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Broadside 1971-04
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Broadside 1971-04 - Page 5. April, 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 2, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1988/show/1981.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April, 1971). Broadside 1971-04 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1988/show/1981

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside 1971-04 - Page 5, April, 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 2, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1988/show/1981.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside 1971-04
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date April, 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
Item Description
Title Page 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_093e.jpg
Transcript Getting STRAIGHT ( continued ) rarely used. The standing committee may also recommend an amended version of the bill to the house, so what comes out of the committee may bear little resemblance to what went into the committee. After coming out of the standing committee, the bill must be placed on the agenda of the whole house. There are a variety of ways this is done but the usual way is to arrange a time with the presiding officer. If a bill manages to get to the floor of the house, there will be debate and amendments may be attached to the bill. Again, the bill may be changed considerably. Eventually, there will be a vote by the house. If over half of the members present and voting vote yes, the bill has passed its "second reading." If a majority of members vote no_, the bill is dead. No less than one legislative day later there is to be a second vote on the bill. The bill must get yes votes from a majority of the members present and voting in order to pass this "third reading." At this stage, amending the bill takes a 2/3 vote, so amendments are rare at this time. IF a bill has managed to get this far, it is now ready to go to the other house. The whole process is repeated in the second house, except the bill does not have to be introduced by a member of that house— the bill is automatically introduced since it passed the first house. The bill MIT-S7' pass both houses or it is dead. If the bill has passed both houses in identical versions, it goes directly to the Governor. If the bill has been amended and passed by one house in a different form from the bill passed by the other house, the two versions of the bill must go to a conference committee. This committee is composed of five senators appointed by the Lieutenant Governor and five representatives appointed by the Speaker. The conference committee must write one version of the bill which will then be presented to both houses for a final vote. Conference committees have been known to completely rewrite a bill so that the final version looks like neither version originally presented to the committee. The bill that is written by the conference committee must obtain a majority vote in both houses. No amending is possible by either house at this stage. If a majority of either house vote no, the bill is dead. If the bill is passed by both houses, it then goes to the Governor. He may either veto the bill, sign the bill into law, or allow the bill to become law without his signature. If the Governor vetoes the bill, it is dead unless it can get a 2/3 vote from both houses to override his veto. This is seldom done. In order to get through this long and tortuous process, any bill must have a hard-working sponsor who gets it through all the roadblocks. Also, the Speaker and/or the Lieutenant Governor must not be hostile to it or the bill has little chance of passage. Although similar bills on the same subject can be brought up at different times, generally there is only one major bill per subject and if this bill dies or is killed, that bill or a similar one must be introduced anew in the next legislature—two years away (except for special sessions). Then the bill must go through the whole process again. It is a matter of some wonder that any bill ever manages to become a law. NIXON HALTS MILITARY ABORTION President Nixon, once again speaking ex cathedra, has abolished an order liberalizing abortions in military hospitals. Nixon says he personally opposes abortion as "an unacceptable form of population control." The President's order will make military hospitals comply with the generally more restrictive abortion laws in the states in which they are located. It nullifies a Pentagon directive of July 31, 1970, which made it easier to obtain abortions in 163 military hospitals throughout the country.