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The Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Page 51
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Berlin Iron Bridge Co.. The Berlin Iron Bridge Co. - Page 51. 1889. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 27, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/621/show/540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berlin Iron Bridge Co.. (1889). The Berlin Iron Bridge Co. - Page 51. Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/621/show/540

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berlin Iron Bridge Co., The Berlin Iron Bridge Co. - Page 51, 1889, Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 27, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/621/show/540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Publisher U.S.A: The Company
Date 1889
Description Pamphlet of the bridges built by the Berlin Iron Bridge Co.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Iron and steel bridges
  • Iron, Structural
  • Iron and steel bridges Design and construction
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Physical Description 131 page pamphlet
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b5572449~S11
Digital Collection Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation provided by the citation button above. To order a higher resolution reproduction click Request High Res above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 51
File name aapam_201209_006by.jpg
Transcript THE BERLIN IRON BRIDGE COMPANY, CONCRETE BRIDGES. FOR MANY years it has been the practice of engineers, when wishing a permanent bridge, to build a stone arch. Often stone arches have been built over streams where they contract the water-way so much as to cause great damage, and sometimes the bridge itself has been completely washed away. It is not always possible to get sufficient water-way for a stone arch, and it becomes necessary to use an iron bridge. Many towns and cities object to iron bridges on account of the wooden floor which it is necessary to renew occasionally, owing to decay and wear. After a large number of experiments during the past twenty years, we have succeeded in designing an iron bridge which overcomes the objection to a stone arch, viz: narrowing the water-way, and at the same time overcomes the great objection to any bridge with a wooden floor which will wear out. We have designed a bridge as shown in the illustrations on pages 51, 53 and 55, which has no wood work about it in any part to wear out or to decay. These bridges have now been in use in some places for over 15 years, without a single dollar being spent on them for repairs of any kind. They are in every way equal in wearing and lasting properties to the stone arch, and we see no reason why they should not practically last forever. The only possible objection to be urged, is that the iron work on the underside will occasionally require painting, but as the corrugated iron arches which we use are heavily galvanized especially for this class of work, we see no reason why these should not last indefinitely and never require painting. These corrugated iron arches used by us are much superior to buckle plate, notwithstanding buckle plate is thicker, for the reason that the vibration of the buckle plate tends to crack the concrete covering, and as soon as this cracks the bridge is ruined. In the case of the corrugated iron arch we have no such vibration, and even if the corrugated iron arch should rust out in years, we have a concrete arch remaining to carry the load of the bridge, which is amply sufficient. For small concrete bridges, up to 25-foot spans, we place the stringers lengthways of the bridge, as shown on page 51, resting directly upon the abutment. Between these stringers, and resting on the lower flange, we place corrugated iron arches, as shown in the cross section, and above the arch we fill in with concrete, The beams are fastened across the bridge by wrought-iron rods secured to the lower flanges, so as to keep the iron work in position while the concrete is being put in place. On the outside we put an ornamental lattice railing, as shown, securely fastened to the outside girder. On the top of the concrete covering we put a wearing course or pavement made of Trinidad asphalt. EAST BERLIN, CONNECTICUT, U. S. A.