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Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Page 13
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National Collegiate Athletic Association. Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 13. March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/998.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990). Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 13. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/998

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 13, March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/998.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Basketball
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Knoxville, Tennessee
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 166 page document with half-page insert
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 7
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
File name champ_201306_035_014.jpg
Transcript Hoosier Hysteria" reigns in March, where Indiana faithful look forward to postseason play. places where "March Madness" has long been a way of life. In recent years, however, thanks mainly to television, the disease has become national in scope. Even in Texas, heretofore known as a football state, basketball has developed a following that is just as rabid and zany as anything you will find in, say, Louisville, Kentucky, or Syracuse, New York, to mention a couple of hoops citadels. The essence of "March Madness," when you get right down to it, is anticipation. It begins on the first day of practice and grows steadily through the preseason exhibitions, the December non-conference games, the conference regular-season schedule, and the postseason conference tournaments. And the most important question, really, is not who is No. 1, but who is No. 64, and that is not answered until the Sunday before the NCAA championship begins, when the Division I Men's Basketball Committee announces the 64-team field, pairings, and seedings. This announcement used to be a routine, run-of-the-mill sort of thing. In recent years, however, as the popularity of the championship has increased, it has become a full-fledged media event, as certified by the presence of Brent Musburger and Billy Packer of CBS. And as soon as the identity of the 64th team is revealed, the squawking begins from the teams with decent records who did not get a bid. In 1987, Louisville coach Denny Crum, whose team was the defending national champion, was livid that his team did not even get a chance to defend its title. Crum argued that Louisville deserved a bid on the basis that it had a winning record, albeit barely, against a tough schedule. But the point was, the Cardinals had not held their own against that schedule. And when they got blown out by Memphis State on their home floor in the championship game of the Metro Conference tournament, the committee had all the justification it needed to give the Cards the thumb. Even in Texas, heretofore known as a football state, basketball has developed a following that is just as rabid and zany as anything you will find in, say, Louisville, Kentucky, or Syracuse, New York, to mention a couple of hoops citadels. By the arrival of what has come to be known as "Selection Sunday," it is fairly easy to pick 50 or 55 of the teams that will get bids. It is those last few that give the committee 90 percent of its headaches. All sorts of factors, everything from strength of schedule to winning margins, are poured into the NCAA computers. Even so, the final decision is made by humans, and there is never going to be a year when the committee is going to make everyone completely happy. Besides picking the 64 teams, the pairings and seedings also have grown more complicated through the years, especially when the committee decided to never let a team play on its home floor. Many thought that would discourage universities from wanting to play host to the early rounds and the regionals, but that has not happened. There is so much prestige and recognition involved, not to mention money, that everybody wants to be as heavily involved with (continued on page 16) 12