Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08
Page 13
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 13. July 1979 - August 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979 - August 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1522

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 13, July 1979 - August 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date July 1979 - August 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_552am.jpg
Transcript % % Women and children took up arms with the Sandinistas to overthrow Somoza. behave. We heard, too, that the people burned the house of a doctor, a relative of ours who was with the Somoza national guard. Another relative, an engineer, we are told is on the Sandinista list. A female relative, a Marxist, jailed by Somoza, was recently freed by the Sandinistas. It is the same with just, about every Nicaraguan family. Nicaragua is the largest country in Central America and yet the most sparsely populated (fewer than 2.5 million people). In a small country everyone's related. Almost every family in Nicaragua lost a relative in this war. Everyone was involved. Not only the men but the women and children took up arms against Somoza — 13-year-olds were fighting and dying. A month before Somoza was deposed, he started drafting women. I keep thinking of Somoza as another product of the U. S. military, just like the rest of the military products designed to keep communism away from the American people. Never mind that those products hurt, maim, kill people in other countries such as Vietnam, Nicaragua, Iran (the shah was another military product). Our government supported the shah and Somoza almost to the end, as it continues supporting the production of more weapons and other military products governing other Latin American countries. One of the things that turned the American tide against Somoza was the slaying of an American TV news reporter. Now that was really going too far—thousands of Nicaraguans were killed; but, how can they kill one American? It was as if his life was really the only important life taken during the conflict. U. S. Vice Con sul John Bargeron said, "This is a war of murder . . . Nicaraguans are killed like that every day." The government of Mexico broke diplomatic relations with Somoza last May charging him with "genocide against the people of Nicaragua." It seems strange that Somoza, the ultimate dictator, can own so much property in the U.S., the ultimate democracy. I wonder if the American people associate Somoza's investments in the United States with the plunder of the Nicaraguans. After the Managua earthquake, it was reported in the U. S. that Somoza appropriated relief food for the national guard and loans for his private enterprises. Was this the monev he used to purchase his U. S. loans for his private enterprises. Was this the money he used to purchase his U. S. properties? Isn't the acceptance of stolen goods as punishable by law as the act of stealing itself? But then maybe all this going around the law is necessary "to keep communism away." I wonder if a Marxist regime would be much worse for the Nicaraguans than Somoza's "benevolent dictatorship." And what is going to happen to Nicaragua now? One of my sisters and I discussed that this morning. It occurred to me while we were talking that two years ago, even in May of this year, I doubted that the Sandinistas could depose Somoza. He kept saying he would not leave until 1981, and with strong U.S. backing and Israel continuing the sale of arms, I could only think that he would indeed stay forever. (Strange alliance indeed between "oppressed" Israel and the despot Somoza.) But the Sandinistas deposed Somoza. And now how to reconstruct Nicaragua- the economy is in a shambles and thousands of refugees are without food and shelter while Somoza lives in luxury. I was told that at some community shelters children were given one tortilla a day to keep them alive. Stores have been ransacked. Businesses are closed. The junta says all properties belonging to Somoza, his family and his allies will be assigned to state control as part of the "national patrimony." The government will thus own his farm, factories, and even La Nica, the national airline! At the moment, it seems to me that reconstruction is impossible. But that's what I thought in May about Somoza leaving Nicaragua. I know that the immense courage and sense of purpose of the Nicaraguan people will make reconstruction happen. The U.S. ambassador to Nicaragua, Lawrence Pezzullo, said in Washington last week that the United States played a large part in ousting Somoza. "Our role was to get Somoza out," he said, "and we did it...there was great foresight on the part of the U.S. government in seeing the problem and bringing about a solution through political change." In spite of what Pezzullo says, the solution will be brought about by Nicaraguans for Nicaraguans, as the war was fought by Nicaraguans for Nicaraguans. Other nations will be helping in the best interests of Nicaraguans. I hope the United States will be one of them. Cilia Teresa is a Houston businesswoman. She is a former national NOW board member and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Ms. Foundation. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 13 JULY/ AUGUST 1979