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Broadside, January 1971
Pages 8 and 9
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Broadside, January 1971 - Pages 8 and 9. January 1971. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 27, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1553/show/1545.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1971). Broadside, January 1971 - Pages 8 and 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1553/show/1545

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, January 1971 - Pages 8 and 9, January 1971, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 27, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1553/show/1545.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Broadside, January 1971
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date January 1971
Description Vol. 2 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • National Organization for Women--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Pages 8 and 9
File name femin_201109_096h.jpg
Transcript SHE'S NOT OUR SISTER ! FIVE EASY PIECES -MOSTLY WOMEN by Laura Douglas In her article, "The Feminine Mistake," Esquire, January, 1971, Helen Lawrenson decries the "manipulated hysteria" and "splenetic frenzy of hatred for men" of the Women's Liberation Movement. Using a barrage of emotional language ("sick, silly creatures," "phony movement," "These are not normal women. I think they are freaks.") no less hysterical in tone than the "strident speeches" she accuses Women's Liberation advocates of making, Ms. Lawrenson seems most concerned to show that all women in the movement are men-haters. She proves this logically by stating that they all hate housework, the mother-wife role, and that many of their leaders are divorced, separated, childless, or unrepentantly single. She seems to favor the "I state It, therefore it is true" method of proving her generalizations. If I had less knowledge of biology, I would swear Ms. Lawrenson has a severe castration complex No less than eight times does she refer to egregious forms of men- hating and male subjugation. The motivating factor is possibly the male assumption that once in power we will do unto them as has been done unto us. I have to admire her thoroughness. She has dragged out every canard in the anti-feminist litany. Lack of space limits the number of charges I can respond to. Most emphasized is the "biology is destiny" or "culture is nothing" argument which tells us that woman's primary function is reproduction and everything else is superimposed This leads into the ancillary argument that there is no career more rewarding than that of wife and mother and that a woman who truly loves a man wants to wait on him and be bossed by him—to deny any of the above is "bucking nature." The corollary of the woman who has no choice, who is not an independent human being, not an equal partner, but is forced to live through her husband and children and in frustration nags and belittles them Is never assumed even though Ms. Lawrenson bemoans the fate of the hen-pecked husband. Woven throughout the above argument are threads of the feminists' contempt for the "average normal woman"(i.e., housewife), the idea that a woman who is "gifted, ambitious, and determined" enough can make it(also known as the Gifted Negro Theory), and the reminder that there are more urgent problems to be considered. The only contempt for housewives seems to be coming from Ms. Lawrenson who has made it(i.e., gifted as opposed to average)and thinks that men have more monotonous Jobs to perform than housework which "may get tiresome at times but it sure as hell beats working." Since housewives do not get paid for their labor and since money is the mark of value in society, It Is assumed that what they do is not work but a "natural" form of semi-goldbrickingo The existence of other problems is not an argument for postponing women's rights, but clear proof of the need for independent human beings working in equal partnership to solve those problems. The denial of rights, the denial of choice prevents the development of full human potential. Impedes change, and cripples society. The time of people as objects, of any kind, is past. The time of human beings must be NOW. This is a movie which, for some reason, has been receiving enthusiastic reviews. The name refers to the title of a beginner's piano book, but it could Just as well allude to the women portrayed In the film. All of the characters in the film are shallow which, I suppose, is what it is all about. The female characters are particularly weak, however. The lower-class wo- men(waitresses and bowlers)are portrayed as stupid, non-verbal snivelers. The central male figure is constantly and painfully embarrassed by their linguistic bloopers— but they are good for a "lay" and by Nancy Callen are therefore tolerated. In vain I waited for these poor dumb females to display some tiny shred of strength, character, or individuality of thought. The upper-class women(concert pianists)are more linguistically adept but still "know their place." They beg, cry, and mutter such Freudian insights into female character as "M-m-m, I hear that sailors are sadistic." When delivering one of the rare speeches of self- awareness in this movie, one of them Is silenced in typical Hollywood fashion by a kiss. A movie which portrayed black people in such a way would not be tolerated. THE PRIME OF MISS BITSY BEEKMAN Reviewing a comic strip is a chancy Job. It makes one watchful and a little irked. Explaining a comic serial is not difficult. Predicting the outcome would not tax the capacities of a double- digit I.Q. But gauging the pace is tricky. Accordingly, this review is dated (Jan. 1, 1971). If gaining public attention can, in Itself, be considered progress, then women's liberation has recently made a giant stride. No longer merelv the butt of one-line Jokes from single-cell brains, the women's rights movement now enters millions of American homes daily as the subject of a highly popular and widely syndicated comic strip. Milton Canlff has left off detailing the exploits of Steve Canvon, career hero and Air Force officer, to turn his almost undivided attention to women's liberation. (He paused on Christmas day to condemn those who talk about by Helen Cassidy peace at the price of dictatorship and to salute those who are fighting in "far-flung places" to ensure peace.) It is evidently difficult for Mr. Caniff to stray too long OiH". too far from war and the armed forces—those subjects closest to his heart. From his cast of characters, Caniff has chosen Bitsy Beekman, an individualistic pilot, to carry the banner of women's rights. Given his obvious prejudices, it is easy to speculate why she was chosen. Bitsy has been previously portrayed as a frustrated female in frantic search for a male. She has always worn men's clothes. She has frequently been Jealous of more attractive women. Furthermore, she is in no way related to Steve Canyon. (God forbid the women's movement should ever closely touch our hero.) His choice is obviously not because she is an able defender of the women's movement. cont'd, next page