Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Page 20
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 20. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2248.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 20. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2248

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 20, February 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2248.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1978
Description Vol. 3 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 20
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_537s.jpg
Transcript Community Classrooms By Rachel Burke The classroom is a livingroom. The students are women who are sharing their attitudes and fears abour rape. The atmosphere is relaxed and informal. One of the woman asks the teacher, Joan Morgan- stern of the Rape Crisis Coalition, whether it is best to resist or remain passive in a rape situation. "The most important thing to remember is survival—whatever happens you want to come out alive. Don't be passive but use your head. Keep in mind, if you are going to use a weapon or some sort of self-defense, that you had better do it right because if you fail you are only going to make your attacker more angry. Keep talking, forcing the rapist to see you as a person, an individual, rather than as an object to overpower. Do whatever you think is most likely to work for you in the particular situation you're in." This seminar on rape prevention is one of several courses now being offered by The Class Factory, a new Houston business started by Donna Gerdin. Says Gerdin, herself a volunteer at Crisis Hotline, "Rape prevention is a pet issue for me but I would like to offer more of these very necessary public service courses in the future." Other classes currently being taught include Consumer Rights, Assertiveness Training, Our Bodies, Ourselves, Demystifying Computers, and a tax-deductible class on preparing your income tax. There is also a variety of skills one can learn ranging from Creole cooking to simple car maintenance. Before moving to Houston, Gerdin worked with a non-accredited educational program in Washington, D.C. "A friend of mine started it a couple of years ago and needed some help getting it off the ground. Also, as a single woman in a large city who didn't enjoy going to bars, it served as a social outlet for me. I think the same holds true for Houston. There isn't a very strong community base here, a place where people can meet each other and participate in enjoyable activities together." So Gerdin began thinking of starting a similar program in Houston. "I asked my friend to come down and work with me for the first few months and she, said no. Really I wanted her to come down and do it (start the business) for me but she wouldn't let me get away with that." So Donna brought the service to Houston herself. "We printed up 10,000 catalogs and distributed them in office building snack bars, health food stores, grocery stores, laundromats . . . places people pass through every day. The most difficult job NEUMEYER cont'd from page 4 was locating teachers. We put ads in several local newspapers and called on several small businesses." Most of the classes for the first session were taught by friends. Demystifying Computers, for example, is being taught by Gerdin's husband and Printing Production is being offered by the firm that prints the Class Factory's catalogs. "Public response to the catalog was excellent," says Gerdin. "Along with registration we got lots of support- suggestions for classes, requests to be on our mailing list, and people just writing to say they were interested and excited by the concept. . . . I'm very excited by how many people I've gotten to talk with. The more participation, people liking it, the more energy and strength I have to go further. . . . It is vital for me to keep getting feedback. Once I cut myself off from listening to people I might as well fold." Gerdin believes the Class Factory is different from Adult Education and programs like the Sundry School in several ways. "Most of all we are trying to capture a community structure. Courses are usually taught in the teacher's home, which makes the atmosphere more informal, less a part of the traditional academic structure. It also makes location more convenient because people can usually find a class that's right in their neighborhood. We want to attract people not only to the variety.of classes we're offering but also to the social element." "I try to keep prices as low as possible," says Gerdin. Most classes cost between $4 and $25 and tuition is 'split evenly between the teacher and The Class Factory. Some classes, like the rape prevention seminar, are free. "We handle all administrative work from registration to advertising, and offering a class with us gives the teacher good publicity. Also, the social structure is there as much for teachers as for students. "I would like to be able to have child care available as well as more community services-a book exchange, for example", says Gerdin. "I would also like to offer more seminars and discussion groups on things like Life After Divorce and Being Single in Houston. I would like to expand beyond the Southwest and downtown areas where I am currently concentrating my efforts." The next session of classes will begin in March and