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Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 2. July 1980 - August 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/259.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1980 - August 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/259

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08 - Page 2, July 1980 - August 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/286/show/259.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-07 - 1980-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date July 1980 - August 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 33 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_562ab.jpg
Transcript THE BIG PICTURE July/August 1980 vol.5, no.6 Enclosed please find one of the most blatant sexist articles I've come across. I attended a Real Estate Component Depreciation seminar in March sponsored by North Texas State University and taught by two professors from Arizona State University. I was appalled when copies of the enclosed "humorous" article were passed out to me and the participants after lunch. As copies were passed to the only other woman [present], it was apparent that the lecturer was a little embarrassed, but made the comment that it had been his experience "that women in business were tough and could take it"!! I believe your readers would be interested in excerpts from this unsavory article. (The author, Robert L. Nessen, teaches real estate law at Boston University Law School.) The Overwhelming Case for Allowing Depreciation Deductions on Married Women as a Matter of Equitable and Sound Tax Policy It has been frequently suggested that women do not get older, but better. Whether or not they do get better is a matter of individual judgment and, as such, beyond the scope of the commission's study. What is clear, however, is that a woman does get older. And as she gets older her physical value diminishes according to good, old- fashioned economic theory. It is with this concept in mind that we suggest that a woman, if married, be characterized as depreciable property, allowing her husband to take her as an income tax deduction. ... it is clear that an overwhelming social need would be served by allowing for the depreciation of married women. It would, for example, encourage the marriage of those now living together out of wedlock, thereby restoring the virtue of virtue in American life ... As marriage is a virtue to be encouraged, so is chastity. The purchaser of new real estate, oil tankers, and other property is entitled to take what is known as accelerated depreciation. This means that the "first user" of property is allowed a larger depreciation deduction than one who has pur chased used property. To determine first user in the case of a wife may create some difficulties of proof, but since they have already been overcome by the Internal Revenue Service in the case of cattle, it seems reasonable to think the principle can be applied elsewhere. This part of the program may seem unfair to older women who have made a concerted effort to keep fit. In these cases, we might look to appropriate analogies-the preservation of historic properties and the rehabilitation of housing, where special depreciation benefits have been granted. Perhaps similar approaches could be applied to wives who have undertaken a certified program of physical renewal. This extension of tax policy enjoys not only a social but an economic justification. As a wife grows older her ability to work declines. Housework gets harder, and the conception and raising of children become more difficult. As a matter of quantitative economics, she is wearing out, as any honest woman trying to slip past 40 will admit. This may necessitate the hiring of outside domestic help, a cost which is not deductible. Depreciation will help to compensate for the extra cost I find it most interesting that the author of this article is also on a faculty of a university and even horrifying that this article was written in the 70's, not the 50's or the 60's!! BARBARA R.TIBBETTS I must protest the way you cut my article on the Battaglia Fund (Breakthrough June 1980). I realize that articles must be cut to fit available space, but in this instance, you cut the article at least in half, leaving out much of the substance and emphasis of the story. I wrote the story, at your request, to be an article on wom en's networking-on the impact of having women in influential leadership positions and on the workings of our city government. Had you wanted a mere press release I would have provided that. What makes the situation particularly painful is that you did manage to find space to run a lengthy article on a new "soft sex" queen. I think this raises serious questions on the editorial policies of Breakthrough. My understanding is that you were expanding your coverage beyond strictly feminist issues but that you were still placing an emphasis on women's affairs-issues which are generally poorly covered by other local media. In this past edition, it seemed that you chose to run features at the expense of covering women's affairs. Is this indicative of a new editorial policy? And, please, if you must cut my articles beyond recognition again, just leave my name off of it. SANDRA LONG Editor's note: We regret that this story was edited so drastically. Unfortunately, editing for space is a fact of life in newspapers. In this case, however, the story was typeset in whole (with minor editing), but cut 10 inches due to an error in copy measurement. The two stories which preceded it (on Cindy Pickett and on the run-off election) were already pasted down. Sandy Long has written several articles forus- this is her first complaint. We have not introduced