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Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Page 63
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National Collegiate Athletic Association. Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 63. March 15 and 17, 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 31, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1046.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 15 and 17, 1990). Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 63. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1046

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 63, March 15 and 17, 1990, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 31, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1046.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 15 and 17, 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Basketball
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Subject. Geographic (TGN)
  • Knoxville, Tennessee
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 166 page document with half-page insert
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 7
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 63
File name champ_201306_035_062.jpg
Transcript Flying Dutchmen players are more than four decades younger than the fiery van Breda Kolff. (continued from page 58) a senior citizen, says he is still a young man at heart — and that serves him well with his players. "I've always been involved #with young kids, and I've kept up with them," he says. "I know their likes and dislikes and that helps me relate to them. "My track record has also helped me deal with the kids, too," he continues. "The first year I returned to Lafayette, and then, Hofstra, the players said, 'Hey, he's been successful, so we'd better listen to everything he says.' " He has won more than 400 games colle- giately, yet van Breda Kolff says he's more interested in preparing his players for life than he is in winning. "For the most part, my kids aren't going to be professional ballplayers," he says. "So, it's important I teach them something about life. For that reason, I don't believe in 'making' them weight train, attend study halls or the like. I prefer to tell them why they should want to do it. Then, if I have to, I 'make' them do it, though I'm not sure that's very effective. "My philosophy is this: we can't coddle athletes," he continues. "We can't take them by the hand and do everything for them, because that continues the spoiling process most of them have enjoyed since they were kids. Sometimes I say to the players, 'You'd better get married right after you graduate so you'll have someone to do everything for you, because you can't do it yourself.' "I try to get them ready for life by having them do things for themselves." Armstrong is also worried that a sense of perspective is being lost in college basketball. "I agree with (Seton Hall's) P.J. Carlesimo when he says, 'Coaches get too much of the credit when teams win and too much of the blame when they lose.' The players — the kids — that's what the game is for and what it's all about." Jack Armstrong Niagra "The essence of the game is kids, and how basketball should help them grow and mature," he says. "That's what it's all about — not so much wins and losses, averages and minutes played, but how you cooperated with each other, how you helped each other out — things like that." Neither van Breda Kolff, who is at the twilight of his great coaching career, nor Armstrong, just at the dawn of his, have any misgivings about their method of making a living. "No regrets," van Breda Kolff says firmly, "none whatsoever. Certainly, you look back over your life and you say, 'Why did I ever do that?' but then you realize that at that point in your life, the move was the right choice. And there's nothing I would have done differently." "I just wish," Armstrong says, "that people had a better understanding of what a coach goes through. I'm young, I'm a bachelor, so I experience no strain on my family life as a result of being a coach. But I've seen it happen to other guys, and it's a tough experience to endure — and to watch." In fact, Armstrong says, there's too much emphasis on the role of the coach. "I agree with (Seton Hall's) P.J. Carlesimo when he says, 'Coaches get too much of the credit when teams win and too much of the blame when they lose.' The players — the kids — that's what the game is for and what it's all about." Especially for men like Butch van Breda Kolff and Jack Armstrong, the oldest and youngest head coaches in Division I men's college basketball. $ 62