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Broadside 1971-04
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Broadside 1971-04 - Page 8. April, 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1988/show/1983.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April, 1971). Broadside 1971-04 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1988/show/1983

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside 1971-04 - Page 8, April, 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1988/show/1983.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside 1971-04
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date April, 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
Item Description
Title Page 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_093g.jpg
Transcript IN A ONE-NER of speaking Dear Sir: Having proposed in these pages (Voice letters, December 17) a new epithet—Phallustines—I am back again, still in the game of wordsmith to women's liberation, with another proposal designed to solve an old problem. The problem is that words like "chairman" and "spokesman" are, with reason, distasteful to women as one more indication of a male- dominated world; this is so because "man," once denoting simply a human being, has come to connote a male even in combining forms. And yet words like "chairperson" and "spokeswoman" (both of which are in use) are rather awkward owing to their extra syllables. My proposal, appealing and even elegant in its simplicaty and perfectly legitimate linguistically, is this: "chair-one"—the one in the chair instead of the man or woman in the chair. It has almost the same sound as "chairman" (and even, if this be not too fanciful, a faintly unisex sound). In the same way, "spokes-one"—the one who spoke. Plurals, of course, with an "s": "The chair-ones of the several committees will have their reports ready." (Avoiding the necessity of "chairmen and chairwomen.") Also: The Congress- one, the Council-one, the milk-one (milkman), the police-one (not to . mention the Weather-one—Bernadine: please note), the English-one and French-one, sports-oneship, possibly oneups-oneship, and even the low-one on the totem pole. We can and will say "humankind" for "mankind," but perhaps it would do us no harm to contemplate "one-kind." Incidently, though I use the hyphen since it's a new form, I should expect the hyphens to disappear when the usage became accepted. It may be that increased use of the words "one" and "one's" and "oneself," and perhaps other new departures in the usage of them, will prove to be the way out of the "his-or-her" bind. The word "one" might come to take the place of the spoiled word "man"—spoiled, that is, as a word for a human being of either sex; there seems to be no other single-syllable word that could do it. —Ann Sheldon Manhattan P. S. If men have taken over the word "man" and made it theirs even in combining forms, I might point out that "girl" meant originally a young person of either sex—and we women have taken that over. We in women's liberation might, therefore, be wiser to follow the tendencies that are already in the language, and increase and strengthen the use of the word "girl," rather than to eschew its use in favor of "young women in their cradles." "Girl" has the advantage of brevity; it is, I think, a more attractive-sounding word than "woman"; and, above all, it's not a feminine construction on the word "man." And people, I think aren't going to stop using it. from The Village Voice February 4, 1971 Anyone who would like to write an article or essay for The BROADSIDE on an Issue involving women's rights should contact Laura Douglas at 529-6400 or Helen Cassidy at 748-5369. Letters to the editor and your suggestions and comments are invited.