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Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Page 133
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National Collegiate Athletic Association. Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 133. March 15 and 17, 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1111.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 15 and 17, 1990). Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 133. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1111

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 133, March 15 and 17, 1990, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1111.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 15 and 17, 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Basketball
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Subject. Geographic (TGN)
  • Knoxville, Tennessee
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 166 page document with half-page insert
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 7
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 133
File name champ_201306_035_127.jpg
Transcript Making the Grade Overall, collegiate student-athletes have a higher graduation rate than the rest of the student body By JOHN BARTIMOLE Student-athlete. Often, that term has been the object of disdain and derision, as media and fans bemoan a perceived contradiction in the title given to those who play intercollegiate sports while pursuing a college education. In reality, however, it turns out the Division I student-athletes have a slightly higher overall graduation rate than their non-playing counterparts — and the gap widens at the Division II and Division m levels. The findings are a result of a survey conducted by the NCAA reflecting the graduation rates of freshmen entering the 1982-83 academic year for a five- year period ending September 1, 1987. Specifically, the median graduation rate for all students at Division I colleges was 47.8 percent, while recruited student-athletes had a rate of 48 percent. In Division I, the graduation rate for all students was 49.6 percent, while the student-athletes had a slightly lower median of 45.5 percent. Division H student-athletes had a 45 percent graduation rate, compared to 36.5 percent for all students; and Division III boasted a 56 percent graduation median, compared to 50 percent for all students. And the best, says Ursula R. Walsh, NCAA director of research and data processing, is yet to come. "These statistics do not yet reflect the impact of Proposition 48, which was adopted in 1986, and the satisfactory progress rule, which went into effect in 1985," she says. "This, actually, is a worst-case scenario and we expect these graduation rates for athletes to improve as a result of those pieces of legislation." Mary Jane Telford, the head coach of the St. Bonaventure University women's basketball team, has a unique perspective on what it takes for a student-athlete to successfully balance sports and academics. Before the Lady Bonnies jumped to Division I in 1986, Telford spent 12 years in the university's admissions office, then resigned her position as associate director of admissions to devote her full time to coaching, which she had previously performed on a part-time basis. "Many athletes take a bad rap because of a few who grab the headlines with their off- the-field misdeeds," she says. "Most athletes are serious students and are good college citizens. The perception that a student-athlete can't be a good student is simply untrue." Telford, whose Lady Bonnies boast a 100 percent graduation rate since the program's inception, says the student-athlete has some advantages the average student does not enjoy. "There's the coach, who acts as an overseer, or the surrogate parent," she says. "Regular students may enter college and be on their own for the first time and think, T can do this assignment later on,' because he or she doesn't really know how to handle all the free time. "The student-athlete, on the other hand, probably must participate in a preseason conditioning program, attend study halls and has a coach or someone who's making sure he or she is going to classes and doing homework." Walsh adds that student-athletes have two other edges that may not be enjoyed by all other students. "There's a tremendous motivation for student-athletes to stay in college so they can play sports," she says, "and then there's the additional financial aid the stu dent-athletes enjoy." Telford agrees with Walsh's observation that Proposition 48 will continue to enhance the graduation rate of student-athletes. "That's the first step in making our young people realize they have to do the academic work if they want to compete and stay in college," she says. Walsh adds that the trend among colleges is to make sure student-athletes have as positive a college experience as possible — and that includes academics. For example, Howard Schnellenberger, head football coach at the University of Louisville, announced that players will have to maintain a "C" average to remain on the team. Additionally, the University of Kentucky received a grant to develop a unique computer system that tracks the progress of student-athletes in academics and athletics. And in Florida, the Board of Regents adopted a rule requiring the state's universities to monitor the class attendance of student-athletes, forbidding those who do not attend from participating in athletics events. The result of all this, says Telford, is that "student-athletes are being held responsible for their academic progress." And that progress, as noted in the NCAA study, is progressing nicely.^ 130