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Excerpt from Del Pueblo
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Kreneck, Thomas H.. Excerpt from Del Pueblo - Front. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2014_006/item/62/show/60.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kreneck, Thomas H.. Excerpt from Del Pueblo - Front. Mary F. Lopez Papers. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2014_006/item/62/show/60

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kreneck, Thomas H., Excerpt from Del Pueblo - Front, Mary F. Lopez Papers, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2014_006/item/62/show/60.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Excerpt from Del Pueblo
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kreneck, Thomas H.
Description A photocopy of an excerpt from Del Pueblo by Thomas H. Kreneck, in which Mary F. Lopez is highlighted for her support in the creation of the Civic Action Committee.
Donor Mary F. Lopez
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Civil rights movements
  • Mexican Americans
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Kreneck, Thomas H.
Subject.Name (HOT)
  • Political Association of Spanish-Speaking Organizations
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Lopez, Mary F.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
  • Magnolia Park, Texas
Subject.Geographic (Local)
  • Second Ward
Genre (AAT)
  • documents
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2014-006, Box 1, Folder 20
Original Collection Mary F. Lopez Papers
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=548
Digital Collection Mary F. Lopez Papers
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2014_006
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Front
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2014_006_b001_f020_005_001.jpg
Transcript fodLGx*eJL£c T! riHE EXPANDED horizons of Houston's Latin American community took definite political shape in 1958. Until then most political observers con sidered the Latin American vote in Houston negligible, being relatively small and with little unity. In the summer of 1958, however, the Ciyjc Action Committee (CAC) was established. The CAC evolved from the support of Roy Elizondo, Alfonso Vazquez, E. _P. Leal, and Dr. Alff eao Hernandez-for the candidacy ul ■^. State Senator Henry B. GonzalezTor Governor of Texas. Gonzalez came to "speak in Houston and his vitality inspired these individuals to rally Houston Mexican Americans in support of his campaign. This nucleus of people enlisted the help of friends, relatives, and neighbors, and key figures from various community organizations including Mary Lopez, Al Matta, David Ortiz, and Koy Soiiz. Many""o"f"the men were veterans of World War II and Korea. The group was comprised of a mixture ot longtime noustonians and relative newcomers to the city. The CAC was truly a grassroots organization, resembling other spontaneous political groups coalescing in Mexican American communities across the Lone Star State. Its core membership consisted of twenty to thirty people and their families who met regularly in homes and in popular restaurants. Houston's CAC broke political ground in 1959 by holding several extremely successful fundraisers for Gonzalez during his energetic though unsuccessful bid for the state's highest office. These events involved husbands, wives, children, and other relatives, thus making the political process a family affair. Responding to the alarming reality that in 1958 only 1200 Latin Americans had paid poll taxes in Houston, CAC members launched a systematic poll tax drive within the Houston Mexican community during late 1958 and early 1959. They organized a group of over thirty people led by Alfonso Rodriguez, Walter Avalos, Genaro Flores, Ruth Valdez and Carmen Lopez. They concentrated their efforts in Magnolia Park, the North Side and the Second Ward, in such places as theater g) A^kr^/*/L^7) lobbies and food markets. On Saturday nights they V would mount the stage at local night clubs during the bands' intermissions to implore Mexican American audiences to pay their poll tax so that they could make their political will felt. They solicited at predominantly Mexican American Catholic churches on Sundays. In addition to advocating direct political participation of Latin Americans, early in 1960 the CAC joined with LULAC and the G.I. Forum to study and promote a free lunch program in the Houston Independent School District. Their action was sparked by a school board member's remark that Mexican American children did not need free lunches because they would rather eat "pinto beans". In 1960, the CAC became absorbed in the presidential campaign of John F. Kennedy. Enthusiasm for the candidacy of the charismatic, progressive, Catholic Senator was overwhelming among Mexican Texans. Because of their support for Gonzalez, the CAC leadership was contacted by state-level officials of the Viva Kennedy-Johnson Clubs in Texas to head a local effort in Houston. The CAC responded by establishing an office in Second Ward, and the Viva Kennedy-Johnson Club attracted many local Mexican Americans to its ranks. The club sponsored letter-writing campaigns, poll tax drives, bumper sticker brigades, telephone banks, and community get-out-the-vote rallies in support of the entire Democratic slate. These efforts incorporated both longtime Mexican American political activists and new participants in the political process. The momentum of the successful 1960 campaign led to the CAC becoming the Harris County chapter of the Political Association of Spanish-speaking Organizations (PASO) in October 1961, with Genaro Flores and John Castillo as chairman and vice-chairman, respectively. Roy Elizondo became district chairman of PASO and eventually state chairman. > Harris County PASO expanded its membership among the middle and working classes and held political functions of up to a thousand people. PASO members saw themselves as among the political vanguard of Texas Mexicans,