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Broadside 1971-02
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Broadside 1971-02 - Page 10. February, 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2403.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February, 1971). Broadside 1971-02 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2403

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside 1971-02 - Page 10, February, 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2403.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside 1971-02
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date February, 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 13 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_095j.jpg
Transcript To the Editors: I would like to offer some comments after reading Nancy Callen's brief critique of "Five Easy Pieces." I do not care to suggest that Nancy Callen's anger Is misplaced, nor that her objections, being essentially political ones, are invalid. I do insist, however, that the film should be viewed from a larger perspective than that which N.C. presented in her review. N.C. rightly deplores the depiction of the women characters in the film as "stupid...snivelers," distinguished from one another principally by the degree to which they articulate their subservience to men. It is clear that the women In this story are subordinate to the men who surround them, living out their lives in the structured roles perpetrated on them by social patterns. One even submits in the face of sexist epithets (Penis Envy), probably because she knew no other role, no other possibility of responding than the meek "smile-both hands-on-the-dishes" syndrome. Rather than responding to the depiction of these characters (which generally are quite real), it seems to me that Nancy Callen could have pointed out the fact of these characters, and their parallels in the Real World. Texas is populated with Rayettes, and likewise the rest of the country. They know no age or educational distinctions: their differences are matters of style, not of consciousness. Rayettes, Catherines, Bobbys,and Carls also exist among homosexuals who have not learned to throw off the sexist stereotypes fed them by society, among blacks and chicanos, and yes, among men who likewise are caught in roles offering them nothing but the continuation of destructive social relationships. I do not think Bob Rafelson should be criticized for depicting relationships as they exist (And did they not exist in their sexist destructiveness, there would be no function for NOW, or other similar organizations.). American society is one in which roles are structured according to sex, among other things, and sex roles prescribe particular channels of communication among the sexes (There are more than two.). Although I do not consider it the objective of "Five Easy Pieces" to have presented this particular view of things, it Is certain to me that among the "meanings" that can be had from this film is the notion that people do not talk to each other. It is significant that the only real attempt Bobby made to talk to anyone was to his father, on the shore of the lake, when, unfortunately, it was too late. People just do not drop barriers concomitant with the sex roles they have learned. It is in this respect that you have your work cut out. Finally, I would like to say something in the face of N.C.'s last paragraph, which concerns history, or the re-writing of it. N.C. suggests that a movie "which portrayed black people in such a way would not be tolerated." Perhaps it would not, and to my mind, that would be unfortunate. I should tend to think that history (and by this I mean aggregate events and not the recording of them) would best be rewritten by the concerted effort of people to Intervene in the process of changing the social system. Art reflects a consciousness, hopefully not banal. I would have considered it more dishonest of Rafelson to have presented a host of extremely liberated women in this film, when, in fact, this host would be difficult to assemble, even in Paradise. I must add, for balance, that he would be hard pressed to find a similar host of liberated men. The fact is that we have worn out the ancient but venerable ways of relating to one another, and all need liberty to try new ones. As inarticulate as it is, my point is that all of us who feel the weight of sexist categorization should be less inclined to wipe out the symbols of our repression than to use them as a source from which to draw strength. There will be no need to destroy stereotypes when the consciousness of all people is raised to the level of awareness of sexist structures. They will disappear, and people can be people, regardless of sex. Off Sexism! Charles Williams Cambridge, Mass.