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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Page 18
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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 18. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2246.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 18. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2246

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 18, February 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2246.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1978
Description Vol. 3 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 18
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_537q.jpg
Transcript Another great start on the Weeh... By Neal Barrett 10 a.m. In the car and on my way through a gray Houston morning. The radio says low 30s till nightfall, with petro-sleet and rain by Tuesday. 10:20 a.m. The new client is okay. He reads both Time and Atlantic Monthly and makes up his own mind. He knows, by my beard, that I am a liberal thinker, too. He also knows I have a partner/wife and tells me he encourages women in business. He believes if women really work at it, they can get to the top and still retain their femininity. I make a note to tell Ruth. 11:30 a.m. I find it easy to keep a finger on socio-sexual thinking in the business world. I am a man, and an automatic member of the club. I am also a writer, as well as an advertising person-so people tell me things they might not confide to another. They know that we writers are radical and amoral folk, and can be trusted with the truth: that they are not all they appear to be, either. There is a talk show on the radio. The Rotarians or whoever have applauded the mayor's decision to rid us of Nikki Van Hightower. Some of the callers are pleased with this. One says it is another step in warding off the evils of ERA. For some reason, she does not wish to share my urinal at hockey games, or serve with me in the armed forces. Another call. From a man. I get an uneasy feeling about this one. He is breathing too hard, and he wants to know more about wife beating. Is it true what he hears? "I mean, a lot of them kinda like it, don't they?" 12 noon I call the office. Ruth is pounding out advertising gems, can't go to lunch. There are bills in the mail, even a few checks. The printer is being unreasonable again. She reminds me I am to attend a meeting that evening. I remind her we are an equal opportunity company, and that we will draw straws for this one. I am not enthusiastic about attending. I feel I am gaining little from this group. And they are certainly getting even less out of me. Among these people is a token successful woman, a person who has risen through the ranks of this band. She makes money. She is an inspiration. What ,she is, is a female good oP boy. She has made it in a "man's world" and she is anxious to remain the solitary hen among these admiring roosters. She is the resident expert on women's rights. She has explained to us that ERA is a crock-an excuse for sexually frustrated women who want rights without responsibility. Mostly, these women are lesbians. Some -worse still-are intelectuals. They do not appreciate what their husbands go 'through in the business world. They could get somewhere if they would only follow the rules. Like she did. She frequently tells us how to recognize an ERA supporter: They carry bent coathangers in their purses, for emergency abortions. 1:30 p.m. My afternoon client is one I have met before. We are consolidating our deal, which promises to be a good one. When we are finished, we engage in a little small talk. He is curious about the advertising business. Which part, exactly, do I do-and which part does Ruth do? I have heard this question before. He is smiling, but behind this smile is hesitation. The copy he wants us to do is heavy industrial stuff. He is thinking he is not at all sure how / would look in a hard hat— and he is certain he doesn't want some woman working on his ad. "I guess your—wife-does a lot of fashion stuff, right?" Wrong, I tell him. Placing foot in mouth again. I explain that Ruth is some better at financial and petrochemical writing, while I turn out pretty fair home furnishing and cosmetic copy. I leave him to ponder this. He will see me again, because I come highly recommended. But he is an astute businessman, and a keen judge of character. My manhood is on the line. He will be on the lookout for tell-tale gestures and mannerisms—and he will quickly spot any girl stuff in his copy. 2:15 p.m. The talk show continues. A woman has the answer to the abortion question: The Bible tells us we must kill all doctors who take a human life. She is also against lesbian teachers undressing in the classroom. Especially below sixth grade level. A man calls in. He is the same one interested in wife beating. He agrees -we ought to send all the lesbians baclc to Russia. If we don't, though, which Houston schools do they ordinarily undress in? 3:30 p.m. Back to the office. Ruth on the way out to haggle with printers. She will also stop by and talk to our attorney about bringing suit against a former client. This fellow is really not a bad sort. Some months ago, after a few drinks, he gave Ruth a friendly pat and told her by God, honey, if there's one thing he was for it was equality for everyone. He informed us that just as the Lord had seen fit to "make a couple of pretty smart nigger businessmen," He had also turned out some damn competent women. This man practices what he preaches. He ignores his bills equally, without regard to race, creed, color or sex. 5 p.m. Not for the first time, I am wondering exactly where we are going. I am not sure we are getting anywhere fast in the equality game. And I have decided we talk too much about bright, successful women. Whatever it is, it isn't equality. Equality is the right to get to the top without displaying a great deal of talent. It's the right to gain professional status while retaining your mediocrity. The right to be accepted for your half- assed efforts, and get paid for it. This is not to say the male business executive is generally incompetent or inept. Some are, some aren't. The fact is, a great many men get-and keep-high- paying jobs in the worlds of commerce, industry and government without ever being quite sure which end is up. Men can get away with this. You can't. At least, not yet. M "The first time I asked why I couldn't umpire anything other than the center line, they told me in all seriousness that 'women can't see as fast as men.' " Calling the shots By Susan MacManus Julia Collier is an effective-and outspoken-women's advocate in a profession dominated by men. An active member of the Houston Tennis Umpires Association (HTUA), she serves on that organization's board of directors, and is a member of the Operations Committee which chooses chief umpires for all HTUA tournaments-including the annual Virginia Slims event. She was the first recipient of the Most Improved Umpire award given annually by HTUA. Collier currently holds the status of both a Section Chair Umpire and National Life Umpire. These titles allow her to serve in Houston-area tournaments, and national tournaments sanctioned by the U. S. Tennis Association. Collier encourages women who enjoy tennis to get involved in HTUA. At present, she points out, membership is about 90 percent male. "Some women quit from sheer frustration-because they're not allowed to umpire anything but the center ( line." (The center service line is generally recognized among umpires as the easiest— and least prestigious-to call.) Julia Collier feels that many women involved in the profession never get either the nerve or the confidence to tell the chief umpire they want to move up from the center service line to a more "whistled-at line." Whistling, she explains for non-tennis fans, is an audience reaction to a questionable call. "The whole tennis umpiring scene needs to be opened up-and women can do it, if they are aggressive and interested enough in the game." Collier notes that "very little special attention or encouragement is bestowed upon new women in the organization who show potential-unless they are outspoken. If a man shows promise, the other men will go out of their way to help him develop. A woman simply has to fight her way up." Collier has met the challenges of her profession by being both outspoken and good at what she does. At the Woodlands tournament two years ago, she was the only umpire who received a perfect rating. Although Collier is guardedly optimistic about changing attitudes among some male members of HTUA, she thinks the association should be making a more active effort to encourage the participation of women. She also believes respect for female members of the profession should be demonstrated in other ways: Many chair umpires continue to refer to line umpires as "linesmen," even though official USTA rules call for the term "line umpire." Collier is also concerned by the fact that women are not chosen by HTUA to serve as chief umpires in the large, prestigious tournaments, where such officials are paid an average of $350. Instead, she says, women are judged "competent enough" to serve as chief umpires in tournaments where there is nominal pay, or no pay at all. Collier feels less than optimistic about women's chances for umpiring on the national level. "Women don't stand a chance," she says. "It's almost impossible to get involved in Team Tennis officiating. About all we can hope for is more equity in participation at the local level." Still, Julia Collier isn't about to give up. "Listen," she says firmly, "I can defi- nitely see as fast an any man out there... HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH February 1978 Page 17