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The Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Page 92
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Berlin Iron Bridge Co.. The Berlin Iron Bridge Co. - Page 92. 1889. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 26, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/621/show/581.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berlin Iron Bridge Co.. (1889). The Berlin Iron Bridge Co. - Page 92. Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/621/show/581

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berlin Iron Bridge Co., The Berlin Iron Bridge Co. - Page 92, 1889, Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 26, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/621/show/581.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Publisher U.S.A: The Company
Date 1889
Description Pamphlet of the bridges built by the Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Iron and steel bridges
  • Iron, Structural
  • Iron and steel bridges Design and construction
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Physical Description 131 page pamphlet
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b5572449~S11
Digital Collection Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation provided by the citation button above. To order a higher resolution reproduction click Request High Res above.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 92
File Name aapam_201209_006dn.jpg
Transcript THE BERLIN IRON BRIDGE COMPANY, CORRUGATED IRON DOORS AND SHUTTERS—Continued. were all placed in exactly the same exposure, and the fires were lighted. It soon began to burn fiercely, but for the first half hour it did not show itself on any of the shutters, but so great was the heat the walls commenced cracking. The first signs of giving way under this severe heat was shown in about half an hour, by the wood shutter covered with tin, which commenced to emit smoke and wood oil through the holes in the tin where the latches and stays were bolted on. The corrugated iron shutters at this time showed no effect of the heat, except the single thick shutter, which became quite warm so that the paint commenced to smoke. The box door was so cool that a person could hold their hand on it. At the end of an hour, the wood shutter covered with tin, which had been for some time throwing off streams of smoke through the cracks, showed unmistakable signs of giving out, and had it not been for the heavy iron bands forming the outer frame, it would have fallen from its place. The single thickness corrugated iron shutter was, at the same time, so hot that the paint was all burned off, and the others began to show the intense heat by the burning paint on the outside, but still held their places, and beyond the burning paint showed no signs of distress. It now became evident that the wood shutter covered with tin could not withstand this severe heat much longer, and soon the flames were seen to eat through it at the top, showing that the inside cover of tin had been burned off, and the shutter, as a fire protection, was useless. The corrugated shutters held their places firmly and closely to the wall. At the end of three hours the fire had nearly subsided, and the shutters were all opened out for examination. On the inside of the wood shutter, covered with tin, a large hole had been burned through the inside covering, and when the shutter was opened, about one-half of the inside wood work dropped out, a mass of burned and charred wood. The shutter had been evidently held together by the wrought iron band about the outside, and the strap pieces forming the hinges which were all firmly bolted through and through with large washers inside—a form of construction which the superintendent informed us they alone use on shutters of this kind, and without which the shutters, no doubt, would have failed completely to do the duty. As it was, it came out of the fire in a very damaged and useless condition, while the corrugated iron shutters were, apparendy, as good as new, except the single thickness shutter, which was warped a very little on one lower corner, but not enough to allow the fire to leak through. The test was witnessed by several, but it is to be much regretted that it had not been more generally advertised, so that more of our large manufacturing companies, to whom fire proof construction is such an important item, could have been represented. The test was very satisfactory indeed, as showing merits of the corrugated iron shutters over the wood covered with tin, although for moderate exposure these latter stood a good test. The building with the shutters still attached is to be left standing, just as they now are, and parties interested in fire proof shutters can see them if they wish." EAST BERLIN, CONNECTICUT, U. S. A.