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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Page 16
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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 16. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2244.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 16. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2244

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 16, February 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2244.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1978
Description Vol. 3 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 16
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_537o.jpg
Transcript CYNTHIA MacDONALD SuzannePaul dogs opening february 14 seven to ten if) X Id f- UJ 0. W _: Showing at Roberto Molina, Inc. 2437 Vz University Blvd. Houston, Texas 77005 713-522-2358 - Gallery Hours - Tuesday-Saturday Noon-S p.m. Thursday til 9 p.m. Closed Sunday & Monday Elsie sat, reading "The Cat in the Hat," Analyzing its rhyme scheme. The cellar flooded. Elsie put Chopin on the record player and turned the volume higher. The house caught on fire; It was completely burned. Elsie moved the family to an apartment and painted the flames, calling the picture "Winter Overturned. " Her husband, because she ignored him, Developed a series of psychosomatic ailments. She painted his portrait, complete with boils, In oils. When her children turned to slate, She realized what she had done, But although she sang to them and painted Their gray bodies flesh pink, They remained stone. from "Amputations,"George Braziller Publishing Co., New York Poet m person By Patricia S. Fuhrer Many mothers bronze their babies* shoes as keepsakes. Cynthia Macdonald, American poet and coordinator of the creative writing program at the University of Houston, has her son's feet in a velvet-lined box. In the poem "Departure," from her collection of poetry entitled "Amputations," Macdonald figuratively amputates and saves her son's feet. Her first collection was published in 1972 and was followed by "Transplants" in 1976. This spring a third book of poetry, "(W)holes," will come out. Macdonald's hectic shedule includes traveling about 4,000 miles each month. She commutes to Houston every other week from Baltimore where she is professor of a writing seminar at Johns Hopkins University. Previously she taught at Sarah Lawrence after earning a master's degree there in 1970. Before she began publishing poetry, Macdonald was a lirico spinto (soprano) opera singer. Fifteen years ago she won the San Francisco Opera auditions and placed third in the West Coast Metropolitan Opera auditions. "I probably could have had a successful career as a singer," Macdonald said in a recent interview at her University of Houston office. "But poetry is like a disease; it comes on you," she continued, quoting American poet Robert Penn Warren. "I write because I must write." "I could choose to give up singing, but I could never choose to give up writing." Although Macdonald spends a great deal of time commuting from the east coast to the gulf, she stays in Houston for special events. The University of Houston and P.E.N. (Poets, Essayists and Novelists) cosponsored a national writing conference in November. The senior editor of Doubleday and Co. and the editor of panel discussions, Houstonian Donald Barthelme, fiction writer for "New Yorker" magazine, Macdonald and others presented an evening of readings for the public in conjunction with the conference. Prior to the P.E.N, conference Macdonald attended the National Women's Conference. "Yes, I'm a feminist," Macdonald said. "I support the ERA. Women should have a chance to realize their ambitions." However, she said, many of the conference slogans were "simplistic," probably because simplicity is necessary to achieve political goals. "Equality will come," Macdonald said, "but it will require grass roots work which will be slower and less fun than going to a convention." Macdonald knew since her early teens that she wanted children and referred to her two, Scott, 18 and Jennifer, 21, as centrally important in her life. She believes strongly that pursuing a career while rearing a family is possible. She paused for a moment and looked out of her office window. "You know," she began slowly, "women come to me and say they don't have time to write. I tell them they do have time to write. What they don't have time to do is give dinner parties." Macdonald's family is rooted in Houston. Her grandparents lived in Houston for many years and Macdonald often visited here though she is a native New Yorker. She has incorporated aspects of Houston into her poems and says she would like to see the city become a center for writers and writing. Macdonald is often asked how much autobiography her poetry contains. She considers the question irrelevant. "I use dramatic monologue," she said. "It is one of the ways a poet has of shaping emotional experience and making it 'art.' I don't like to separate fiction and self." Then she laughed, snapped her lorgnette closed and leaned forward in her chair. "You wouldn't ask a fiction writer if all his stories were 'real' would you?" she asked. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH February 1978 Page 15