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Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08
Page 10
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 10. July 1980 - August 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 11, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1980 - August 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/267

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 10, July 1980 - August 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 11, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date July 1980 - August 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 33 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_562aj.jpg
Transcript RENEW WITHOUT A REMINDER Post costs'. Subscribe today! HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Fatal Flowers Meet Rosemary Daniell, author of Fatal Flowers on Sex, Sin and Suicide in the Deep South Monday, July 28, 7 p.m.—9 p.m. THE BOOKSTORE 1728 Bissonnet 773 527-8522 three TV network affiliates in Houston covered it. Bob Wright, assignments editor at KHOU-TV, called KTRH to obtain information for reporter Judd Mcllvain. The radio station refused to give out any information on Rather's tenure there, leading Mcllvain to remark to Breakthrough, "Dan Rather is still being protected in Houston, Texas." Now that Rather has an $8 million contract with CBS to replace Walter Cronkite next year, one can only hope he doesn't decide to do a story on botulism. To those Houstonians who have wearied of wading through Houston City Magazine's trend- ier-than-thou issues—look again. There are muscles flexing lately beneath that flashy exterior. The June cover story, by freelancer Mimi Swartz, took a critical, not-too- complimentary look at popular Houston Post columnist Lynn Ashby. "Is Lynn Ashby just a paper tiger?" asked the subhead. "Yes," answered Swartz. While paying due tribute to Ashby's grinding schedule (five columns a week) and his occasional brilliance, Swartz came down hard on the "not-so-merry punster" for his insensitivity to minorities, women and gays, and his soft, belated stands on thorny local issues. "Ashby makes us laugh," concluded Swartz, "but he doesn't always help us learn. Certainly Houston needs a sense of humor; Houston also needs to think. Beyond the need for better reporting, there is a real need for thoughtful analysis and explanation. Ashby believes he presents an opinion and asks people to think about it . . . The trouble is that the questions he raises aren't tough enough. A good columnist should do more than show us who we are; he should ask us whether we want to stay that way." Swartz, incidentally, has just hit the bigtime with her first article to appear in a national magazine. July's Esquire carries her story, "For the Woman Who Has Almost Everything"—a consumer's guide to vibrators—"with some interesting philosophical observations," qualified a City staffer. In that same issue of City, Alan Wald- man's "Water Hazards" presented a refreshing (albeit depressing) alternative to the old "ten-best" bill of fare. Waldman listed the 10 worst corporate miscreants who are dumping pollutants into the Houston Ship Channel. (The City of Houston is finally Number One in something—it heads the list of offenders.) In "City Slickered?" Editor Tom Curtis took an impassioned stand against the projected Galveston superport, calling deep-draft ships in narrow, congested channels "a ticket to disaster." And Senior Writer Joanne Harrison, in "The Apartment Complex," explained Texas' "medieval" landlord-tenant laws. The July City was even better. Senior Editor Alison Cocjf and freelancer Kaye Northcutt (who has rated many a legislator for the Texas Observer) spent weeks researching their cover story, "Rating Houston's Judges"—an informative, critical appraisal of the "political hacks and martinets and terminal dummies among the Houston judiciary, as well as some outstandingly fair and thoughtful men and women." Since Texas is one of the few states that elect district judges, Cook's and Northcutt's insights and interviews (they talked to almost 100 people) make this piece a handy reference guide for judging the judiciary come election time. That same issue had a story by energy writer Andrew Sansom on Edward Teller ("Papa Strangelove") who has apparently recovered from his Jane-Fonda-induced heart attack. Sansom effectively de scribed the logical consequences of Teller's premise that more is better, as long as it's nuclear. Joanne Harrison capped off the July issue with a blistering "Last Punch" aimed directly at the solar plexus of Channel 8 and the University of Houston. In "Death of a Principle," Harrison revealed "the best-kept secret in public broadcasting: there's a PBS affiliate alive and comatose in Houston Texas." Calling the university's TV station "a masterpiece of mismanagement, with a pitiful budget of around $2.5 million (less than six percent that of WNET in New York)" Harrison claimed that the station has been kept on a short rein by the university for so long that most of the people who work so hard for its fund- raising arm, the Association for Community Television (ACT), don't even realize how badly they're being used. "The ACT people proudly point out," wrote Harrison, "that approximately 65 percent of Channel 8's funds come from the annual auction and from individual subscriptions. They should instead be screaming bloody murder." Harrison claimed that it is impossible for the UH Board of Regents to run the station in a fair and impartial fashion, since they are "political appointees whose principal responsibility is to the state- supported university structure. It is absurd to expect them to be responsible public broadcasters as well. "Things have actually reached the point," wrote Harrison, "that the university bureaucracy is using Channel 8 as just another public relations tool. KUHT is now being required by its licensee to use the university logo on ail its communications and to insert scenes of the UH campus along with the city of Houston scenes used in its sign-off." That's not all. UH President Ed Bishop was recently the scheduled guest on Channel 8's "Project 80." He was to be questioned by three reporters, including Harrison. "On the day before the taping," reported Harrison, "VP Nicholson (who had cancelled fhs Channel 8 airing of Death of a Princess) convinced Bishop that it would be a better move to run film of the university's presidential investiture ceremony together with a voice-over description of the ceremony written by Nicholson himself. The Channel 8 staff was ordered to comply, which they did under protest." Harrison suggested that "if the Board of Regents will not voluntarily allow a responsible coalition of civic leaders and community groups to assume the license HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH