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Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08
Page 4
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Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 4. July 1979 - August 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 25, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1513.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979 - August 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1513

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 4, July 1979 - August 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 25, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1513.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date July 1979 - August 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_552ad.jpg
Transcript Newsmakers Bette Graham White public relations consultant and former Houston mayoral candidate, has formally filed as a candidate for mayor of Houston. "I propose to lead city government, not be swept along by events," says White, "Houston needs leadership, not stewardship" White is a founder of The Fourth Ward Clinic and an organizer of The Hunger Project. She has a master's degree in theology and religious education. Her three-point platform includes: 1) efficient city management, 2) a responsible spending program to address tax pressures and 3) accountability. Judith McCandless Rooney has been appointed Associate Curator of The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Rooney had been a staff member at the Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh since 1976, most recently as Assistant Curator of Painting and Sculpture. Rooney will coordinate the Museum's forthcoming handbook of its permanent collection and will have curatorial responsibilities in her fields of interest, nineteenth and twentieth century art. I Ralph Waite , star of I the TV series, The Waltons, has donated $25,000 towards a facility for the Houston Area Women's Center, to be named for his late sister, Joan Waite Hanlon. Capital funds for the facility will be raised by the Joan Waite Hanlon Houston Area Women's Center Foundation, of which Waite is the founding member (see story p. 17). Shere Hite , author I of The Hite Report, is suing the McMillan Publishing Company I for allegedly with- ! holding about $780,000 in royal- | ties on her book. Hite charges that in 1975, when she m signed her agreement with McMillan, she was induced to sign a limitation clause holding her earnings to $25,000 a year, supposedly for tax benefits. She says although the book has since earned over $875,000, she has received only $75,000 plus the $25,000 advance. She received nothing from the $800,000 paperback rights sale in 1977 although her agreement entitled her to $400,000. Hite used no agent or attorney to negotiate the McMillan agreement. She said she was not told she would earn no interest on funds held under the limitation clause. Hite says it will take 32 years to get the royalties owed her now, and the book is still selling well worldwide. She says McMillan has not put her money in escrow and is profiting from using it. Hite wants the limitation clause voided and her earnings now held, plus interest, plus the profits McMillan has made on her money and a million dollars in punitive damages, saying the company "willfully, wantonly, and maliciously violated its obligations and duties" to her by using her money. McMillan has no comment. Irwin Karp, counsel for the Authors League of America, says changes in tax laws made the limitation clause useless well before the agreement was made. In an interview, Hite said, "It's a tax- free, interest-free, eternal loan. Here I am—me—who had to borrow money from my editor's doorman to write the book, propping up this stupid company." | Jane Fonda , fresh from her campaign against the nuclear power industry, has chosen her next issue: the pay and working conditions of the millions of female clerical workers throughout the country. The presence of the actress at a secretaries' rally in San Francisco drew a crowd of 7,000 and her new film, a comedy to be called Nine to Five, will undoubtedly reach millions with its low-key message calling secretaries and clerical workers to arms. Up to now, few companies have had to worry much about discontent among office workers. But in recent months there have been unmistakable stirrings in this traditionally unorganized and docile work force. The signs of the new militancy include the following: l)or- ganization by the Teamsters Union of 1,900 clerical workers at the University of Chicago, and 2)moves by the Communications Workers of America to organize female clerical workers through existing organizations of working women. The union is also planning to raise the issue of equal pay for comparable work in 1980 contract negotiations with the Bell system. An attempt will be made to bring pay in traditionally female clerical jobs into line with salaries for male janitors and linemen. The issues for clerical workers are the same as those that have always prompted employees to band together, with salaries heading the list of grievances. The average pay for all clerical workers is $8,128 a year, only slightly above the current poverty threshold of $6,800 for a non- farm family of four. A worker with two children earning $130 a week is eligible for food stamps, although entry-level salaries for clerks, receptionists