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"What an Army!"
Page 1, front
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Geake, Robert C.. "What an Army!" - Page 1, front. November 13, 1943. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2014_006/item/96/show/92.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Geake, Robert C.. (November 13, 1943). "What an Army!" - Page 1, front. Mary F. Lopez Papers. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2014_006/item/96/show/92

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Geake, Robert C., "What an Army!" - Page 1, front, November 13, 1943, Mary F. Lopez Papers, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2014_006/item/96/show/92.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title "What an Army!"
Creator (Local)
  • Geake, Robert C.
Date November 13, 1943
Description A photcopy of an article titled "What an Army!", by Tech. Sgt. Robert C. Geake.
Donor Mary F. Lopez
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Civil rights movements
  • Mexican Americans
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Lopez, Mary F.
  • Lopez, Jose R.
  • Geake, Robert C.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • documents
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2014-006, Box 1, Folder 11
Original Collection Mary F. Lopez Papers
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=548
Digital Collection Mary F. Lopez Papers
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2014_006
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1, front
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2014_006_b001_f011_003_003.jpg
Transcript an ■*•&*.■■ Pat By Tech. Sgt. ROBERT C. GEAKE The Irrepressible Sergeant Geake, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, who has been amusing the customers from time to time during the past-few months, has sent us— by slow boat* apparently—another batch of memoranda, dealing with the vicissitudes of Army life. Sergeant Ceake is with the 5th Army, which recently fought its way into Italy, hut these letters were written while his outfit was still at its North African base. Our attitude la that If they had been written during the . Cavil "War they would still he joyous reading..yi ' —The Editors. TiffJ \)im www **ffaWwg«¥pi>wtff»»«*-iW-'<i>»M ) NOT be deceived. 'It m not difficult to be a J surgeon in the Army. All you need is an inborn reluctance to let soldiers alone and twenty-nine signs reading, Contaminated. -Army surgeons and normal people seldom see eye to eye. Over here in North Africa, for instance, they seem constantly to be at odds, with -the Array as to just who or what constitutes the eueray.. Obsessed with the happy faculty of being unable to see the war for^ the germs, they are apt to go bouncing around the front lines through machine-gun and artillery fire, shouting, "For heaven's sakes, stop this nonsense and get your mosquito bars on!" At Kasserine Pass they answered Rommel's dive bombers by distributing posters depicting a' contented-looking red-blue-and-yellow mosquito a foot long, and bearing in huge black letters the somewhat debatable proposition: As Deadly as a Stuka! Just so the boys wouldn't lose perspective. In the field, our pill rollers live in cycles. They go on wild shot crusades and will not rest content until every Sure lime TNTrVn<»"fWiiii«6Jirijrajjlffi iwiitffl soldier in the outfit has two sore arms. It's about time DOW for the teeth-inspection cycle. That will be some thing. All the dental surgeons of the 5th Array will rush frantically about with nttle sterilized sticks, looking into the mouth of everything front a cannon to a gift horse. Africa has been a windfall for the 'Medical Corps. In American camps, the docs had to be good to ■cars us with reports of flies seen loitering around the kitchen. Here they can simply exploit our own natural caution about drinking water and malaria. The policy of our unit surgeons on water is simple. Briefly, it is: "Go back! Go back! Can't you see? That's water!" To meet thai.grave emergency, our doctor hangs a Lyster bag out under a tree whenever we stop in the field. Tins is a large, canvas-rubber bag filled with chlorine, to.'which s little water has been added as a safety precaution. Itis white, bangs within a foot of the ground and has four nozzles near the bot- 11 in inii i ii iiiii null gia.'llTl'i After agooamng at the healthy life, drinking n^^rftg but puze'disin- fectants, most of us are ready to trade a slightly used surgeon and one Lyster bag foi a good swig of contaminated water. I think the surgeon is behind this mile-run thing too. At least it illustrates his policy: "Keep the boys fit if it kills them." ■ Every morning before breakfast we bring victory a Btep nearer by double-timing desperately over the African countryside in fatigues. At -.the head of the floundering column prances the pace setter—some minor-league Gunner Haegg in Ids middle twenties who can't appreciate that we elderly men in our late twenties aren't what we used to be. The only intelligent people out then are the Arabs, who stand at the side of the road and watch us. go by. For months Bow the surgeons have been making us take atabrine. Atabrine has something to do with malaria—probably causes it. Anyway, it i nines in lit-' DRAWINGS BY FLOYD DAVIS tie yellow pills, and no Army doctor can resist a piu, if someone else has to. take it. -' In our company we were introduced to atabrine at a Tunisian cork woods. There; was a kindly speech by the battalion surgeon and a beguiling talk by our company commander, who held up the. new pill in his thumb and forefinger so that all might see. We could hardly wait to take oar atabrine. Finally they let us line up—" No bucking the fine, men; there's enough for everybody"—and checked off our names. With the pill we received a canteen cup, brimful of cold lemonade, after which we all sat around on the ground and shot the breeze. Never were our relations with the Medical Corps more cordial.. Corporal Klornp sounded the keynote of the evening when he observed, "All tine and no malaria too." ■' | ''?*%.'■ I can, perhaps; suggest the deceit and treachery that scene represented in point of fact by noting for the record that today we take our **"^r>w*f* atabrine every Tuesday and Thursday evening or we go on a ten-mile hike- * 4 * One morning this past summer, a mighty troop convoy was steaming over the shining sea toward Africa. The vast armada was six Say* out of an American port, enjoying calm weather and an uneventful voyage. Suddenly the flagship ran smack into Private Chapman. This is the story of the incredible forty- «%h*!?bour#iil2«yfoaowed;' f" r '"'■ ~~ '--r^"- - That morning there appeared in the ship's mimeo- graphed newspaper, of which Private Chapman was the editor, the following anhouncement: "Sea fltnTripe will be issued tomorrow morning. Contact your first sergeant and be will give you permission to get some. Sea Stamps are invaluable on ocean-going mail." Immediately, the 8000 soldiers aboard were interested in sea stamps. First sergeants were besieged with questions and offered bribes. They, in turn, asked their officers, who were enthusiastic to a man, but as vague as anyone else. How much do they cost? Row do they work?' Where do we get them? Let's check with the editor. '■' *'*.^"■ *'_ v ," "• With thousands of soldiers clustered around loudspeakers, Chapman went on the air just before chow and answered most of the questions. The sea stamps would cost twenty-five cents. You fixed them on your letters in normal fashion. AH mail bearing sea stamps would be packed in special Backs and dropped off at" night at a secret mail buoy, where a fast patrol boat