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Houston Breakthrough 1976-11
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Houston Breakthrough 1976-11 - Page 1. November 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/179.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1976). Houston Breakthrough 1976-11 - Page 1. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/179

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1976-11 - Page 1, November 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/179.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1976-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_522a.jpg
Transcript Vol. I no. 9 November 1976 50 cents 1 Manpower' wastes womanpower By Suzanne Gray Why did the federally funded job training program known as Manpower change its name to Concentrated Employment Training Act (CETA) on October 1 ? Nikki Van Hightower, Houston Women's Advocate, told me she recommended the name change because she felt "Manpower" gave a false impression that women were excluded from the programs. Division director Palmer Bowser, Jr. said that the sole reason for the name change was the threat of a suit by a national company, Manpower, Inc. of Milwaukee. I decided to find out for myself whether the name change indicated a growing emphasis on non-traditional jobs for women. I told the receptionist at the CETA Service Center on 811 Westheimer, that I needed a job. After taking my name and address, she motioned me to the straight-backed chairs arranged in rows. Then she resumed her cheery chat with another employee. About 15 persons were already waiting, although it was only 8:30 a.m. Many looked resigned and familiar with waiting. After 45 minutes my name was called, and I was asked to complete an application form. The game of musical chairs had begun. To the man who scanned my application I presented a false profile: divorced mother of two with no means of support except for irregular support payments. No job training, no work history. After perfunctory approval, he referred me to a counselor. There was no explanation of the CETA program, nor were any tests or skills assessment offered. Actually I saw two counselors that morning, both women. They passed me back and forth, seemingly perplexed and a little irritated at my blankness. However, my neutrality was my foundation: I wanted them to direct my course. My only assertive direction was the need for making money. The first question relating to jobs was, "Can you type?" followed by, "How about filing?" I was then given a list of beginning office trainee positions to consider. Most of these paid $300 to $400 monthly. When I had been asked what I thought I could "get by on," I'd said $500. This brought a condescending snort from one counselor and the retort, "You can't expect to start at the top, honey!" Reviewing the jobs, I suggested driving a small delivery truck. "I know a man who does that and earns good money," I said. The counselor replied that that was hard work and besides, a special license was required. Continued on page 14 By Peg Roper 'Virgin Vault' for women students' U H dorm policy opposed The University of Houston's dormitory policies are illegal and discriminate on the basis of sex according to Dr. Nikki Van Hightower, the City of Houston women's advocate. Van Hightower, a former UH associate professor, said, "I think these practices are patently illegal and violate Title IX of the 1972 Civil Rights Amendment. According to James Calaway, president of the Texas Civil Liberties Union, ". . it would be very likely that the American Civil Liberties Union would provide funds for legal aid to any student wishing to prosecute the university." The UH policy in question restricts visitation hours of male guests in the two all-female dorms while it allows 24-hour unrestricted visitation hours for women guests in the three all- male dorms. A sign posted in the lobby of North Moody Towers (one all female dorm), gives male visit- THERESA CHAVEZ, a welder, said she'll be lucky to find a job as a trainee when she completes the CETA program. ing hours from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. Friday, noon to 2 a.m. Saturday and noon to 7 p.m. Sunday. Guests must sign in and out with security at a desk checkpoint in the women's lobby. At the other all-female dorm, Bates Hall, male guests are not required to be registered with security but they must be escorted to and from the room. Bates Hall visitation hours are from noon to 10 p.m. Sunday and Thursday and from noon to 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. But the all-male South Moody Towers, Taub Hall and Ober- holtzer Hall do not appear on a mimeograph entitled "University of Houston Residence Halls Visitation Policy." According to residents and their student advisors (SAs), the actual practice in those dorms is unrestricted visitation. Title IX is the Department of Health Education and Welfare's Education Amendment of 1972. Title IX provides that "no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." Title IX section 86.32 states that . . ."a recipient (of federal funds for educational programs) Continued on page 16 WIA plans for referral service Plans for a women's information and referral agency to serve the Houston community are under way. Women in Action, a broad- based coalition of local women's groups and community agencies, has convened a series of planning meetings and set up a steering committee to guide the effort, according to Edna T. Anderson, WIA president. Anderson says that the need for a place and a service designed especially to deal with women's concerns such as emergency housing, job discrimination, establishment of credit and medical and legal aid has become increasingly apparent during the past year as hundreds of calls from women seeking help have poured into the Women in Action office at 3317 Montrose. A small group of community leaders are presently spearheading the referral service planning effort; members of the Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood have volunteered to research and organize a master file of community resources. Interviews for volunteers may be arranged by calling Women in Action, 527-0718.