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Broadside 1971-02
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Broadside 1971-02 - Page 6. February, 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2399.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February, 1971). Broadside 1971-02 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2399

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside 1971-02 - Page 6, February, 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2406/show/2399.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside 1971-02
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date February, 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 13 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
Item Description
Title Page 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_095f.jpg
Transcript HERSTORY SUSAN B.ANTHONY by Betty Barnes February 15. 1820— March 13, 1906 Susan Brownell Anthony was born on February 15i 1820. She was reared as a strict Quaker—a religious group in which women spoke as readily as men. She worked as a schoolteacher during the early years of her life. While teaching, Susan became actively involved in the temperance movement. She soon discovered that women were not to speak but to listen and learn. Continually confronted with the idea that women should not speak in public on any subject, Susan came to feel that women's rights were inextricably interwoven into the cause of temperance. Encouraged by such figures as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and Lucy Stone, Susan soon decided women's rights came first and devoted her life to that cause. In 1856, Susan also became active, in the Abolitionist Movement. She continued to speak as eloquently asrainst slavery as for women until the Civil War, often facing strong abuse from mobs, for neither cause was a popular one. Before and during the Civil War, the Abolitionists had been staunch supporters of women's rights. After the war, relations began to cool. The former friends began to proclaim this "the Negro's Hour." In 1868, Susan and about 100 women left the Equal Rights Association and formed the National Woman Suffrage Association. The Equal Rights Association had committed itself to support the Fifteenth Amendment which excluded women from the vote. Elizabeth Stanton, Susan's closest friend, became president of the new group, with Susan as a prominent worker and organizer. In 1872, after considerable thought, Susan decided that the Fourteenth Amendment could be interpreted to give women the vote. She and 15 other women registered to vote and voted in Rochester, New York. The women were charged with voting illegally. Susan alone was tried. During the trial, she was not allowed to speak. The judge ignored all rules of law and justice and insisted that the verdict be guilty. Susan was fined $100 which she refused to pay. "May it please your Honor, I shall never pay a dollar of your unjust penalty. All the stock in trade that I possess is a $10,000 debt, incurred by publishing my paper, the Revolution, four years ago, the sole object of which was to educate all women to do precisely as I have done, rebel against your man- made, unjust, unconstitutional forms of law, that tax, fine, imprison, and hang women, while they deny them the right of representation in the Government;and I shall work on with might and maim to pay every dollar of that honest debt, but not a penny will go to this unjust claim." The judge refused to jail her for non-payment and therefore Susan lost any chance for appeal to the Supreme Court, an appeal that might have changed the course of women's suffrage. The battle lost, Susan continued to fight the war, working for an amendment to the Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote. She continued to circulate petitions, po on lecture tours, and lobby in Washington for this "Sixteenth Amendment." It was not until I89O that the first major success was won. In that year Wyoming, became the first state to give women the vote. That year women's suffrage supporters were united into one organization. Much to Susan's joy, the American Woman Suffrage Association (led by CONTINUED NEXT PAGE