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Pointblank Times 1976-06
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Pointblank Times 1976-06 - Page 6. July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/12/show/5.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1976). Pointblank Times 1976-06 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/12/show/5

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times 1976-06 - Page 6, July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/12/show/5.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Pointblank Times 1976-06
Date July 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_420f.jpg
Transcript BURNING OUT "Burning out" is a hazard associated with all social activism. But the casualty rate within the Women's Movement has been remarkably high. We can look, for example, at two of the most well-known Feminists. Jill Johnston, no longer writing for The Village Voice, is struggling to overcome a recent breakdown* Ti-Grace Atkinson," "now living on welfare, has almost totally withdrawn from involvement with the broader movement and with the individual Feminists who were formerly close to her. Because these two were more or less media stars, their burning out is publicly evident. There are, however, many other women activists, not vaunted by the media, unknown except within their own smaller groups and communities, who are just as much casualties of the burning out process as Johnston and Atkinson. A case in point: a friend of mine has been directing a Woman's Studies program at a large state university for the past eighteen months. Beleaguered and exhausted, she has just resigned her position: she looks forward to a period of non-involvement until (if) she regains her energy and enthusiasm. Or another illustration: a bright student of mine, the strongest Feminist organizer on our campus for the past year, is dropping out of all activity and transferring to another school where, as she puts, she can "sleep a lot and keep a low profile.1' In twelve months, her seemingly tireless energy has simply given out. Part of the blame for this debilitation, to be sure, must be placed on a hostile culture which holds up to constant scrutiny and ridicule the activities of the national Feminist leaders, and which—with equal mercilessness--criticizes, misrepresents and demoralizes Feminists working on the local levels. Since the male society as a whole possesses the power, controls the media, owns the access to money and manipulates the educational system, their vindictive onslaught will continue. And that is a fact of life we all have to live with. We have to be prepared to be hated, to be threatened, and to lose "credibility" in the traditional community. However, I do not believe that most of us burn out because of this external pressure. We expect the barrage: we entered the Movement knowing at least some of the repercussions. No, part of the blame for burning out rests upon that Movement and some of our "sisters" in it. To some extent, perhaps, this was due to our initial idealism and its later backlash. As the second wave of Feminism swept the country in the 1960's, many of us felt that the revolution was at hand. What we realize now is that we are engaged in a long, ongoing process of slow, difficult change—change which will be made only reluctantly by a male-controlled culture. But in the course of discovering this, many Feminists found that, although they had been prepared for a swift sprint to victory, they had no reserve left to continue the longer struggle. Consequence? Burned out and, more often than not, disillusioned. Unfortunately, some of that disillusionment had fed upon the energies of other sisters, destroying them through the monstrous system of "trashing." I have seen "sisters" at Feminists meetings delight in sapping the enthusiasm of other women. I have seen meeting after meeting end in a shambles of wounded hearts and bruised minds. We are simply doing The Man's job for him as we thus wipe out the motivation of women who could lead and organize, who still have the freshness of vision. We are involved in a struggle which requires marathon discipline and careful expenditure of energy over a period of many years. It is, truly, a life's work. Yet it is not only by trashing that we aid the burning out process; it is also by our incessant demands upon one another. As sisters, we have often not been kind: we have demanded of each other a superhuman, twenty-four-hour-a-day, fifty-two weeks a year dedication. No margin is allowed, no tolerance granted, for individual weariness, fati- que, need for privacy. Sometimes I think we measure each other against some phantom Wonder Woman. To be constantly on guard, to have one's consciousness continually