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Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Page 11
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National Collegiate Athletic Association. Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 11. March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 28, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/996.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990). Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 11. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/996

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 11, March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 28, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/996.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Basketball
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Knoxville, Tennessee
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 166 page document with half-page insert
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 7
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
File Name champ_201306_035_012.jpg
Transcript College Basketball Hits Fever Pitch If It Is Hoops Hysteria, It Must Be March By WILLIAM F. REED Sports Illustrated March Madness, that incurable disease peculiar to hoopaholics, actually begins on October 15, the first day the NCAA allows college basketball teams to practice. It builds during the late fall and winter, making its victims increasingly feverish and irrational, until finally, on or around March 1, it is a national epidemic. Only when the calendar flips to April does it begin to recede. However, even during the spring and summer, the disease often flares up, generally around all-star games or the mention of recruiting news, which causes the poor hoopaholic to begin drooling and foaming at the mouth. We mention all this as a warning, sort of a public service, if you will. If you do not want to become afflicted with March Madness, then you had better plan on spending the month out of the country. Of course, given the way basketball has become such a popular international game, you may have trouble finding a place where you can get completely away from dribbling, dunking, and Dickie, as in Vitale. Vitale, the peripatetic television analyst, is the perfect example of March Madness in its most virulent form. Look at the perspiration gleaming on his bald pate. Notice the way he has absolutely lost contact with reality. Listen to the hysterical, nonsensical way he goes on and on and on about.. .about what? Nobody in their right mind can really understand what the guy is raving about, but, then, whoever said hoopaholics were in their right mind? And then there is this editor for a perfectly respectable national sports publication based in the Midwest. He comes from North Carolina, as he insists on telling you every five minutes, and he thinks Dean Smith is directly responsible for having the sky painted Carolina blue. He loves to talk about Dean, which always comes out "Day-uhn" in his Carolina accent, as in "Didja see thet Day-uhn won again?" This guy loves the Tar Heels, but mostly he loves hoops. One year he videotaped more than 200 games and kept score for every one. And he not only admitted it, Billy Packer provides precise insight into postseason play. he was proud of it! Bragged about it! By now you are getting the idea, right? There are a bunch of sick puppies out there. There is another guy who is a big Kentucky fan. Back in 1978, when the Wildcats were on their way to the NCAA championship, he spent an evening listening to the radio broadcast of the team's victory over Tennessee in Knoxville. This may not sound strange until you know that he was in Denver at the time. He called Louisville, had his parents put the radio next to the phone, and listened to the entire game. He refused to say what his telephone bill was. And here is another Kentucky story for you. This season the Wildcats' new coach, Rick Pitino, decided to do his postgame radio show at courtside, with the audio piped over the Rupp Arena public-address system. This was for the benefit, mainly, of the players' friends and family, who did not get to hear the show while they were hanging around and waiting for the players to come out of the locker room. But it caught on so quickly that soon more than 10,000 fans were hanging around for the radio show, which is more than the population of a lot of towns in the state. Indiana is another place where "March Madness" is out of control, except there it is known as "Hoosier Hysteria." No other state loves basketball in all its various forms quite like Indiana, where it is not uncommon for high schools to have gyms with 8,000 or more seats, and to fill them every game. In Indiana, the only thing bigger than the state high school tournament is Bob Knight, the coach of the Indiana Hoosiers. Knight has gotten into his share of scrapes over the years — every hoopaholic can recite them by heart — but the fans in Indiana always forgive him because they know he is essentially one of them — a conservative, smalltown guy who believes completely in winning through hard work, honesty, and the man-to-man defense. The crowds at Indiana, while noisy and knowledgeable, are not as outrageous as they are at, say, Duke, where the students find relief from their rigorous academic curriculum by making absolute fools of themselves at basketball games. The Duke students are clever, irreverent, sarcastic, witty, and biting, but they usually stop just short of bad taste, even where North Carolina and "Day-uhn" Smith are concerned. The crowds at Indiana, while noisy and knowledgeable, are not as outrageous as they are at, say, Duke, where the students find relief from their rigorous academic curriculum by making absolute fools of themselves at basketball games. Earlier this season, of course, the Dookies did get a little out of control when it came to Georgia Tech's Dennis Scott. When the once-chubby Scott was introduced, they pelted the floor with doughnuts, cookies, and other food, as if to remind Scott of his bad old habits. "Certainly there's something to be said for being funny and creative and cute," said Fred Barakat, the Atlantic Coast Conference's supervisor of basketball officials. "But there's a fine line there. My concern is the physical welfare of the players." Up until now we have been talking about 10