Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980
Page 11
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980 - Page 11. July 1980 - August 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/268.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1980 - August 1980). Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/268

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980 - Page 11, July 1980 - August 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/268.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, July 1980 - August 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date July 1980 - August 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 33 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location Call # HQ1101.B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
File name femin_201109_562ak.jpg
Transcript for Channel 8, there are other alternatives. The Federal Communications Commission can be petitioned to reassign KUHT's frequency to a group that will better serve the Houston area. This takes time, but it can be done. "University of Houston administrators have had 27 years to make Channel 8 a responsible, innovative, visionary station that this city could be proud of," concluded Harrison. "They have failed miserably. It's time to take it away from them." Good stuff, City. Keep it up. It's been a dogfight for the last two years," said KPRC Radio sales manager George Stokes, referring to the battle between his station and KTRH Radio for the afternoon news/ talk-show listening audience in Houston. The latest Arbitron ratings show KPRC ahead in that dog-fight-not because they're doing anything better, necessarily, but because KTRH seems to be doing everything worse. It used to be that most Houstonians who wanted a quick fix on the evening news switched to KTRH. Not any more. Jim Tate and Larry Oldham, a pair of sophomoric clowns, now ride roughshod over the airwaves from 3 to 6 p.m., with what could loosely be termed a talk- show. Their brand of humor would be offensive from a rock-and-roll DJ, but on a news station, it's downright infuriating. (Examples: Dave offered to fix me up with a blind date—you know that's a big girl who sweats a lot ... and now let's go to the traffic report from our favorite lady of the streets . . .) A typical example of their crude, irresponsible style occurred last November, just after the American hostages had been taken in Iran. Tate and Oldham, who had been on the air about three weeks, did a phone interview with Melvin Dewberry, a garage owner. Dewberry had achieved a measure of notoriety by inviting local patriots to sledgehammer a car that an Iranian had left with him to sell. The mindless glee that Tate and Oldham exhibited, and their blatant incitement to violence in a volatile situation, were frightening. "Good for you, Melvin, good for you," they chortled, as Dewberry relived his finest hour. When this reporter called the station to protest, the receptionist laughed and said, "Well, it's funny, ain't it?" Any local news that is grudgingly included in those three hours is treated with scant respect. "I stopped listening to my own news reports," sighed a former KTRH reporter. "It was too painful. I'd knock myself out and then they'd screw it all up." Not surprisingly, KTRH ratings have slipped badly in the 3-7 p.m. time-slot during the last year. With adult males (over 18) the Arbitron ratings (April/May 1979) showed KTRH with a 5.5 share of the listening audience, and 7.7 for adult females. The same period this year shows a 3.2 share of adult males and a 3.7 share of adult females—over a 40 percent drop. KPRC's ratings for the same time period increased from 6.3 to 8.8 for adult males, and showed a slight decrease (5.2 to 4.9) for adult females. Tate and Oldham have blamed the preceding time-slot for their poor showing, claiming they don't have a strong lead-in. That has indeed been a factor. Until several weeks ago, it was their misfortune to follow one of the most mind-numbing programs ever to anesthetize Houston listeners—two "marriage, family and divorce counsellors," sort of Dear Abbies of the Airwaves. Their mission, apparently, was twofold: to refer callers to fellow counsellors and to repeat as often as possible "that all depends where you're com ing from." The listening audience in that time period has decreased over 30 percent in the last year. Interestingly enough, KTRH's best showing in early afternoon over the last three years was in the January/February ratings of 1979, when former women's advocate Nikki Van High tower hosted a two-hour call-in show. Van Hightower was fired the day those ratings came out (they showed a 7.5 share of all metropolitan listeners.) Station manager Hal Kemp called the firing "a programming decision" —the counsellors had been waiting in the wings