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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 10. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 26, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2239

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 10, February 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 26, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1978
Description Vol. 3 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_537j.jpg
Transcript Sailing the Caribbean on Sappho II i^^mmMjm^m^^g^^^^^sm^mm^ By Deborah Diamond Hicks and Nancy Landau During the IWY, The Daily Breakthrough ran an ad for all-woman Caribbean cruises. Conference-goers had the opportunity to place their name in a draw for a free one week cruise. Patsy Lee, a Houston teacher, was one of the winners. She was unable to take time for the trip but we inherited it and set sail January 8. -D.D.H. and N.L. The man stood at the stern of his 60-foot sailing yacht and turned to watch us go by, letting an entire tray of luncheon silverware fall into the sea. Maybe it was the sight of six bare-breasted women and no men aboard an elaborately teaked sailing ketch, or maybe it was the name that caught his eye. In any case, he's bound to remember the day he dumped service for eight when the Sappho II cruised by. agines all sorts of lechers, single and otherwise, perched on the railings, waiting to insinuate themselves into your vacation. The presumption is: no woman goes on a cruise unless she is looking for a man. Two women alone must be looking, too, or something queer is going on. Women come to know these presumptions—they are the same ones that keep them from enjoying the night air, or going on safari, or to a restaurant or movie, or having a drink alone. The original Sappho, of ancient Greece, lived on the Isle of Lesbos, wrote love poems that were sometimes directed to other women, and thereby gave name to lesbianism (Sapphism in the archaic version), the phenomenon of women loving other women. She was a poet, scholar, teacher, wife and mother, and a respected citizen, who spent much of herlife encouraging young women in academic and cultural pursuits. She was Sappho I. Sappho II is an adventure designed to give women an opportunity to sail, dive, windsurf, enjoy- within a small group of women, learning from each other-just as Sappho provided an opportunity for girls and women to learn together. Considering the ambiguity of Sappho's reputation, perhaps the name of our boat has created an unnecessary obstacle to women considering this alternative adventure. In fact, Sappho II is open to charters for any individual or group, mixed or otherwise. Her home port is St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, 1,200 miles southeast of Miami and $318 round-trip from Houston. We'd always pictured cruise ships as huge pleasure tankers that travel at night (while everyone aboard gets full and tipsy), then stop during the day for liquor- cigarette-and-perfume shopping. One ihv We arrived in St. Thomas by way of Minneapolis and Nashville, northern refugees with suitcases full of gloves, hats, boots, and ski jackets. We thawed our frozen bodies at the Hotel 1829 (both the phone number and the year it was built)— bright pink stucco, brick terraces, tile staircases, and oddly shaped little rooms carved out of stately old ones. There was exotic seafood to sample, and a Honda 90 that worked best when we got off. Captain Marge McKeever called Sunday morning to confirm our arrival and welcome us aboard. We stashed our belongings, ready to brave the seas with cut-offs and bathing suits—and t-shirts for formal wear. We chose the aft cabin, downed a few Bonine tablets to placate our inner ears, and waited for the other four passengers to arrive. But no one else ever came! So, the captain took on a third crew member to give her additional experience. And so we set off- six women out for six days of sailing. The general response to Sappho II was incredulity-all women?! The boat herself is a 51-foot ketch that sleeps nine, crew included. The interior is teak and holly with cupboards everywhere-"whiskey box," "equipment," "guest," "head." Our first lesson was on marine toilets and the proper pumping procedures. Everything was brilliantly compact; everything had its place-underwater movie camera, diving gear, plastic- ized fish observing books, nautical charts, cruising guides, fishing tackle, plush towels and tasty snacks. Four of us continued our vegetarian lifestyles, which was another real treat. Imagine a place where it's cool to be a woman and a vegetarian! We had freshly blended pina coladas, all sorts of cheeses, fresh vegetables, fruit salads and baked breads. And there was plenty of roast beef, lasagna and ham for the carnivores among us. After Sara Lee coffeecakes or some such for breakfast, we would secure all moving parts (remember "batten down the hatches"?) and set sail "over the bounding main." Interesting how these phrases suddenly take on new meaning. We were welcome to participate in sailing preparations and maneuvers, and each of us took a hand in lowering the sails, securing the shackles, handling the winches, making up the lines (the nautical version of ropes) and plotting our course. We took as much sun as our winter bodies could bear (18 degrees North latitude being more direct than Houston's 30 degrees). We would sail until late lunch-time, then pick a protected bay for swimming, snorkeling, windsurfing, or reading up on the area. Sometimes, we took a dinghy to shore for a hike. Surprisingly, after days of sailing, we were dizzier on land than we ever were at sea. Back on board, we'd find everything "ship shape" again. It was quite pleasant to leave meals and clean-up to the crew. (Women need to remember to relax when they get the chance—and this was our vacation.) Evenings included star gazing from the deck, entertaining visitors from other boats, and a local fish fry. Still, there was ample time for solitude. Most interesting of all were the conversations-talk ranged from C-R style to political debate. It was an opportunity for each of us to speak out in a group of other women, share common experiences and learn from each other. We didn't have to give equal time to football, or humor a guy proud to announce he was an MCP. We began at a common point, as women, and we went on from there-birth control, a- bortion, sexuality, parenting, ERA, travel, adventure. McKeever, the skipper, told tales of her days as a home economics professor, pilot, hot-air balloonist, Albuquerque silversmith, five years on her own sailboat, and living aboard Sappho II. The other crew members live on St. Thomas and earn their living near the water-varnishing masts, crewing, waitress- ing, bartending-anything to stay near the sea. Often, they talked about going "down island" some day, and owning a boat of their own. The Sappho II gives them a chance to work in positions which have traditionally been closed to women. Here, they can get away from the stove and galley and onto the decks for some actual sailing. We cleared customs on St. John, as most of our time was scheduled for the British Virgin Islands. There was hiking to the sugar plantation ruins at Caneel Bay, and windsurfing in the Great Harbor of Jost Van Dyke. Once, we anchored for the night off Norman Island (Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island) and snorkled near the Caves, passed Deadman's Chest, and crossed Peter Island on foot. Back in the "real world," our midwinter tans reminded us that it's hard to come down from such a journey. One starts thinking of alternative lifestyles, and going down island from it all... n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the he&rt of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama -Houston 77006 • 1 713) 523-2521 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH February 1978 Page 9