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Broadside 1971-02
Page 7
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Broadside 1971-02 - Page 7. February, 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2400.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February, 1971). Broadside 1971-02 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2400

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside 1971-02 - Page 7, February, 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2400.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside 1971-02
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date February, 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 13 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
Item Description
Title Page 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_095g.jpg
Transcript Making it Kaye Northcott "This is what I want to do. Everything else I did seemed like preparation for what I wanted to do. And now I'm doing it." Kaye Northcott is editor of The Texas state's only independent journal liberal opinion, published fortnightly. Although she doesn't belong to any women's liberation group she leads "a women's lib-type of life." "I remember that I always resented ray mother's role and was more interested in my father's." Unable to see herself fitting into a way iof life as limiting and repetitious as housework, she decided on a career. "I always wanted to have a career, but when I thought of having one, I thought of being an old maid. It was all rather grim. It's another myth women learn. Instead, I have found my career to be an exuberant experience." Kaye took what she describes as the "usual route" to get to her present position. She received her bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Texas in 1964 and went 2ast. Career women going to New York to find a job was, she discovered, another myth. Unable to find a satisfactory job, she returned to Texas. She worked for the Houston Chronicle and later for Newsweek. Unsatisfied, she returned to the University of Texas to get her M.A. While there,she was editor of the Dally Texan and was politicized by Frank Erwin, former chairman of the U.T. Board of Regents. At one point Erwin threatened to discontinue the Texan's editorial page if Kaye didn't quit writing "dovish" editorials on Viet Nam. After receiving her master's, she worked for the Capitol Bureau of American Newspapers, Inc. for nine months and later for the Houston Post. While at the Post, she learned of an opening on The Texas Observer, applied for it, and got the job. She was co-editor under Greg Olds and is now the editor. Her co-editor is Molly Ivins, who was chosen because "She was the best qualified and not because she was a woman." According to Kaye, "The important thing about women's liberation is that it is emotionally liberating. I have less emotional hang-ups and a healthier relationship with men." Part of this emotional liberation as she sees it is getting away from the stereotyped view of a career and marriage. She doesn't intend to give up her career and is not averse to marriage. Her view of combining the two is different from most. "Marriage is okay, but the hang-up is children. My idea of marriage is to get up to a good breakfast, go to work, come home to a nice hot meal, dandle the kids on my knee, and go to bed." SUSAN B. ANTHONY CONT'D. Lucy Stone) joined the National Woman Suffrage Association. In I892, Susan became the president of the new organization. At the age of 80, after serving eight years, she resigned, although she continued to work for women's suffrage almost as busily as before. Gradually, however, Susan began to succumb to age. In 1906 she contracted pneumonia. She died on March 13, 1906. One of the few complaints she ever uttered was that she must die before women could vote. On her deathbed she said, "Just think of it. I have been striving for over, sixty years for a little bit of justice no bigger than that, and yet I must die without obtaining it. Oh, it seems so cruel!" At the memorial service, Carrie Chapman Catt expressed the feelings of women all over the nation when she said, "We have not lost a leader alone, but a dear, dear friend, whose place can never be filled. We shall never see her like again."