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Houston Breakthrough, August 1976 - September 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, August 1976 - September 1976 - Page 1. August 1976 - September 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2375/show/2355.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976 - September 1976). Houston Breakthrough, August 1976 - September 1976 - Page 1. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2375/show/2355

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, August 1976 - September 1976 - Page 1, August 1976 - September 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2375/show/2355.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, August 1976 - September 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date August 1976 - September 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location Call # HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name femin_201109_520a.jpg
Transcript . Vol. 1, No. 7 AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 1976 50 CE 5Q< ^ This is a crime against women" Stones promote violence The Rolling Stones cancelled their U.S. concert tour due to "poor sales" of their latest album "Black and Blue." And in Los Angeles, a group called Women Against Violence Against Women (WAVAW) took credit for the Stones' decision to cancel--and subsequent economic loss. Women Against Violence Against Women, a coalition of feminist individuals and groups, organized a successful national boycott against the record album and its distributors Atlantic Records, because the promotion for the record depicted a smiling bound and beaten woman saying, "I'm Black and Blue from the Rolling Stones--and I love it." "This campaign exploits and sensationalizes violence against a woman for the purpose of increased record sales," said Julia London, Los Angeles coordinator of WAVAW. "The ad contributes to the myth that women like to be beaten and condones a permissive attitude towards the brutalization of women." A focal point of WAVAW'S protest was the billboard-advertising "Black and Blue"--that went up in June on the Sunset Strip area of Los Angeles. The coalition of WAVAW sent out strong releases demanding its immediate removel. A wave of phone calls from outraged people flooded Atlantic Records and Ryan Outdoor Advertising offices. A delegation of women from WAVAW visited Atlantic Records and Ryan in Los Angeles on June 21. The billboard came down the next day. But not before some unknown protester climbed on top of the building where the billboard was located and wrote "This is a Crime Against Women." L.A. photographer Barbara Malarek took a photo of the billboard and told Breakthrough she Continued on page 13 NADIACOMANECI JENNIFER CHANDLER Why U.S. women couldn't win By Jan Cunningham "Herstorians" writing the story of the Olympic games in Montreal will have to call 1976 the "Year of the Women." Women have finally come into their own, sharing the spotlight, the glory, the medals and the accolades of their countrypeople with their male teammates. Led by Kornelia Ender with world records in the 100 and 200 meter freestyles, the East German women swept all but two gold medals in swimming. They often finished with third place times that eclipsed men's records of only eight years ago. In Gymnastics, the Russian women held on to the team medal, but 15-year-old Nadia Comaneci of Romania proved more powerful than the full Soviet team. She scored seven perfect 10's and captured the all- round title, the balance beam, the vault and the uneven parallel bars. In track, it was again the East German women, being pushed strongly by the Russians and tiny West Germany, while the Soviets again dominated the field events. The showing of the U.S. team was dismal. The subjects of massive pre-Olympic publicity, they simply failed to live up to expectations. The U.S. women won only three gold medals and a handful of silver and bronze. Jennifer Chandler took the SUSAN BABASHOFF Springboard diving event. The U.S. 400 meter freestyle relay team of Kim Peyton, Wendy Continued on page 13