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Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10
Page 2
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Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10 - Page 2. October, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2636/show/2631.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October, 1979). Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2636/show/2631

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10 - Page 2, October, 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2636/show/2631.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside-Herizons Coalition 1979-10
Publisher Coalition of Greater Houston National Organization for Women Chapters
Date October, 1979
Description Vol. 10 No. 10 of Broadside; Vol. 4 No. 10 of Herizons
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 6 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476034~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476034~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_211b.jpg
Transcript NOW PICKETS THE LOUISIANA BORDER Orange, TX - Saturday, September 22, 1979, NOW members from Clear Lake, Galveston, Houston and Huntsville staged an informational picket on Interstate 10. We lined both sides of the highway with people and signs. The signs extended our sympathy to those entering an "unratified" state and welcomed the others back into a "ratified" state. We were well received by all the travelers who waved and honked to signify support. One woman stopped her pickup, wished us well and contributed money to the cause. The three major networks were present to cover the story on TV. Lake Charles, LA also sent over a crew to film our activities. (We hope they took our message back home.) Let us congratulate ourselves for a job well done, with special thanks to Jan Stevens for thr organizing and Jean Saletan for the publicity. Women, men and children worked together Saturday to further the cause of equality for all Labor Women's New Target: Job Bias in Offices Secretaries, typists, clerks and other white-collar women are banding together these days to overcome their low status—and their low pay. Claudia Kinder, a lop-ranking office worker in Dayton, Ohio, decided 10 protest when she could no longer make ends meet on $144 a week. Like these women, thousands of other office workers are beginning to rebel against what they view as low wages, demeaning tasks, poor career opportunities and lack of prestige in the hierarchy of American business. "Women office workers are mad: secretaries are in revolt," says Nussbaum, who now heads a nationwide network of groups representing women clerical workers. "We're mad because we're not being treated fairly." Taking up arms. The rebellion has arrived in most major cities with a flurry of interoffice memos, discrimination complaints and lunch-hour demonstrations. In San Francisco, more than 7,000 people turned out for a National Secretaries' Week rally addressed by actress Jane Fonda. Some women office workers also are choosing a more stringent solution: Unionization. What these women are planning is a massive worker-organizing campaign that they hope will rival the earl) union drives of the 1930s. "This is a steppingstone toward organizing the unorganized workers in this country.*' says Stella Nowicki, an $ll,000-a-year Chicago office worker who also was involved in organizing packing-house workers during the 1930s and 1940s."The union movement is finally recognizing working women as allies."* When the leaders of this drive held a strategy session in Ohio in mid-July. Nussbaum predicted that by organizing women into unions and working- women's groups they would get a better deal in the 1980s. "We can win because there is a need for clerical w ork." site say*. "A growing work force is in a much stronger position." So far results have been modest. Some companies have been convinced to change their policies. A few new union locals have been formed in offices. But most employers claim to be unconcerned by the furor that is being stirred up by these women. Harold for a family of four. In extreme cases, women college graduates get so little that they must hold two jobs or rely on food stamps to get by. In the past, few unions—themselves male-dominated—have tried to organize office workers. Janet Selcer, organizer for the women's groups, explains: "These women have been difficult to organize because of the traditional relationship between a secretary and her boss. There's been a veneer of fanci- ness to office work. Plus, many women are afraid of standing up to the boss." Are these barriers breaking down now? Most experts think so. The rea- sons include inflation, the dramatic influx of women into the work force, the influence of the feminist movement and recent technological changes in office work. I'nions also have become desperate for new members. 'Traditionally, women have been judged by their measurements." says Elizabeth Koontz, head of the National Commission on Working Women. "Today's women have new measurements—42-56-33. Forty-two percent of the American work force are women, 56 percent of adult women hold paid