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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
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Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 7. February 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 25, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2236.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1978). Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2236

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1978-02 - Page 7, February 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 25, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2254/show/2236.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1978-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1978
Description Vol. 3 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_537g.jpg
Transcript WavlEN Ai\d Power How is power used? Who has power? How do you get power? Does oppresion truly end with women's liberation or does the concept remain the same while the oppressed group changes? These and other questions will be considered in Women and Power: A Workshop on New Definitions of Power on Saturday, March 4. Sponsered by The Women's Group of The First Unitarian Church, an organization devoted to awakening consciousness of women's position in society, the workshop will benefit the new Houston Area Women's Center. Registration is $10 and proceeds will benefit the planned Houston Area Women's Center. Leadership for this event will be provided by a distinguished group of local women, plus special guest, Zillah R. Eisenstein, faculty member at Ithaca College, I thaca, New York. Her book on the subject of women and power will be published in March. Participants include Theolo Petteway, past president of Black Women for Social Change; Nikki Van Hightower, former Women's Advocate and President of the Board of the new Women's Center; Cilia Teresa, businesswoman and feminist philosopher; Helen Copitka, psychologist and Commissioner of the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles; and Hilary Karp, clinical psychologist and faculty member, The University at Clear Lake City. These women offer a broad range of ethnic backgrounds, professional achievements and personal lifestyles. All are activists in the women's movement. The First Unitarian Church is located at 5210 Fannin. Workshop hours are 8:30 to 5:30. Daycare will be provided at $2 per child. Lunch can be purchased at the workshop and an hour of relaxation and sharing will end the day. For further information, call 664-2915, 524-8898 or 668-8919. on film by Victoria Hodge Lightman If Saturday Night Fever made you want to get up and dance, The Turning Point will seduce you into rushing right out and buying a season ticket to your local ballet troupe. The industry seems to have found the secret of making musicals with the realism we insist on having in our entertainment. So even if we're not singing yet, we are dancing and loving every minute of it. Or as the gangster's moll in the Marx brothers',4 Night at the Opera exclaims, "I want to live! I want to dance! I want to ha-cha-cha-cha!" The Turning Point is more choreographed than directed by Herbert Ross (The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, The Sunshine Boys). Ross' career began as a choreographer in the ballet and then he went into Broadway and films. Ballet seems to be his special love, and the dance sequences in The Turning Point are exquisite. His wife, Nora Kaye, is the executive producer for the film. She was billed as America's "foremost dramatic ballerina" until her retirement from the American Ballet Theatre (ABT) in 1960. It is odd then to see a parallel character to Ross in the film. Rosie, played by Anthony Zerbe, is a man who gave up conducting ballet for Broadway and is reproached as being "a man without soul." The best reason to see The Turning Point is to watch MikhailBaryshnikov and Leslie Browne of the ABT. Baryshnikov is the first ballet superstar and the first to be so well documented on film while he is still in his prime. His movements are powerful and magnificent; he reduces the audience to involuntary ooh's and ah's. He is the quintessence of physical perfection. It's ironic that after all the years of persecution and ridicule that male dancers have had to contend with, our next male sex symbol could be a ballet star. Leslie Browne, who plays opposite Baryshnikov in the somewhat hokey (almost Ken Russellish) love story, is also a lovely dancer. Though not as inspiring as Baryshnikov, she is graceful and energetic. She has all the enthusiasm of the young dancer who has been given her first chance to show her stuff. There is no real acting necessary here as Browne's life is an almost perfect parallel to that of the character Emilia. There are two stories in this film, and Ross' strength obviously lies with the ballet sequences. The story going on behind all this is a fairly simple one that deals with the classic "road not taken" and "What curious memories we all have." The actresses, luckily for Ross, require little direction. Anne Bancroft plays Emma, an aging prima ballerina; and Shirley MacLaine plays Deedee, her long-time friend who gave up a similar career for marriage and a family. Emma and Deedee are involved in a complex relationship where they love, hate, admire, despise, envy, respect, support and abuse each other. When they were younger they competed for the role in Anna Karenina (a fictional ballet created for the plot). At the same time, each chose the life she wanted: "...and you got pregnant," "...and you got 19 curtain calls." Twenty years later they find themselves in competition again, each envying the other's life. Was it really what they wanted; how different might it have been? Or, as Deedee puts it, "What's it like to be you now?" They influenced each other during that first turning point, ana* it is only logical that they should seek each other out now. They are struggling to redefine their egos. They need a reassurance that will only be satisfied when it comes from each to the other. Deedee mistrusts the admiration that her daughter Emilia, played by Browne, has for Emma. Her children confront her with the true source of her dilemma—was she as good as Emma? "I was different." Emma, for her part, is more than aware of all the young ballerinas who are anxious for her to retire so that they can step into her place. Emma encourages tisements. They promise us a film about two women "at the crossroads of their lives," with the ballet as merely a landscape against which they play out their doubts, fears and jealousies. It appears that the co- producers, director Ross and writer Arthur Laurents (West Side Story, Gypsy), have attempted to cover too much ground. Perhaps they sensed that Mikhail Baryshnikov and Leslie Browne would not draw as di- "...and you got pregnant.' "and you got 19 curtain calls." Page 6 February 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Emilia's admiration and tries to become her mentor, usurping Deedee's position. Emma wants to choose her own successor. Emilia is the likeliest candidate for this artistic transference. The resentment and frustration between the two mount to a final showdown at the ballet's gala opening in New York. It begins in the bar where Deedee hisses bitterly, "Dearest friend, you're one thing that Emilia will never be. You're a.killer." Emma throws a drink in her face and they challenge each other to "step outside." Here we see two women who have been tutored a life-time in the art of discipline and self-control finally let loose. They stand on the deserted concrete expanse of Lincoln Center shoving each other a- round. They push, kick and tear at each other, hurling bitter truths that scrape the nerve endings like fingernails across a blackboard. The wrestling soon becomes an embrace, the yelling subsides into laughter. Deedee points out to Emma, "If there had been a photographer here, you'd have had a whole new career." And Emma finally concedes to Deedee that she did encourage her to leave the ballet for a very good reason, "You were good, you could have hurt me." The major disappointment about this film is the result of misleading adver- versified an audience as established stars like Bancroft and MacLaine—especially at $4 a head. Both Ross and Laurents claim that they are fully satisfied that they have made a "woman's film." They haven't. They have made a fine musical, but a lousy woman's film. Unlike Julia, One Sings the Other Doesn 't, and Wives, all the women in this film are involved in competition with each other, just like women are supposed to be, right? We don't have to settle for this. And worst of all, the name Deedee scrapes my nerve endings like fingernails across a blackboard. Trc-1940's Clolhiny & Cdlaliblcc 15% off with this ad 45____29i_____^95J_: