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Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981
Page 20
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Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981 - Page 20. December 1980 - January 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1226/show/1217.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1980 - January 1981). Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981 - Page 20. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1226/show/1217

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981 - Page 20, December 1980 - January 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1226/show/1217.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1980 - January 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 20
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_566at.jpg
Transcript We entered the new decade as a general circulation newspaper. Our logo "where women are news" now read "it's all news to us". In announcing the new direction our four-year-old feminist publication was taking at a press conference we said, "We felt it was time to acknowledge our growth and the plain fact that men make up a large part of our readership. We want Breakthrough to be a newspaper that will speak to both women and men about issues that affect us all." In line with that decision, we named David Crossley as a new co-editor. In the previous year, we began emphasizing environmental and other urban issues. The Karen Silkwood case and Three Mile Island heightened our consciousness about the dangers of nuclear energy. Crossley was editor of Houston City magazine under publisher Francois de Menil when de Menil pulled a story on the South Texas Nuclear Plant from the magazine's May and June 1979 issues. Crossley co-authored the piece with Andrew Sansom. De Menil told KPRC-TV that he didn't want a magazine that terrorizes people and makes them want to leave the community. ** T1 en Texas Monthly reported that "de MenH thought the story might embarrass his friend and neighbor, George Brown, founder of Brown and Root, which is building the nuclear plant." The article documented construction flaws in the building of the STNP located in Wallis, Texas, 45 aerial miles from downtown Houston. Crossley said, "The story exists by itself and is apart from my position as editor. I wanted to get it out to the people of Houston." In June 1979, we published the story in full in Breakthrough. Soon after these events, Crossley was fired. (As a Breakthrough editor, Crossley was our chief photographer and shot most of our covers the past two years, including this one, photo 5). We began carrying more interviews this year with community figures like Ryan Trimble (photo 3), a founder of Liberty Hall, union doctor Sharon Itaya, political analyst Richard Murray, artist Leo Tanguma, and city council- woman Eleanor Tinsley (photo 6). Last March we ran the first in-depth interview with the newly-appointed police chief, B.K. Johnson, before his con firmation by city council. We also did several people in the street interviews on subjects as controversial as the draft (photo 1). The draft story was the first assignment undertaken by Rose Wright, our first student intern from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Rose stayed with us for two semesters. Later came Jane Collings (summer intern) and Virginia Rail (fall intern). Breakthrough benefited from the vitality, intelligence, and commitment of these women. As you might know, we have a two-person staff, so their share of responsibility was immense. Our June issue was devoted to the controversy over Channel 8's cancellation of Death of a Princess (photo 4). Of 278 public television stations in the country, KUHT-TV was the only outlet in a major market not to broadcast the film. The same day Gertrude Barnstone filed suit as a channel 8 subscriber to force Channel 8 to show Death of a Princess. Breakthrough received a package in the mail, postmarked Boston. It was a videotape of Death of a Princess. A cryptic message read "Make good use of this film." We organized a showing at the Rice University Media Center for journalists with Sigma Delta Chi, the local chapter of the national professional journalists' association. We aired the tape at exactly 8 pm on May 12, the same time it was to air nationally. Barnstone and her attorney, David Berg, participated in an open forum at the film's end. 20 OUSTON BREAKTHROUGH