since January. Van Hightower maintained, as did other station staffers, that her liberal views and gutsy commentaries did not sit kindly with KTRH advertisers. The counsellors were succeeded, in May of this year, by David Fowler, who had been hosting a popular call-in talk show on KPRC. Two months later, he's back at KPRC. "We all make mistakes," Fowler winked in a TV promo for his old-new job. Other staffers are leaving KTRH. The send-in-the-clowns ambience at 510 Lov- ett has apparently taken its toll on two of the station's best news people. Sandra Feldman, longtime City Hall reporter, gave up in early June and joined KPRC TV, with the same City Hall beat. Former morning news editor Velma Cato, most recently acting news director, has also gone to KPRC TV as weekend assignments editor. Cato was offered the job of news director at KTRH before she left. She declined. The latest Arbitron ratings (April/May 1980) show that with males aged 25-54, a prime demographic group, country-and- western station KIKK-FM is number one in the afternoon. KPRC runs second. KTRH doesn't make the top ten. KTRH is the only all-news, information and talk-show radio station in Houston. Since it has abandoned its straightforward afternoon news format in favor of bad taste and bigotry, it has lost a significant percentage of its listeners. One can only hope that the ratings, usually so dear to the hearts bf station managers, will prompt KTRH to get back to the basics of good news reporting and intelligent conversation. The handwriting is on the wall. The All-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, better known as Wimbledon, was the scene (July 5) of probably the most exciting men's finals in its illustrious history. Bjorn Borg beat John McEnroe in the fifth set to win his fifth consecutive Wimbledon victory. It was a real cliff-hanger, television at its best. But, true to form, the NBC commentators, led by Bud Collins, couldn't leave well enough alone. The match was an ordeal, not only for the protagonists, but for Americans as well. We were subjected, via satellite, to a barrage of 'color' guaranteed to make one see red: "Fifty-eight years old, this sporting lady, this great court (the centre court). She's run around with some sporting athletes but there's never been a match like this . . . McEnroe creeps into the Iron Maiden then always escapes . . . This is like King Kong against Godzilla . . . McEnroe has done the Perils of Pauline and then some. . . . Borg, the angelic assassin . . . McEnroe, Harry Houdini in short pants . . . Heart, that's what it's going to take-heart will win this match." The mixed doubles finals came on next at "the big W." One of the NBC commentators remarked that "the golden rule in mixed doubles is—try and intimidate the lady player." After the third variation of that sentiment in five minutes, this viewer had tuned out. w %f^\ Nobody Con Do It LikpYouCan! .. .and if you have a genuine desire to make the most of your abilities, McDonald's is interested in who you are and what you've done. Your experience doesn't have to be in restaurant operation either. If you have a record of accomplishment, regardless of the business, you can become a McDonald's Manager. You'll start by learning to take charge of a million dollar business—a McDonald's Restaurant. You will also start with a salary of $11,000 to $16,000 a year, or more if your qualifications are exceptional. This is the training ground, for we promote from within, and your success as a store manager leads directly to your promotion to corporate management. You can advance to positions such as Multi-Unit Supervisor, Corporate Liaison to our Licensees, or Corporate Management Development and Training Supervisor. We need assertive, ambitious people who aren't afraid of success, so bring us your proven ability to handle people (including teenagers), run an operation and understand what budgeting is all about. McDonald's will take it from there. For the best future and benefits that include complete medical, dental, and life insurance, paid vacations, and profit sharing, bring your career to McDonald's. We're waiting to hear from you! Personnel Department 682-1651 McDonald's Corporation 10900 Northwest Freeway Suite 222 Houston, Texas 77092 ■McDonalds I ■ I® We Are An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F (( Whenever we're out of the office, the Breakthrough phones are answered courteously and your messages are taken efficiently 24 hours a day by OF HOUSTON a woman owned business • CALL FORWARDING • RADIO PAGING • LIVE ANSWERING SERVICE central office 4215 Grau star k northeast of f ice 4215 Graustark southwest off ice 3221 Fondren northwest off Ice 12345 Kingsride 691-2088 781-3413 467-2111 SN ROBERTA K. TILLINGHAST, PRESIDENT Houston • Galveston • San Antonio • Corpus Christi JULY/AUGUST 11