August 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 33 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_562aw.jpg
Transcript questions. He learned more by conversation than anyone I knew. He also did formal videotaped interviews many hours long with all three of them. His mastery of the interview form had begun with a Ford Foundation grant in 1964 which allowed him to travel all over the world to interview 30 film directors who had begun to use non-actors in their work. Those with Pier Paolo Pasolini, Albert Maysles, Jean Rouch, Richard Leacock, Satyajit Ray, Shirley Clarke, Cesare Zavat- tini, Peter Watkins, Jean-Luc Godard and Roberto Rossellini, which had been published in Film Comment, Cahiers du Cinema and Objectif, are widely acknowledged as the most useful material available in film courses about them, and there are 20 more to come. He helped me establish the Oral History of the Independent American Cinema here and did extended interviews with documentary filmmakers such as Willard Van Dyke, Robert Gardner, and John Marshall. This collection of historical materials is critical to a field which is just beginning to establish a tutorial tradition. Teacher His teaching ability was almost legendary. Since I first met him, no year went by without his being offered the opportunity to start his own program at one or more other major institutions. Willard Van Dyke, who established the film program at Purchase, said that he was the best teacher of film that he had ever met and David MacDougall, Director of the Film Unit at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies said that he did not think that it was possible to teach film production until he saw James do it so well. His colleague, Brian Henderson, who had been educated at Johns Hopkins, Harvard Law School, and the University of California at Santa Cruz, said that the course that he jointly taught with James Blue was the single most important educational experience that he had had. After James moved north, George Stoney of the Institute of Film and Television at New York University invited him each year to be the lecturer to launch the advanced section of his graduate course in The Documentary Tradition, and Frantisek Daniel, whom he had joined as a founding faculty member of the American Film Institute's Center for Advanced Film Study in Los Angeles in 1969, invited him to lecture each semester in his new graduate program at Columbia University. Last year, under the auspices of The Moving Image/The Maker program of the University-wide Committee on the Arts, he taught at eight campuses within the State University of New York system. He had become a resource for the whole northeast. Education was at the very center of his existence and its core was his commitment to the process of search. When I first met him :>n the day he finished A Few Notes on Jur Food Problem in 1968, he took nre to the Maison des Crepes in Washing- Ion, D.C. and the questioning began. What persuaded him to join me in Houston at that time was the conception that our curriculum in imagemaking would be based on a poem by Robert Graves, and I gave him a copy. In Broken images He is quick, thinking in clear images; I am slow, thinking in broken images. He becomes dull, trusting to his clear images; I become sharp, mistrusting my broken images. ^ Trusting his images, he assumes their relevance; Mistrusting my images, I question their relevance. Assuming their relevance, he assumes the fact- Questioning their relevance, I question the fact. When the fact fails him, he questions his senses; When the fact fails me, I approve my senses. He continues quick and dull in his clear images; I continue slow and sharp in my broken images. He in a new confusion of his understanding; I in a new understanding of my confusion. He always joked about our school of broken images, but I also noted that he soon began to refer to the two doctors' offices which Jean and Dominique deMenil had rented for us on Montrose Boulevard as "the film school." That phrase had an almost religious meaning for him and it was how he referred to the National Film School of Great Britain where he was teaching when he was taken to the hospital some weeks ago. For him, it was a phrase like "the shop" or "the plant" but it was also "the school" where young people would get the training that would enable them to make films that would change the social conditions around the world. It was James Blue who encouraged me to publish Rossellini's last piece of writing, Reflections and Deliberations on Scientific Data to Attempt to Devise an accessible form of Integral Eduction. Its first sentence read: "All the politicians, the moralists, the idealists who sincerely propose to carry out social change must no longer overlook an essential factor: the conception and promotion of new forms of instruction, education and culture." James Blue was completely at home in a large public university with a special commitment to state service, located on the border of another country in a city going through the process of rediscovering and rebuilding itself. He died as the local public television station was holding its auction and I was reminded of Jud's selling his saddle and Curly's selling his gun to bid for the picnic lunch that won the winner the right to (eat lunch' with) the girl in the auction to build the school house in Oklahoma. Aunt Eller: Four-seventy-five, come on gentlemen. Schoolhouse ain't built yet. Got to git a nice chimbley. It was the public television auction of its day, and James Blue, with Rossellini, understood that electronic imagemaking had made of the world a classroom without walls. James Blue's first film for the United States Information Agency, The School at Rincon Santo, documented the building of a school in Colombia. It held the imprint of his hand on its windowpane. The Spirit of the Man I must now inter James Blue [Latin in + terra(\and)]. Like the men of all continents, he "belongs to the land." To place man in his countryside was his own basic operating procedure. His compassion for the rocks in the Algerian cemetery and his celebration of the bricks in the Colombian school drew me to him. I can never be consoled for his loss. I shall transcend my grief by building "a school" in his image, broken though it now is and ever shall be. Amen. Amal. (A fund has been established for the preservation and distribution of the films, writings, and sound recordings of James Blue. Contributions should be made out to the James Blue Memorial Fund and mailed to Media Study/Buffalo, 207 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14202). It was a special pleasure to observe him in conversation with Roberto Rossellini However courteous, he always had a relentless series of questions... He learned more by conversation than anyone I knew. 28 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH