Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Page 12
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 12. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2241.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 12. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2241

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 12, February 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2241.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1978
Description Vol. 3 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_537l.jpg
Transcript The Midwife Each evening as the sky bruises and then turns painless, the old woman moves toward the spine of the hill. She has given up every kind of garment, and her eyes have drained of the names of things. They pick at her faith with their thorny mutterings, but she no longer notices. She continues her pilgrimages carrying only the smile that has been her life's work and a clay doll which she fondles till it sings of the heavy water in the earth's belly, soon to break with the new child. —Rosemary Catacalos "And Where Are The Women Poets?", A Reply this woman is no moon; what you see, she owns and more; pain, fruit, visions push between her legs into the mexican streets, into office building mail slots, into musicians beds and political strategy meetings; she piles them on altars, fills her daily coffin with them, celebrates easter at every opportunity with candles, bread, red eggs; she owns her laughter, her incest, her grief; owns portions of her compassion, of all the hands she's ever held, of all the vagabonds, tramps, magicians, gypsies, jokers, wanderers, all the blessed who ever sought the garden; owns constantly, every second, over breakfast, in the car, at the ocean, through the windows, in the music, with the madmen, in the churches, at the desk, at the well, the wonder at why blood isn 't blue, a color to ward off the evil eye; owns the mirror, owns the labor, owns the fever, the pain of labor, the ecstasy of bearing illusion, the necessary child. still, men stop her in the street to pummel her womb and ask angrily why she will not give birth. — Rosemary Catacalos Totsie Rosemary Catacalos Overheard at the Basilica The old woman spoke of harder days, days when children flew in the windows like flies, eyes glued shut from hunger, crying "Mama, Mama!" ^ and carrying knives with which they " threatened one another as they all dove for the pitiful pile of beans she had laid out, steaming, on her belly. She had done her best for them all. A few had died, boys with the stench of urine or fever stuffed up their noses, girls with their spines arched like bows and their own blood between their legs; but many had survived and lived now in the big, government housing towers, and lit candles themselves, and came less and less often to see her, except for the stone-eyed boy who said he was her grandson and went through her purse when he thought she was occupied amoung her few flowers in coffee cans. Ayyy, this was how she had earned her sainthood. "Jesus, Mari, Jose..." Now there was the luxury of being hungry alone. —Rosemary Catacalos HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH February 1978 Page 11