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57th Annual NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships
Page 7
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National Collegiate Athletic Association. 57th Annual NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships - Page 7. March 27 - 29, 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/428/show/351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 27 - 29, 1980). 57th Annual NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships - Page 7. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/428/show/351

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, 57th Annual NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships - Page 7, March 27 - 29, 1980, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/428/show/351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title 57th Annual NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 27 - 29, 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Swimming
  • Diving
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
  • Harvard University
Subject. Geographic (TGN)
  • Cambridge, Massachusetts
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 84 page document
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 25
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
File name champ_201306_028_008.jpg
Transcript THE BEARS HAVE THE CROWN ... BUT ALL EYES ARE ON THE GATORS by Bill Bell Statistical Editor Swimming World Magazine The United States may be a non-participant at the Moscow Olympic Games this summer but the world will certainly be coming to Harvard's Blodgett Pool starting today. While perhaps not exactly one hundred and ten percent accurate (to borrow George Allen's favorite phrase), the above rather well sums up the extremely high caliber of competition expected at this 57th annual NCAA Division I Swimming & Diving Championship. When the NCAAs were last held at an Eastern institution (Brown in 1976) it was also an Olympic year, and the performances there were truly Olympian in quality. Five individual American, U.S. Open and national collegiate records tumbled beneath the waves of the Smith Swimming Center that third weekend in March, and a not inconsiderable number of those winners parlayed an NCAA victory into an Olympic gold medal at Montreal four months later. The site of this year's title meet, Blodgett Pool, is barely two years old yet has served as the locale for several significant national and international competitions, including the second Women's International Cup meet in January of 1979; and the Eastern Seaboard Championships a year ago, coincidentally won by Harvard for the first time. The pool is 50 meters by 25 yards with the short course end a minimum seven feet in depth, making it one of the finest and fastest swimming facilities in the Northeast. Seating is available for 1,500 spectators. The multi- megabuck aquatic facility is, of course, the home pool for Coach Joe Bernal's rapidly rising Harvard Crimson team, whose latest and certainly most noteworthy accomplishments, include a dual meet victory over perennial Big 10 champ Indiana last month and a successful defense of the Eastern Seaboard title earlier this month. It's been said (not at all inaccurately) that winning an NCAA Championship is tougher than winning an Olympic gold medal. For one thing, there are only six finalists in the NCAA meet versus eight in most other international competitions, including the Olympics, World Championships, Pan-Ams, etc. Secondly, the qualifying standards just to make it in to the NCAAs, let alone enter the finals, are equally challenging. The meet is designed so that only the fastest swimmers compete — no dawdlers need apply. The American collegiate swimming program has long been a breeding ground for the most talented domestic and foreign aquatic stars, and 1980 is no exception. At this year's NCAAs expect to see the most successful competitors from nearly a dozen nations outside the U.S.A., including Brazilians, Nicaraguans, Norwegians, Puerto Ricans, Canadians, Swedes, Frenchmen, Mexicans, Dutchmen, Colombians, Ecuadorians, Australians, New Zealanders and Englishmen, plus a native Samoan who now lives in California and attends college in Florida — Miami's sensational diver, Greg Louganis. In fact, with the exception of a handful of top Russians, East Germans, Czechs and Hungarians, a Brazilian (Djan Madruga), an Australian (Mark Kerry) and a Canadian (Graham Smith), the world's greatest male swimmers will be competing at Harvard. Madruga and Kerry, who swam for Counsilman's Indiana squad last season, have opted to sit out the year and train for the Olympics, as has Smith, who was a triple gold medalist last year for Coach Nort Thornton's champion Cal Golden Bears. No Eastern-bloc swimmers have as yet enrolled in American universities although rumor has it that Bernal has been hot on the trail of Soviet double World Champion Vladimir Salnikov for the last several years. With America's presence at Moscow in doubt, many of the more prominent U.S. collegians (and a like number of the leading foreign swimmers) regard this year's NCAA Championships as their short course "Free World Olympics." "I think I'll make an even greater effort to win at Harvard because I probably won't be going to Moscow," states sextuple national collegiate gold medalist Brian Goodell, the mainstay of Coach Ron Ballatore's UCLA squad. "This meet has, I'm sure, taken on added significance for everybody because of the boycott situation and I believe the performances will fulfill everybody's high expectations." Harvard's own Bobby Hackett, runner-up to Goodell last season in both the 500 and 1650 frees and who has, seemingly, been chasing his California foe for gold and glory since the two were high school juniors five years ago, is another top-ranked swimmer who isn't worried about the international situation having an impact on the NCAAs. "I would expect that most of us will be at our emotional 'peak' because for some this meet just might be our 'Olympics'," The Crimson junior believes. "We'll be going all-out to win ... there won't be any 'holding back.' " When Cal's Golden Bears romped to last year's championship at Cleveland State (after having finished third the year before), a milestone of sorts for collegiate swimming was achieved in that it was the third time in as many years a different university had captured the No. 1 ranking. And if Coach Randy Reese's powerful Florida Gators, third-place finishers last season and favored to occupy the "throne" in this first year of the new decade, do in fact accomplish that feat, history will indeed have been made. Never before in 56 years of NCAA championship swimming competition (dating back to 1924) have four different universities won team titles in consecutive years. (Continued on Page 8)