and typists in most industries are below this level. "We feel that a full-time worker should make more than a subsistence wage," says Ellen Cassidy, staff director of a Boston organization called 9 to 5. Women clerical workers are also concerned about the lack of opportunities for promotion and the galling nonprofessional demands of some male bosses. At meetings during National Secretaries Week in April, secretaries complained of employers who, among other things, asked them to clean their dentures and to sew up their trousers—while the latter were still on. One of the most innovative attempts to reach clerical workers has been organized by a national network of 13 organizations, loosely affiliated as the National Association of Working Women, with a total membership of only about 8,000. But they have been able to challenge a number of carefully chosen employers on such issues as equal pay and promotions, partly by petitioning federal and state authorities to enforce existing equal employment statutes. Representatives of the women's groups concede, however, that there are limits to what can be accomplished without the legal right to bargain and to win an enforceable contract, as in union contracts. Maria de Lourdes Pintassilgo has been asked by Portugal's president to form a government and become Portugal's first woman prime minister and the second in Europe. A chemical engineer by profession, Pintassilgo is Portugal's ambassador to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. She has served as Portugal's minister of social affairs and studied women's affairs for the government. She has been active at the top level of international Roman Catholic groups. Pintassilgo will not be forming a government as a party leader. Her task is to form an interim government to prepare for autumn elections. The only remaining scheduled showing of Judy Chicago 's art work, The Dinner Party, after its premiere at the San Francisco Museum &^rNw*i&^*i2 °f Modern Art 1 (SFMMA), has been cancelled. A terse press release from the University of Rochester's Memorial Art Gallery (June 20) cited "conflicts of policy concerning programming and fund- raising by the artist and problems of financing the exhibition after cost estimates had increased dramatically over original estimates." The Dinner Party, a multimedia collaboration of 200 women to Chicago's designs, broke records at the SFMMA where it opened in March. Over 10,000 people attended the opening weekend. 90,000 saw it during the three-month exhibit. The Museum took in over $58,000, recouping all its costs for the show, an unusual phenomenon even for the most prestigious shows. Henry Hopkins, director of SFMMA said it was "bizarre that it is not going on to other museums." He has been active since the Seattle and Rochester cancellations trying to set up another exhibition; "there is some hope Brooklyn Museum will take it," he said. Brooklyn Museum director Michael Botwinick said last week, "We are interested. We just found out the show was available, and a quiet, small, hopeful examination of the prospects is going on." The Dinner Party had been scheduled in Seattle for late July through September, but was cancelled, according to Charles Cowles, curator of modern art at the Modern Art Pavillion of the Seattle Art Museum, because of lack of space. The Rochester cancellation was an unexpected blow, said Diane Gelon, Chicago's project coordinator. "We had had an informal written agreement for more than a year. Some costs were increasing, because of inflation, but everything seemed to be working out." Rochester's Memorial Art Gallery's acting director Bruce Chambers said, "True, we were just details apart, but I basically felt we would never get together. There was no point in resuming talks." According to Chambers, Rochester has just announced the cancellation there, and letters expressing disappointment are beginning to come in. Marleah Drexler Mac- Dougal a fiber artist from Washington, I D.C, has moved her studio to 11685 I Alief Road, No. 7 in j Houston. MacDougal has worked in the J Textile Department I of the Smithsonian j Institution and studied feltmaking in Turkey, Afghanistan and India. She has a master's degree in textiles and related arts and has taught in two California colleges. Professionally Yours Executive Search Consultants, the first firm in Houston to specialize in placing professional women, have opened new offices at 2640 Fountainview, announced owner Jean Gandy. UTeG Barter Associates is a group of people joining together to fight inflation by exchanging services and merchandise. Members exchange their professional services, trades, or talents. Annual membership ($50) gives immediate access to services rendered by UTeG members up to that amount. A member who normally charges $25 per hour and works two hours on another member's request will be credited $50. No money changes hands. Merchants receive full retail value for merchandise bartered to members. Each month, UTeG will send out an updated list of members and their professions or trades. Work vouchers will be supplied for transactions. Members also receive a monthly statement of credits and debits. For information call T. J. Kay at 729-5972 or write UTeG Associates, 10913 Chimney Rock, Houston, Tx. Send information for this column to Newsmakers, Houston Breakthrough, P. O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH JULY/AUGUST 1979