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Modern Plumbing #10
Process of enameling the cast iron bath
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J.L. Mott Iron Works. Modern Plumbing #10 - Process of enameling the cast iron bath. 1921. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 25, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/167/show/124.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

J.L. Mott Iron Works. (1921). Modern Plumbing #10 - Process of enameling the cast iron bath. Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/167/show/124

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

J.L. Mott Iron Works, Modern Plumbing #10 - Process of enameling the cast iron bath, 1921, Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 25, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets/item/167/show/124.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Modern Plumbing #10
Creator (LCNAF)
  • J.L. Mott Iron Works
Publisher J. L. Mott Iron Works
Date 1921
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Plumbing fixtures--Catalogs
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Physical Description 50 page pamphlet
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2791382~S3
Digital Collection Architecture Retail Pamphlet Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/aapamphlets
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation provided by the citation button above. To order a higher resolution reproduction click Request High Res above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Process of enameling the cast iron bath
Description An outline of the enameling process.
File name aapam_201101_007ah.jpg
Transcript Mott Modern Plumbing Process of Enameling the Cast-iron Bath After the bath is cast, the enamel is applied. The hath is then placed in an enameling oven where it is subjected to about 1800 degrees (Fahrenheit) of heat H/NAMELED iron or porcelain enameled iron as it is usually called, is, as the name implies, iron castings which have been enameled. The sink, lavatory or bathtub as the case may be is first cast in iron, which is then ground smooth and a sizing coat applied, after which it is placed in an enameling oven, where it is heated until it turns a cherry red in color. It is then removed and the enamel applied, after which it is again returned to the oven where the enamel is allowed to bake. This operation is repeated several times until a smooth heavy coat of enamel has been applied. The fixture is then removed and permitted to cool. The bathtub has always been the most successful enameled iron fixture, when compared with lavatories and sinks, because it is not subjected to the same continuous hard usage. For this reason it is less likely to be stained or chipped. Enameled iron, however, is in no way comparable to solid imperial porcelain or vitreous china ware as the enameled surface is more porous and cannot be made as hard as the glaze applied to earthenware. For this reason it is considerably more difficult to keep clean, requiring constant cleansing after use. Manufacturing as we do both earthenware and enameled iron fixtures of which, by the way we are the oldest makers, it is not our object to condemn the use of enameled iron in connection with sanitary fixtures, but to point out its relative value as compared with earthenware.