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Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Page 29
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National Collegiate Athletic Association. Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 29. March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 26, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1012.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association. (March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990). Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 29. University of Houston Sports Championship Publications. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1012

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds - Page 29, March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990, University of Houston Sports Championship Publications, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 26, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ/item/1144/show/1012.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Division I Men's Basketball Championship First & Second Rounds
Creator (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Publisher National Collegiate Athletic Association
Date March 15, 1990 - March 17, 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Basketball
  • College sports
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Knoxville, Tennessee
Genre (AAT)
  • programs (documents)
Language English
Physical Description 166 page document with half-page insert
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 2009-006, Box 7, Folder 7
Original Collection Athletics Department Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=412
Digital Collection University of Houston Sports Championship Publications
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/champ
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 29
File Name champ_201306_035_028.jpg
Transcript Sixteen Who Were Invincible Throughout the 51-year history of the NCAA championship, 16 teams entered the tournament unbeaten in regular-season play. Seven of those unbeaten squads completed the long haul with unblemished records. Listed below are the championship results of each of those teams: Championship Final Result Record Lost 79-71 to Illinois — NCAA first - round 23-1 Defeated Iowa 83-71 — NCAA championship 30-0 Defeated Kansas 54-53 (3 ot) — NCAA championship 32-0 Lost 70-65 (ot) to Cincinnati — NCAA championship 27-1 Defeated Michigan 91-80 — NCAA championship 30-0 Defeated Dayton 79-64 — NCAA championship 30-0 Lost 101-69 to UCLA - NCAA semifinal 31-2 Lost 91-72 to North Carolina — NCAA second-round 23-2 Lost 60-59 to Ohio State — NCAA second-round 28-1 Lost 90-47 to Villanova — NCAA regional championship 28-1 Defeated Florida State 81-76 — NCAA championship 30-0 Defeated Memphis State 87-66 — NCAA championship 30-0 Lost 92-90 to Kentucky — NCAA regional championship 31-1 Defeated Michigan 86-68 — NCAA championship 32-0 Lost 86-70 to Michigan — NCAA semifinal 31-2 Lost 75-64 to Michigan State — NCAA championship 33-1 Regular- Season Year School Record 1951 Columbia 23-0 1956 San Francisc 3 26-0 1957 North Caroli la 28-0 1961 Ohio State 24-0 1964 UCLA 26-0 1967 UCLA 26-0 1968 Houston 29-0 1968 St. Bonaventi ire 22-0 1971 Marquette 26-0 1971 Pennsylvania 26-0 1972 UCLA 26-0 1973 UCLA 26-0 1975 Indiana 29-0 1976 Indiana 27-0 1976 Rutgers 28-0 1979 Indiana State 29-0 Ah, but Taylor and Ohio State, with John Havlicek and Jerry Lucas, had already won the NCAA title in 1960. And McGuire and Marquette would win theirs in 1977. Knight's unbeaten championship team of 1976 was actually the extension of an even better team that was 31-0 on the season before being stunned by Kentucky in the regional final in 1975. History coughs up its perfect-record teams grudgingly. Five years after Columbia first made "unbeaten" part of the championship lexicon, San Franciso, coached by Phil Woolpert, led by Bill Russell and Jones, stretched a two-season victory string to 55-straight by beating Iowa, 83-71, for the Dons' second-straight title. Because of the 6-10 Russell's dominance — and, maybe, because none of them had HIM — Woolpert's fellow coaches voted to widen the three-second lane from six to 12 feet after that game. San Francisco's victory string ended at 60 with a resounding 62-33 loss to Illinois in the fifth game of the 1956-57 season. But another story with a perfect ending was in the making. To Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where transplanted New Yorker Frank McGuire had brought a team recruited from the sidewalks of New York. The Tar Heels went 31-0 when they beat Michigan State, 74- 70, in three overtimes in the national semifinals. That sent them up against Kansas in the final, setting up what would become a familiar scenario later in the NBA, Russell against Wilt Chamberlain. To tip off against the game's Goliath, McGuire sent up the runt of his litter, 5-10 Tommy Kearns. "Anything," said McGuire, "we could do to harass him would help." Then the Tar Heels sagged around Chamberlain. And sagged. And sagged. Chamberlain scored 23 points but North Carolina won, 54-53, when Joe Quigg made two free throws with six seconds left in the third overtime. In just two nights, Carolina played 110 minutes of basketball — the equivalent of nearly three games — and won two games and the national title. "What happened that year couldn't happen again in a thousand years," McGuire said. That depends on how you look at it. Starting in 1964, ending in 1975, UCLA won 10 national championships, four with 30-0 teams. History bows first to the 1964 Bruins, minus a starter over 6-5. Then to the 1967 team of Lew Alcindor, later to be the indomitable Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. It curtsies twice more to the 1972 and 1973 teams of Bill Walton. Most of all, it bows low to the grand architect of them all, Wooden. In the 15 seasons leading up to 1963- 1964, Wooden laid the perfect foundation. "I knew that 1963-64 team was going to be a good one," he says. Built around senior Walt Hazzard, it did not have a starter over 6-5. But it was skillful and quick and, most of all, supremely athletic. It had everything it needed to make the zone press — the famed and suffocating "Bruin Blitz" — work. Wooden had always wanted to use the press but never felt he had the personnel to do it. "Now, I felt for the first time I had the players that were just admirably suited for it," he says. "I knew we would be a strong contender. But, goodness no, I didn't think we would go through undefeated." Nor did he in 1966-67, with Alcindor, or in 1971-72 with Walton, or even in 1972- 73, when the Walton Gang brought Wooden his final unbeaten season and UCLA its seventh-straight title. Were there ever a season when Wooden thought his Bruins might tend toward the unbeatable, it was 1968 — the year Houston's Cougars figured THEY would be. The Bruins had beaten the Cougars and Hayes in the 1967 semifinals. That Bill Russell, San Francisco's dominating center, led the Dons to a perfect 30-0 season in 1956. 28