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Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981
Page 14
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Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981 - Page 14. December 1980 - January 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1226/show/1211.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1980 - January 1981). Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1226/show/1211

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981 - Page 14, December 1980 - January 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1226/show/1211.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough December-January 1981
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1980 - January 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_566an.JPG
Transcript 1977 Redbook magazine found in a survey of 9000 women that 88% of them experienced some form of sexual harassment on on the job. A few months later, writer Karen Barrett documented a case of sexual abuse in the City of Houston's Community Development Division. Several women employees accused their boss, Tom Neely, of sexual harassment. After an internal investigation, Neely received only a reprimand. To our surprise, no other news media picked up on our story. A month later in an editorial, "Sounds of Si!ence," we asked readers to consider the fact that a city emplo yee was recently fired for the improper use of a city vehicle, yet Neely received only a written reprimand for his abusive treatment. "It is staggering to think that our city officials consider city property more important than their female workers." The only city official to take an interest in the case was the City Women's Advocate, Nikki Van Hightower, who conducted her own investigation. In correspondence with John Castillo, the CDD director (now an executive assistant to Mayor McConn), Van Hightower wrote; "Your response has been a 'a slap on the wrist' and transfers the guilt to the women, the victims of the offense." Her defense of the women in this incident and other public criticisms of sexism in city government soon put Van Hightower at odds with the city council. A month later (March 5) she spoke before a Women's Day Rally in Sam Houston park. The following Wednesday, seven citizens objected before city council to her appearance at the rally as well as her support of both the ERA and a women's right to choose abortion. That afternoon, the city council voted to lower her salary from over $18,000 to one dollar a year. In a matter of hours, hundreds of people appeared before city council and attended a support rally but the council turned around and voted to abolish the Women's Advocate position. After adjournment, Mayor Fred Hofheinz hired her as an executive assistant with the same duties (see illustration 7). The Women's Advocate story was the dominant women's story in 1977, surpassed only by the 30,000 women and men who descended on Houston for the IWY conference, November 19—21. For three days, Breakthrough went daily. (At our five year birthday party for Ms. magazine that July, Gloria Steinem encouraged us to take on an IWY conference daily similar to one published at Mexico City in 1975). Planning for it began early that summer. By the convention's end, almost 100 people—13 reporter/photographer teams worked with us to gather news and distribute 30,000 issues daily. Our plan of action was to give responsible coverage. In other words, to avoid another Mexico City. Our political cartoon in the first conference issue (see illustration 4 ) was directed at the press. With 2000 journalists in search of a story: they could focus on the issues or the dissent. We carried background stories to show that the dissent was not woman- against-woman, but rather right wing against the progressive forces. Right wing demonstrators tried to disrupt the first meeting of the IWY national commissioners in Houston in July, 1977 (see photo of Bella Abzug 2 ). Despite rumors of impending confrontations between anti and pro ERA groups, the biggest news was trying to find a hotel room. (See photo5). People waited for six hours or more at the Hyatt Regency, renamed the Riot Hegency, blocking doors and fencing in mounds of luggage. But at the convention press room Gabrielle Cosgriff and Cheryl Knott said their biggest thrill was seeing reporters from Japan, Sweden, France and all over the country, read Breakthrough stories to their news desks. No more Mexico Citys. 14 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH