Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Page 75
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
National Collegiate Athletic Association. Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 75. March 15 and 17, 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1056.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 15 and 17, 1990). Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 75. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1056

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 75, March 15 and 17, 1990, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1056.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 15 and 17, 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Basketball
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Subject. Geographic (TGN)
  • Knoxville, Tennessee
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 166 page document with half-page insert
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 7
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 75
File name champ_201306_035_072.jpg
Transcript (continued from page 68) enly passing to a man from the wrong team in the final seconds. Brown sat quietly in his locker room in the Superdome that night and politely answered every one of the thousand questions, sighing one time that, "When I threw it, I wished I had a rubber band so I could get it back." There was Indiana and Isiah Thomas beating North Carolina in 1981 in a strange, uncertain atmosphere of Philadelphia, only hours after President Reagan had been shot. There was Michigan in 1989, with an assistant named Steve Fisher, who woke up one day just before the championship to find himself the head coach. Just a few weeks later, Rumeal Robinson's free throws with three seconds left in overtime gave Fisher and the Wolverines an 80-79 title game victory over Seton Hall. "I'm the happiest man alive right now," Fisher said that night in the Seattle Kingdome. There was Lewis, the soul of frustration, clutching to his towel, clutching to his hopes, leading a Houston march into the Final Four three-straight years but never getting the championship. Minutes after his 1983 Cougars were doomed by the Charles dunk, he looked out at the world with sad eyes and said, "I feel awful." You want dynasties? It had dynasties. Maybe not the UCLA brand. In the modern world, with so many good teams and so many good players, John Wooden's achievements are now Fantasy land. But North Carolina and Georgetown each went 25-9 in the championship over the decade, powers as perennial as the tulip. Louisville was 23-6, Indiana 18- 7, Duke 18-7, Villanova 17-7. The faces changed, but the names at the top almost always stayed the same. "Consistency of our program," Louisville's Crum said one day, "is what makes me proudest." Indeed, Louisville might have been the most relentless power of them all, not only having four teams in the Final Four, but seven in the final 16. You want growing interest? Most of all, the 1980s had growing interest. No, not growing. That is too soft. Exploding. The numbers said it all, as far as the eyes could see. The nation's love affair with the sport was certified with a check in 1989, namely the one for $1 billion CBS paid to retain broadcast rights for the championship. It became routine to pack domes with 40,000 or more fans for the Final Four, and have to turn away 100,000 more requests. If there was not a game on your television on any given night during the winter, it probably meant your set was broken. Championship receipts were a combined $180 million for the first 47 years, and $224 million for the last four years of the decade. Average attendance for the championship game was 17,916 in the 1970s, and 31,248 for the 1980s. Virginia center Ralph Sampson was voted Associated Player of the Year three times during the 1980s. Press Championship television revenue was $23 million for the 1970s, and $282 million for the 1980s. There were 120 new arenas built in the 1980s. Division I basketball drew four million more fans last season than it did in 1980. Thirty-seven schools averaged at least 10,000 fans per home game last year. Three games had paid crowds of more than 60,000. What fed the public appetite? Television, for sure. So did the expanded tournament, and the noon-to-midnight drama it often supplied. And then, there were those two itsy-bitsy rule changes. They put up a shot clock, they painted a stripe for three-point shots, and revolution was at hand in college basketball. Scoring hit a 30-year low in 1982. The rulesmakers retired tc the lab, tinkered with their test tubes, and came out in 1986 with the 45-second shot clock. Stalls went the way of the Edsel. That sped things up a bit. But not quite enough. In 1987, the three-point shot was added. Bingo. No one dreamed the effect it would have, the rallys it would give birth to, the leads it would erase, the coaches' heart palpitations i! would cause. The little man was back in the game. No lead was invulnerable, nobody could be comfortable. By 1989, one of every five shots was a three-pointer. The public must have liked it. Division I attendance went up 1.3 million ir two years. The three-point shot, in fact, could stand as a symbol for college basketball in the 1980s. With its ability to surprise, to shock, to elate, to excite, it was the embodiment of the game that brought so many to the domes, brought so many to the television sets. Back in 1980, college basketball was thought to be pretty popular, a game maybe near its peak. How could we have ever guessed what the decade ahead had in store, from the personalities of the coaches to the heroics of the players to the fervor of the fans? And where o it stops, nobody knows. £ They play the game inside, and s that is the only reason there is a 3 ceiling on how high college basket- m ball can go in the 1990s. $ 72