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Continuous Tin Roofing
Directions for Laying our Continuous Tin Roofing
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Caldwell & Peterson Manufacturing Company. Continuous Tin Roofing - Directions for Laying our Continuous Tin Roofing. 1890. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 29, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/464/show/462.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Caldwell & Peterson Manufacturing Company. (1890). Continuous Tin Roofing - Directions for Laying our Continuous Tin Roofing. Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/464/show/462

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Caldwell & Peterson Manufacturing Company, Continuous Tin Roofing - Directions for Laying our Continuous Tin Roofing, 1890, Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 29, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/464/show/462.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Continuous Tin Roofing
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Caldwell & Peterson Manufacturing Company
Publisher Wheeling, W.Va.
Date 1890
Description A four-page booklet published in 1890 called “Continuous Tin Roofing” by “Caldwell & Peterson Manufg Company” based out of Wheeling, West Virginia. Content includes text on manufacturers, directions, and corrugated iron.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Roofs--Design and construction
  • Roofing--Installation
  • Roofing
  • Roofing, Tin
  • Roofing, Iron and steel
  • Sheet-metal, Corrugated
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • building designs
  • architecture
  • catalogues
  • interior designs
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Physical Description 4 page pamphlet
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpg
Original Item Location TH2455 .C35 1890
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b5576841~S11
Digital Collection Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Directions for Laying our Continuous Tin Roofing
File Name aapam_201209_001c.jpg
Transcript DIRECTIONS FOR, LAYING OXJR ContinucJusATin* Roofing. Unroll the bundle of roofing (arrow heads pointing down the roof); cut olf sufficient length of the roofing to reach from comb to eave, allowing one inch to be turned up at comb and one inch to be tnrned down at eave Commence at the end of building, turn down the outer edge of sheet and nail to face board. Turn up (with patent bending tool) one inch of the other side of sheet from comb to eave, Commence at the eave of the building to place over the edge of the sheet (which has been turned up) the caps with adjustable anchors (the anchors are the cleats which have punched nail ■? holes in them) and nail the anchors to the sheathing or raft- -= ers, Work up the roof from eave allowing each cap to lap •-.-.wi/..^ ^g^jfgj over the other about one inch, and be sure to have one of the aaaiaH^i anchors as .near the end of each section of cap as possible. ^^?~ Turn up with patent bending tool both edges of the next jpSB sheet from eave to comb and slip one of the turned up edges under the projecting part of the cap, which has been previously fastened down. Then place the bending tool (or a block) against the cap and with the wooden mallet hammer the sides close together, which finishes the standing seam. If your order ia for 20 squares, a cap seamer will be found in the tool roll, which if used in accordance with the printed directions (pasted on same) will close the cap more rapidly and make a smoother seam than can be done with the mallet. On the other turned up edge of the sheet place the cap and anchors as on the first sheet commencing at the eave and working up the roof to the comb, continuing in like manner until one side of the roof is Said. After completing all the standing seams onirae side of the roof, . then hammer down about six inches of each standing seam at the comb, and with the bending tool turn up the ends of the sheet one inch, on which turned up edges place caps, allowing them to overlap about one inch and nail the anchors to the ridge clear across the roof, the same as in the standing seams on the sides of the roof. Lay and fasten the sheets on the other side of the roof in the same manner as the first, allowing enough length for each sheet to slip up under the caps, which extend clear across the ridge of the roof (not failing to hammer down each standing seam about six inches from comb as on the first side of the roof) and then by hammering together the sides of the cap you form a complete finished comb in the same shape as the standing