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Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Page 157
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National Collegiate Athletic Association. Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 157. March 15 and 17, 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 15 and 17, 1990). Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 157. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1135

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 157, March 15 and 17, 1990, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 15 and 17, 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Basketball
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Subject. Geographic (TGN)
  • Knoxville, Tennessee
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 166 page document with half-page insert
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 7
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 157
File name champ_201306_035_151.jpg
Transcript Athletes Are Students First Universities Are Taking The Term "Student-Athlete" Seriously By NATALIE MEISLER Denver Post When a basketball team's stay on the road is unexpectedly extended for more than two weeks, calling home for clean laundry might seem like a top priority. In Seton Hall University's case last March, an urgent phone call was placed from the second-round championship win in Tbcson, Arizona, to the school's home in New Jersey requesting another academic tutor. For "The Hall," the layover in Tucson en route to the West regional in Denver meant quality time in study hall. Lest anyone forget the "student" part of the student-athlete byword established by the NCAA, the Pirates spent two hours-a-day with their tutors and textbooks. The payback to the academic counseling department came when part of the tournament revenue was funneled into another full-time academic position. For years, college administrators and athletics departments paid lip service to the term "student-athlete." Horror stories emerged about athletes who made it through four years of college despite functional illiteracy. Now administrators are paying more than lip service. Academic support programs are becoming a budgetary priority. "The presidents have passed the word to the athletics directors to emphasize academics," said University of Colorado President E. Gordon Gee, one of many presidents at the forefront of boosting the academic quality of life for athletes. "It is time for colleges and universities throughout the nation to remember that all athletes are students first," Gee wrote in The NCAA News. "Only then can we instill a competitive spirit in its proper context." His coaches get the message. A promising freshman tailback was held out of Colorado's spring game for missing a study table. The message from football coach Bill McCartney: "If you're not going to be a student, don't bother showing up as an athlete." Around the country, classroom and study table attendance receive the same mandatory status as punctuality for team practice. At the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, football coach Tom Osborne would not play Colorado president E. Gordon Gee and many other university leaders are serious about emphasizing academics as the top priority. in the 1983 Kickoff Classic unless the university agreed to put the entire $600,000 payment towards an academic facility to benefit all the department's student-athletes. Private contributions matched the Kickoff Classic proceeds and another expansion to the facility was scheduled for completion December 1. Cornhusker student-athletes have a computer laboratory, a vast tutorial staff and their own career counselor. "We treat all athletes the same, it doesn't matter if he or she is on scholarship or a walk-on," said Dr. Roger Grooters, Nebraska's director of academic programs. "We have 600 student-athletes here; we're larger than some of our academic departments." With the national controversy over the admission of Proposition 48 athletes who fall below minimum grade point or college board standards, an intensified effort has focused on helping the student-athlete without adequate high school academic preparation. Seton Hall's Anthony Avent was a casein-point during the West regional. The sophomore forward came off the bench to lead the Pirates to an upset over the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Avent, from Newark, New Jersey, sat out the previous season because of Proposition 48. When Avent was mobbed by reporters after the game, Seton Hall academic advisor Robin Cunningham spread the word that Avent made the Dean's list as a freshman. "I wasn't only playing hard for myself and Seton Hall but for all the guys in Newark," Avent said. "There are little kids who look up at role models. You have to let them know it can be done." Cunningham was the first woman to earn an athletics scholarship at Seton Hall, lettering in three sports. She runs a tough program for all of Seton Hall's student- athletes, recognizing the school's recruiting base comes from inner-city areas such as Avent's prep experience in Newark. "All the "D" student lacks is discipline in academics," Cunningham said. "They have the discipline in athletics, but have no idea how to make good decisions in academics. You give them a disciplined teaching structure and they can make good decisions. "It is time for colleges and universities throughout the nation to remember that all athletes are students first...Only then can we instill a competitive spirit in its proper context." — Colorado President E. Gordon Gee "I don't blame the kids when they first come here. They just weren't prepared in high school. When they were young the teachers and coaches didn't steer them into academics more." Seton Hall is a private institution with a little more than 8,000 students. Regardless of academic backgrounds, freshmen student-athletes are quickly indoctrinated in the academic rigors of college at large state universities where all students can easily get lost in the numbers. The University of Missouri, Columbia, with an enrollment of more than 23,000, immerses each incoming student-athlete in the "Total Person Program." Every fresh- 154