run through the end of April. For more information about The Class Factory call Donna Gerdin at 526-9069 or write The Class Factory / 1907 Southwest Freeway /Houston, Texas 77006. All of these magnet schools are there for young people who have a potential toward some specific field, and certainly it is a voluntary thing. So if a young person is turned toward that kind of thing, they will have the choice of going. The precedent of a governmental agency recruiting potential police officers from its adolescent population may be disturbing to some civil libertarians, and the issue of this particular magnet school may turn out to be a hotter one than Neumeyer anticipates. Whether the school will feature a broad based criminology and law curriculum or merely serve as a ghetto for police recruits is a question the mayor will have to answer soon, and this issue will probably provide challenges for Neumeyer as well. She was not prepared to comment on a projected date of completion of the magnet school proposal. Other projects that Neumeyer describes as "rather special to me" are opening the schools to senior citizen activities and working with the parks and recreation department to set aside some recreational areas for people of all ages. These programs are still being researched, and no estimates of budgetary impact were available. Neumeyer's manner was friendly, if somewhat formal. She answered questions carefully, with attention to the shape her language was taking, and every response came in the form of a complete sentence. She was patient and she was precise, even when she was evading a direct answer. For example, she would not answer the question "Do you support the Equal Rights Amendment?" "Well, let me say this. I do believe that we do have our rights under the Civil Rights Act, and I think that the issues can be really well-defined through legislation, if that's necessary. If there's an inequity or inequality in something, I believe that it can be done through specific legislation that really pins it down, rather than through broad statements that still have to be defined later." Similarly, she would not say whether or not she was a feminist. "I think before I can really say yes or no, I would need to know what you define as a feminist. There are a lot of problems and concerns of women that are very just and I share. Then there are probably certain other areas that I feel are not that important, and I tend to just sort of hone in on some of them that to me look like they are more important than the others. I'm not just an across the board type person that thinks anything that a group per se wished to do is exactly the thing to be done. I guess I'm kind of an independent thinker." "Gradually we're seeing that more people are becoming aware that a woman can be very much in place in several roles. Women have certainly the capabilities to be career people, mothers, housewives. I think that one of the problems is having everybody accept this fact, and if J were really to think that everybody would or should I would be a little too idealistic. I think that acceptance of whatever role that a woman wished to be in is the most important thing." COATS cont'd from page 4 with her gregariousness and flair. She has the "What's Right About America attitude and expresses it vivaciously, clearly. She did not commit herself in her remarks on abortion: "Well, people who feel very strongly, like on the pro-life thing, the abortion issue, that's their business, and if they want to get out and fight for what they believe in, I think they ought to. I think we all ought to. What you want to do, what you want to be, go out and do it. That's what I have done. There's no religious reason, no anything, other than I just wanted to do it. And that's how I am about the ERA, any of those things. However they feel, do. In this country the majority rules it anyway, and if a person feels strongly enough I feel like they're just obligated to be a voice." Similarly, she skirts the ERA. "Well, I think the ERA is great. As far as I'm concerned, I don't need it. I've got a completely happy marriage, and I've always laughed and made a joke about this, that my husband's always treated me ► better than he treats himself, and I sure wouldn't want it put back the other way. But I realize that's a silly argument, because of the fact that things are not always that way anywhere else. I happen to be happy with my particular role in life, but I think if I were not happy in it, I would be out trying to better it." Aside from filtering the calls and letters that the mayor receives, Coates will also be serving as the liaison between the mayor's office and the Civil Defense Department, a job which she says she is "thrilled to death" about. Her enthusiasm for her job seems as great as her enthusiasm for the city itself. A rectangular poster-size photo of downtown Houston at night hangs on her wall, an array of skyscrapers and lights overlooking the frame houses of the inner city. "I'm getting up in age now, my kids are grown, and I can indulge myself. Whatever I want to do now, I can do, and I choose to work to help the city. You know, somewhere along the line you carry your own weight, or you pay your dues. I'm thoroughly enjoying it." SuperTearGas Non-lethal spray INSTANTLY STOPS ANY ATTACKER call Kathy 5230305 $6.95+tax HOUSTON BREAKTHR1&JGH February 1978 Page 19