Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08
Page 2
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 2. July 1979 - August 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1511.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979 - August 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1511

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08 - Page 2, July 1979 - August 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1537/show/1511.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-07 - 1979-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date July 1979 - August 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_552ab.jpg
Transcript letters Share your views with other readers. We welcome letters for publication. Letters must be signed and marked with a return address. Mail to Letters, Houston Breakthrough, P. O. Box 88072, Houston, Texas 77004. "A policy of corporal punishment invites abuse ..." Other Breakthrough readers probably sat speechless with anger and sadness after reading Melanie Mayeaux's fine story ("Violence in School", June 1979) about blind, four-year-old Ramon Couture and the principal at New Caney Elementary School, just as I did. As I understand the current system, each independent school district in the state is empowered to formulate their own policy regarding corporal punishment; the ultimate power to limit or prohibit corporal punishment statewide rests with the State Board of Education and the Texas legislature. It is a step that the Texas Education Authority's appointed judge recommended against corporal punishment for special education students in New Caney, but it is apalling that someone, just because he is a school administrator, can abuse a child, undoing the patient hard work of his mother and teacher, and be exempt from dismissal because he "did not violate any existing policy." If anyone else in the community had done this they would have been liable for criminal proceedings. The current policy on corporal punishment invites abuse, and I doubt that it provides much protection for the classroom teacher with a violent or extremely disruptive pupil. It seems we need new rulings to better protect Texas school children. With Ramon's story fresh in mind it is a good time for us to write our state legislators and the State Board of Education (201 East 11th Street, Austin 78701-best to put "re: corporal punishment" or some such at the top of your letter). ALISON FRANKS "Are we planning wars for the battlefields of the 1980's?" I am not sure you would be interested in printing something as controversial as this letter I wrote to the editors of Science magazine last year. They have not printed this letter (as of this date). It would seem to me that if this "war expectation" pattern (see letter below) is ever to be broken up, it is up to women to do so, with the help of the few reasonable men in the world who do not enjoy even the thought of rattling swords. I enjoy your publication. B. J. KOLENDA Ms. Christine Karlik Science 1515 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 15 August 1978 I am responding to the brief article, written by Nicholas Wade, about the XM-1 battle tank that appeared in Science (August 11, 19 78). The article mentions ". . . a weapon that it hopes will dominate the battlefields of the 1980's." (See The Violent Sex, page 18). Obviously, this statement assumes that there will be battlefields in the 1980's. Are we planning wars for the 1980's? How does this type of attitude, so widespread among males around the world, foster efforts to initially exhaust all alternatives to violent aggression and to achieve eventual world peace? This attitude that "war is inevitable in every lifetime"(passed from father to son, teacher to pupil-an assumption similar to that of assuming that baseball and football "are forever") is primarily responsible for the continuation of politically aggressive thought leading inevitably to war and resulting in the progressive policy of "survival of the unfittest. "A large portion of the fittest and most intelligent males of each generation is killed on battlefields. If the world we live in needs to kill off its surplus males, why not institute a cost-efficient and much more humane method of doing it? It would be less expensive to the world and would avoid the endangering depletion of resources if that same percentage of each generation of males was [aborted] . . . [ Therefore] they would not need food and schooling for 18 to 24 years before they are killed with very expensive weapons such as the XM-1. Ten thousand abortions surely are much less expensive than one XM-1 tank. The humane and monetary benefits would be everbroadening. For instance, if there were no armies . . . there would be thousands fewer conceived, unwanted, and abandoned bastard orphans for the world to feed, school, and [eventually] send out to be killed on the battlefields . . . If you think this letter is submitted in jest, you are mistaken. I have never been more earnest about a suggestion in my life. Ms. B. J. Kolenda The women of Off the Wall Productions are pleased to announce that their fund-raising concert featuring Sharon Lauder, Kay Gardner and Mojo (June 16) raised $720 for the Houston Area Wo men's Shelter for Abused Women. We hope to see you at our next production. THE WOMEN OF OTWP "When will men do something besides extend congratulations? I would rather have President Roosevelt say one word to Congress in favor of amending the Constitution to give women suffrage than to praise me endlessly!" It is well to remember these words of Susan B. Anthony as the coin bearing her likeness passes through all our hands. It will be necessary to work very hard to get male state legislators to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment. Let's not let the Susan