any new editorial policy, this was a logistical problem. You might say we had painted ourselves into a corner. We must take exception however, to Long's definition of Cindy Pickett as a "soft sex" queen. The story's sub-head read: "no soft soap life for this Houston actress." The story made observations on the Houston art scene-"Small town minds have the arts on a leash here" in Pickett's view. Writer Morris Edelson described Pickett's difficulties getting roles in Houston, and called it "a banana republic of the arts." Breakthrough emphasizes politics and the Pickett article dealt with the politics of art. Editorial Cruel and unusual punishment for poor women In ancient Greece, the oracle of Zeus was Dodona, in the land of oak trees. The will of the mighty lawgiver was revealed by the rustlinp of the oak leaves, which the priests interpreted. We've come a long way since then, or have we? In modern America, nine old men in Washington, the land of rustling paper, dress themselves in black robes and interpret the Constitution. The same body which legalized abortion in 1973 has now decreed that that constitutional right cannot be exercised by the poor. The Hyde Amendment, which has been attached to appropriations bills each year since 1976, has been ruled constitutional (June 30) by the narrowest of margins, 5-4. The measure, named for its sponsor, Rep. Henry Hyde, R-lll, bars Medicaid spending for abortions except when a woman's life would be endangered by childbirth or in cases of promptly reported rape or incest. It is bitterly ironic that our Supreme Court, political appointees with not an ovary among them, should presume to limit so cruelly the options of poor women-the women who can least afford the burden of an unwanted pregnancy. Justice Potter Stewart, writing for the majority, displayed an insouciance to human needs reminiscent of Jimmy Carter's "life-isn't- fair" philosophy. "The fact remains," wrote Stewart, "that the Hyde Amendment leaves an indigent woman with at least the same range of choice in deciding whether to obtain a medically necessary abortion as she would have had if Congress had chosen to subsidize no health care costs at all." Congress has, of course, chosen to subsidize most other medically necessary health care costs for the poor. This selectivity, argued Stewart, does not violate a woman's constitutional guarantee of equal treatment under the law. Four of the justices disagreed with the majority. Justice Thurgood Marshall said poor women must now "resort to back-alley butchers, attempt to induce an abortion themselves by crude and dangerous methods or suffer the serious medical consequences of attempting to carry the fetus to term." Justice William Bren- nan, Jr., called it "brutal," Justice Harry A. Blackmun said it means "the cancer of poverty will continue to grow," and Justice John Paul Stevens called the decision "tantamount to severe punishment." Stevens, by the way, is the 1975 Ford nominee to the court whose confirmation was vigorously opposed by the National Organization for Women because his record on women's rights was abysmal. He had ruled, for example, that Illinois could require a three-fifths vote of the legislature to pass the ERA. Because of this ruling, the ERA is still unratified in Illinois. It would seem, then, that the Supreme Court, like Mount Olympus, is out of our reach -that we have no control over its decisions. And that is as it should be. Rather than giving free rein to despotic and opinionated decisionmaking, this system safeguards the integrity of the court. What we, the society, must control is the calibre of our representation in Congress, because it is Congress who confirms the Supreme Court nominations. The message is clear: an elected Congress is our opportunity to take part in policy-making. We must participate in that process if we expect law makers to be receptive to the needs of our whole society. It is essential to support and elect women and men of fairness and decency, from the statehouse to the White House. Like the pilgrims who listened to the priests at Dodona, we can only listen to the interpretations of our Supreme Court. But we can effect change through the legislature; and we must, so that atrocities such as the Hyde Amendment will no longer have a place in our Constitution. ADVERTISING Shirley Bryson, Jane Codings CIRCULATION Missy Hauge, Debra Thornton COPY EDITORS Morris Edelson, Victoria Smith DESIGN David Crossley EDITORS Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff David Crossley, Morris Edelson OFFICE Janice Blue, Jane Collings Victoria Smith PHOTOGRAPHERS Bruce Baillie, George Barnstone Harry B. Blue, David Crossley Jane Hartney, John Lee Simon PRODUCTION Janice Blue, Jane Collings David Crossley, Nancy Dahlberg Janet Meyer, Gary Allison Morey Kathleen Packlick PROOFREADERS Gabrielle Cosgriff RADIO SHOW Co-hosts on KPFT-FM 90.1: Nancy Lane Fleming, RitaSaylors Production Staff: Bianca Balderas, Gertrude Barnestone Michelle Batchelder, Leslie Conner Jack Drake, Stella Fleming Marge Glaser, Karen Saylors TYPESETTERS Lynne Mutchler Jane Collings, Ernie Shawver Second-class postage paid at Houston,Texas. Houston Breakthrough USPS 413130. is published monthly (except for the bimonthly issues of July/August and December /January) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004. Mailing address: P. 0. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions are $7 (one year), $13 (two years) and $18 (three years). Library and institutional rates are $15 (one year), $20 (two years) and $25 (three years). Newsstand and single copy rate is $1.00. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201. POSTMASTER-' Send form 3579 to Houston Breakthrough, P. 0. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH