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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 8. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2237.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2237

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 8, February 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2237.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1978
Description Vol. 3 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_537h.jpg
Transcript and women By Anita Davidson When Paul Cezanne saw Manet's Olympia, he is reported to have remarked, "That would please me well enough: to pose nudes on the Arc's banks! Only understand, women are cows, calculating, and they'd put the grappin (grappling hook) into me." The painter who translated the traditional into the modern, imprinting his unique vision upon the course of 20th century painting, suffered crippling anxiety when confronted with a nude woman, and never overcame the fears and inhibitions that prevented him from realizing his lifelong dream of painting out-of- doors from nude models. Although at the age of 56, he did finally paint from a nude model in his studio, most of his bathers are taken from prints and photographs; a situation that conflicted with his sincere espousal of the importance of painting from nature: "The truth is in nature, and I shall prove it." Cezanne was a man torn by conflicts. His almost total inability to relate to women had as its obverse side an extremely close emotional bond with his mother and his sister Marie. His mother appears to have recognized and cherished elements in her son which she felt to have been callously thwarted in herself; and his strong sympathy for his mother brought about an identification with her subservient situation, contributing mightily to both his antagonism a- gainst his father and his omnipresent anxieties. Cezanne's father, Louis-Auguste, on the other hand, must have hidden a great deal of forbearance for his son under his authoritative manner, for although making money was his sole interest and criterion of worth, until his death he supported Cezanne with an allowance with no hope of a cash return. Further conflict resulted from Cezanne's relationship with the only woman (apart from his mother and sister) who ever penetrated his isolation. The bubbling vivacity of Hortense, who gamely took on the roles of model, mistress, mother of their child, and wife, is never revealed in the many portraits of her which Cezanne painted. Rather, she stares mirthlessly, a solemn, stolid presence. After Hortense gave birth to their son, they lived apart in an effort by Cezanne to conceal from Louis-Auguste the existence of both Hortense and the child. He feared the loss of his allowance. They did eventually marry, but the marriage was principally for the protection of the legal rights of the boy whom Cezanne adored, and Cezanne and Hortense continued to live apart, apparently losing all feeling for one another. Cezanne became more and more the recluse; strange, solitary, obsessed, vehement. Cezanne's conflicting attitudes toward women were reflected in his attitude toward his art: devotion and rejection, hope and doubt, optimism and despair. Never truly satisfied with his work, he pursued relentlessly an elusive harmony ; not a lyrical praise of nature, but a harmony of all the elements, balancing permanence with impermanence, the stable structure with the tensions of change. In the last decade of his life, his incessant return again and again to the same subjects transformed his search for nature's truths into explorations of light and color never before attempted. It is the work of these final years that has been gathered from all over the world into the grandest and most comprehensive exhibition of paintings we are ever likely to see. Cezanne: The Late Work, contains 59 oil paintings, 44 water- colors, and six lithographs focusing on his recurrent themes in portraiture, still lifes, landscapes, skulls and bathers. If one word could describe this exhibit, it would be "searching." There is no one "style," but a wide range of stylistic innovations from the deep, somber tones of the three Vallier portraits, to an Oriental delicacy in the watercolor Foliage and certain views of Mont Ste-Victoire in both water- color and in oils inspired by the water- colors. The exhibit has been organized by William Rubin, director of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, in association with Prof. John Rewald of the City University of New York Graduate Center and Prof. Theodore Reff of Columbia University. It has been produced in collaboration with the Reunion des Musees Nationaux, Paris, and facilitated by an agreement signed by the French government and the Museum of Modern Art providing for the exchange of art loans. The exhibition is supported by major grants from IBM Corporation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Museum of Fine Arts is one of only three art institutions-two in the United States and one in Europe—to host this landmark exhibition. It opened first at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where it surpassed previous attendance records, and following its Houston stay, it will be shown at the Grand Palais in Paris. Supplementing the exhibit is an orientation gallery which includes a slide program. Scheduled with the exhibit are a 40 minute film, Paul Cezanne, from Sir Kenneth Clark's Pioneers of Modern Painting series, a four-part class on "Cezanne and His Times" presented by David Brauer, visiting lecturer at The School of Art: Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and a major symposium and series of lectures discussing Cezanne and his art. All events are open to the public free of charge. The exhibition opened Jan. 26 and will be on view through March 19. Three Bathers, c. 1878. This is an early attempt to solve Cezanne's composition problem of nudes in a landscape. 1710 Sunset Blvd. (713)527-9838 4.7 -^ __T_f_i__v ri_^> 10 a.m.—5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. - ■ fit *>., TERRACOTTA PLANTERS; frog, $4.50 to $30; Tree of Life wall planter, $6.50 to $15; wall planter with two birds, $7 to $12; sun, $7.50 to $30; spherical wall planter, $8.00. HAITIAN IRON CUTOUTS, $15 to $75. J&ii Ml &Mt, $nc. East ex Freeway at Little York Houston, Texas 77093 Telephone: (713) 694-6631 /^-T^N t.cWJ 75-ANMVBBAJW yf^OSLy /jOytL— SALES New and Used Cars New and Used Trucks HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH February 1978 Page 7