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Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10
Page 3
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Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10 - Page 3. October, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 26, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2636/show/2632.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October, 1979). Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2636/show/2632

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10 - Page 3, October, 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 26, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2636/show/2632.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10
Publisher Coalition of Greater Houston National Organization for Women Chapters
Date October, 1979
Description Vol. 10 No. 10 of Broadside; Vol. 4 No. 10 of Herizons
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 6 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476034~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476034~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_211c.jpg
Transcript CT jobs and 33 million arce clerical ser- vice, sales or factory jobs--underval- ued, underpaid, underappreciated." Although women office workers have main other complaints, money is their biggest worry. Their salaries of- ton reflect the outdated notion that women work only for "pin money.*' A recent survey by the National Commission on Working Women found that 56 percent of the clerical workers who responded were unhappy with their pay. "A bank office worker averages $ 15 a week take home," says Nussbaum. "But when you walk in the bank as a customer, your salary as a bank employe probably won't be good enough to get you a mortgage or a car loan." Women complain that salaries often are set without regard to their skills or the value of their work. Kinder, the Dayton secretary who earns $144 a week, claims her raises are the same as all other secretaries', even though her work has been rated excellent. Maureen O'ponnell of Boston, a $19()-a-week secretary with a muster's degree, says secretaries often must do a boss's work for a fraction of the salary. A boss once said to her: "I need a secretary to tell me what to do." Fighting the system. In a number of recent court suits, women office workers have challenged standard pay systems they claim give a skilled executive secretary a lower salary than the janitor. These suits have fostered a new rallying cry: "Equal pay for work of comparable value." Although most courts do not recognize this criterion, the National Academy of Sciences has found that job-evaluation systems do have "built-in biases" against women. Many women also reject the old image of a secretary as a personal servant for the boss Among them is Pasrhke. the San Francisco secreary whose du- ties gradually expanded every five years until she was making 10 pots of coffee a day, catering lunches and doing the dishes. She finally told her boss in a blunt memo that she was hired as a secretary—not a waitress. Many mature women workers object to being known as "the girl." Others say they have no promotional opportunities. The National Commission on Working Women survey found 41 percent of the clerical workers were bored by a job that did not use their skills. Forty percent wanted fo quit, but could not afford it, and 26 percent complained of sex bias. These are the complaints that have caused working women's groups to spring up in nearly 20 major cities. "Working Women." an umbrella organization with about S.0U0 members in 15 such groups, has published a bill of rights outlining what the women want. It includes overtime pay, job descriptions, regular salary review's, cost- of-living raises, more benefits, access to advancement, a grievance system and the right to refuse doing personal chores for the boss. In each city, these groups are publicizing women's working conditions with surveys and public hearings. They demand meetings with the local chamber of commerce and corporate officers to discuss pay scales. They counsel women on how to get raises and file complaints with the Equal (Employment Opportunity Commission. Banking has been singled out as their first target. In Boston, a working women's group known as Nino to Five has launched a publicity campaign to upgrade the status of women employes at First National Bank. The group claims it already has won job posting at the bank. But bank spokesman Barry Allen says job posting was the banks own idea, lie adds, "We don't See this as posing any serious challenge to the w ay we operate." Nationally, the women's groups have precipitated a federal crackdown on alleged sex bias in banking. Based on charges brought by a Chicago-based group known as Women (Employed, the federal government is threatening to stop doing business with tunc bank. New federal regulations also have been drafted by the Labor Department that would require banks to post job openings and promote more women. The American Bankers Association sought to dispel criticism recently with a report showing the number of women in lop bank jobs has risen fourfold since 1970. Many unions are looking to these groups as potential sources of new union members. In Boston, for example, some members ol Nine to Five have already joined the Service (Employes International Union. Mans unions are beginning to sign up women office workers, no matter what industry they normally represent. Some 2,000 University of Chicago clerical workers just joined the Teamster*. Over the next 20 years, Nussbaum predicts these efforts will nourish. "I'll look back in triumph." she says. "I'll remember how cart'fully we built a movement of women office workers, led by women, changing the labor movement, changing the country.' Help Wanted A shortage of secretaries in a spoof of corporate life called Nine to Five, which 20th Century-Fox is about to begin filming. Actress Jane Fon- da plays a secretary in a Los Angeles firm that is so large and anonymous that she and her water-cooler chums are not even sure what business it is in. However it docs at the box office, the movie is sure to draw howls of pain from personnel officers. Reason: all over the country, companies are finding that despite today's near 6% unemployment rale, they are having to cope with a severe shortage of secretaries. That shortage is in no small measure, caused by the lingering image of secretaries as decorative gofers. The Department of Labor reports that more jobs arc opening up in the secretarial field than in any of the other 299 work classifications on which it keeps tabs. Although there are already a record 3.6 million secretaries on public and private payrolls, new positions are being created at a rate of 440.000 a year. But while secretarial schools are filled, almost 20% of the new jobs are going begging. Insurance firms and banks have been hit especially hard by the shortage, but the effects are also being fell in such "glamour" industries as publishing, television and advertising. Chicago's First National Bank has fatten giving $500 bounties to employees who recruit new secretaries, and the big CNA insuranc firm, offers color TVs. Sears. Roebuck and California's Crocker National Bank have held open house parties in an attempt I attract applicants. The secretary squeeze has been de- veloping gradually over the past five years, and corporate expansion is only on of the causes. In large part, the shortag is a side effect of the women's movement and equal opportunity programs. Now that they are encouraged to start out i management training programs or go o to study law. medicine or business mar agement, young women graduates are less apt to want to move from campus to a sec rctarial poo! Says Sheila Rather, an ex ecutive with the Manhattan office C Brook Street Bureau of Mayfair Ltd . personnel agency: "Business has never ac cepted the fact that a secretary also want a career path " At the same tune, effort to attract men to secretarial work have fared poorly, while minorities prefer to take advantage of affirmative action pro grams that enable them to get jobs that; promise faster advancement. The shortage is sure to increase pres sure on companies to boost secretarian wages, even though many managers ar gue that they are already offering ample pay for the applicants they are now get ting. ASI Personnel Service, a Chicago re cruiting firm, receives 30 to 40 calls a da from employers wilting to pay $800 to $900 a month for experienced secretarie However, ASl-listed candidates with the required skills are demanding $900 to $1,300 a month. In fast-growing corpo rate centers like Houston, top-level ex ecutive secretaries now command up to $30,000 a year. Several firms are trying to deal with the shortage by making secretarial job more appealing. Crocker, Chevron and Levi Strauss have promotion-from-with in programs aimed at helping talented secretaries to move up the corporate lat der. Some Chicago employers, including the Harris Trust & Savings Bank. Le Burnett and Continental Bank, partici pate in a work-study program that en ables secretary trainees to earn up to $30 a month while honing their skills at a sec retarial school. Many firms have found that older more mature women who have raise their families or are weary of housekeep ing can be lured back into secretarial po sitions. Chevron recently hired a woman of 76 out of semi-retirement to fill a job in its San Francisco office. At the Kath arine Gibbs secretarial schools, many the older women who enroll to retires their secretarial skills are offered jobs be fore the course is over. Says Barbara Lyo the Gibbs "alumnae officer" at the school's New York City branch: "Your secretaries today are restive If you talk to any employer now. he will say. 'Give me a mature woman who has settled down and really wants this job." "