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Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Page 85
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National Collegiate Athletic Association. Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 85. March 15 and 17, 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1064.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 15 and 17, 1990). Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 85. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1064

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 85, March 15 and 17, 1990, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1064.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 15 and 17, 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Basketball
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Subject. Geographic (TGN)
  • Knoxville, Tennessee
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 166 page document with half-page insert
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 7
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 85
File name champ_201306_035_080.jpg
Transcript his game," Steitz recalled. "And one Division I coach from the East called me an idiot." "It's a step backward," noted Louisville coach Denny Crum. "We just had a year of chaos," said Duke's Mike Krzyzewski at the time. "Now, we're introducing chaos." "I think you should get three points for a lay up, rather than three points for a perimeter shot," voiced Georgetown's John Thompson. And some of the other things the coaches and writers were saying about Steitz and his three-point baby had better be left unprinted. But after the first year of the rule, the coaches changed their feelings about the new bonus bomb. Suddenly, 80 percent of the college coaches were in favor of it. Even Indiana's Bob Knight, who wanted Steitz on a chopping block for starting the three-point insanity, had reason to change his mind after that inaugural 1986-87 campaign with the trey. "I remember seeing Bob at the Hall of Fame golf tournament in Springfield just after we passed the rule and he was very much opposed to it," Steitz reflected. "I told him at the time that he'd win the NCAA champioship with it — especially with Steve Alford." "I'm told the three-point field goal revolutionalized the game more than any rule. I personally feel the elimination of the center jump in 1937 was the more dramatic change, but I had nothing to do with that one" Ed Steitz Secretary-Rules Editor NCAA Basketball Rules Committee That next season in the Louisiana Super- dome before 64,959, Indiana beat Syracuse, 74-73, for the NCAA championship on Keith Smart's baseline jumper with four seconds to play. At the post game press conference, Knight acknowledged Steitz as "the father of the three-point basket" and added, "thanks, Ed." All-America guard Steve Alford had more than a little to do with that title victory. He fired a game-high 23 points — and went 7-for-10 from three-point territory. After four years of THE SHOT, Steitz is convinced it is here to stay. "The concept is great — it did what the rule purported to do...open up the game and floor and force teams to play defense away from the basket," he said. "The concept is in concrete, no doubt about it. The only question is the distance (19 feet, 9 inches). There is some feeling about putting the distance back, maybe to the Olympic distance of 20 feet, 6 inches." Back in 1967 in Louisville, after UCLA with a 7-1 center named Lew Alcindor won the NCAA title over Dayton, the rules committee eliminated the dunk. That was the year Steitz joined the committee as assistant ner stall working before a national television audience. That game, Steitz feels, had a lot to do with the arrival of the 45-second clock in the college game. Many things, of course, happened to the game long before Bunn and Steitz had anything to do with it. Dr. Naismith's original 13 rules which were written in 1891 only remotely resemble the game that is played today. Probably the most radical change of the pre-Steitz era was the elimination of the center jump after a basket in 1937. The man behind that move was Oswald Tower, the The height of the goal, which has been set at 10 feet for nearly 100 years, could be the game's next breakthrough, says Steitz. editor to John Bunn. In 1976, Steitz' first as editor, the dunk was returned to the college game. "People felt it was the home run of basketball — it generated excitement," Steitz justified. Then, in 1981, in an effort to speed up the game, the jump ball was eliminated except for the start of the game and overtimes. A more striking change came to the game in 1985 when, according to Steitz, "after 25 years of research," the 45-second clock was adopted. It is said that one of the catalysts of the rule was a well-documented game the year before between No. 1-ranked North Carolina and No. 3 Virginia for the Atlantic Coast Conference championship. North Carolina coach Dean Smith had his storied four-cor- basketball rules interpreter for 44 years and one of the first electees to the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame. According to Steitz, the "Tower Philosophy" best represents what the rules committee believes and supports regarding the officiating of a game. The philosophy is expressed as follows: "It is the purpose of the rules to penalize a player who by reason of an illegal act has placed his opponent to a disadvantage." And Steitz points out that he was not the only rulesmaker to catch flak when a change was made. Tower encouraged his committee to eliminate the center jump despite the protests of Dr. Naismith. The NCAA basketball game has never been better — "it's at its peak," claims 82