B. Anthony coin be but another of the empty gestures Anthony so scorned! H. KATHLEEN GRESHAM "Miss Piggy is everything we don't want our daughters to be." Last night I took my ten-year-old niece to see The Muppet Movie and I was appalled at the blatant sexism in the film. Naturally, the main character/hero was a male figure, Kermit the Frog, who goes through a series of marvelous adventures on his way to seek fame and fortune in Hollywood. Of the 20 or so characters in the film, three were female. These were portrayed as submissive, non- opinionated and stupid! Miss Piggy was the only one of the three who had what could be considered a major role. The audience first meets her as the winner of a beauty contest at a country fair. She is beautiful (for a pig), but of course, as the stereotype goes-"you can't be both beautiful and intelligent at the same time"-therefore, the big- busted, blonde Miss Piggy is an idiot. She leaves all of the decisions to the hero, Kermit. Waiting for the HUMOR to shine through her demeaning role, I was saddened to find there was none. Later, it is revealed that she possesses fantastic strength and saves Kermit from disaster, but instead of self-recognition of her talent, she retreats back into her old personality as stupid and submissive. She is everything we don't want our daughters to be. Let me emphasize that there was no humor or saving grace in her character. The other two female muppets were almost unidentifiable in that they had very few speaking parts. One, a chicken, had a tremendous (and I am being facetious here) line when she went "ga ga" over the present of balloons that her boyfriend bought for her. The rest of the time she was mute. The other was a member of a rock band who seemed to be too stoned or loaded to make much sense. Of course, at the end of the film Kermit the Frog achieves his goal by becoming rich and famous and through him all of the other characters are able to, also, including Miss Piggy, the chicken, and the band member. It is a very sad thing that children (and adults) must constantly be subjected to stereotypes and it is especially worsened by films such as this one. One would think that after all that has been said and done to stop racism and sexism in our society, it is still being produced anew in our children's films. In The Muppet Movie the redeeming value of the humor done by the cameo appearances of Madelaine Kahn, Cloris Leachman, Carol Kane, Steve Martin and the rest was not enough to take the taste out of my mouth. I strongly suggest that if the children of feminist mothers, sisters, aunts, etc. do want to see the film-if they haven't already by now-then, some time should be spent preparing the child to watch for these discrepancies in the female characters' roles and in pointing out these stereotypes. RUDYNE M. GRIGAR "How wonderful to see the portrayal of a competent woman!" I wish to report a significant, though small stride forward in the way women are portrayed in the movies. It is in the film Alien, a science fiction shocker with few redeeming qualities. Except that the last person left alive - the one who courageously and imaginatively destroys the monster — is a woman, played by Sigourney Weaver. She portrays a competent, aggressive, efficient woman without the coldness which screenwriters and directors have laid on women in the past. Even two years ago this role with no changes would have been played by a man. That Weaver is a woman is immaterial to the plot. She is not a sex object and shows no skin except near the end, when the lack of clothes makes her appear more vulnerable to the menacing creature. How wonderful to see the portrayal of a competent woman! For this alone I recommend the film. LYNNE MUTCHLER Thanks so much for your support of The Dinner Party. (See "The Dinner Party" by Nancy Lane Fleming and " Will Houston Host the The Dinner Party" by Dianne Brown, June 1979). I just wanted to share with you the latest problems we are facing in getting the exhibition shown. (News clippings reported that the only remaining scheduled showing has been cancelled. See Newsmakers page 4). We will keep you posted on the latest news. We are getting a flood of letters from people around the country wanting to see the exhibition in their area. I hope that we can bring it together for everyone in Texas. In sisterhood. DIANE GELON Project Administrator Through the Flower Santa Monica, CA July/August 1979 Vol. 4, no. 6 Advertising Shirley Bryson, Melissa Hauge Art Carolyn Cosgriff, Ernie Shawver Circulation Blanca Balderas, Melissa Hauge, Gloria Jacobs, Thelma Meltzer, Frances Pavlovic, Debra Thornton Copy Editors Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Susan Godwin, H. Kathleen Gresham, Melissa Hauge, L. Kay Little, Hattie Thurlow Hildegard Warner, Red Zenger Editorial Board Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff Office Janice Blue, Melissa Hauge Photographers Janice Blue, Tony Bullard, Bill Dennis, Theresa Di Menno, Virginia Myers, Danette Wilson, Janice Yeager Jim Youngmeyer Production Janice Blue, Dianne Brown, Carolyn Cosgriff, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Dee Dee Hunter, Sue Maney, Karen Spearman Proofreading Gabrielle Cosgriff Typesetters Mary Lou Chollar, Mary Fouts, Sue Maney, Lynne Mutchler, Virginia Myers, Ernie Shawver Second-class postage paid at Houston, Texas. Houston Breakthrough USPS 413130, is published monthly (except for the bi-monthly issues of July-August and December-January) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004; P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004; Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions are $7 per year, newsstand $1.00 per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Houston Breakthrough, P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH JULY/AUGUST 1979