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The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933
Image 4
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The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 4. Winter 1933. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5763.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Winter 1933). The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5763

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 4, Winter 1933, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5763.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Winter 1933
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=373
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_003_004.jpg
Transcript THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Winter, 1933 Page 4 Bird Census Arrangements for This Year's Bird Census Are Already Under Way Our annual Christmas bird census for 1932 was taken on December 18th by a committee composed of Misses Kaiser and Beasley, Messrs. Clapp, Kiefner and Heiser. More than 76,000 birds, of 61 species, were listed in a tramp of twelve miles in the varied terrain near Cedar Bluff, on the San Jacinto river. Observation of special interest included an osprey, brown pelicans, woodcock, and a vast, seemingly endless flock of blackbirds coming into the swamps to roost. The complete report was published in Bird-Lore for January-February, 1933. Announcement of the date, the leaders and the complete plan for the 1933 Christmas bird census will be given to the daily papers in a few days. Anyone desiring to join a group should get in touch with one of the leaders. Information concerning "bird roosts," rare or strange birds and oddities of bird life or bird conduct will be most welcome to these enthusiastic "birders." Our previous Bulletins, and several Nature pamphlets recently distributed by the Club, have been sponsored by generous friends. It is pertinent to note that practically all expenditures from the Club's treasury are made in connection with the promotion of its more serious objectives, the expenses of hikes and other recreational affairs being borne by those who derive the pleasure and benefit therefrom. This is a logical policy, as many of our members are such because of the desire to foster, by their influence and support, conservation and educational programs in line with the purposes printed on the back of the Club's membership card and elsewhere in this Bulletin. Memorial trees: The Avenue of Magnolias along Buffalo Drive, sponsored by the City Federation of Women's Clubs becomes a fitting memorial to deceased members of the club. Eight trees were planted in 1932. A permanent record was made of the names of those to whose memory the Club paid tribute: Mr. Sigmund Westheimer Mrs. Annie C. James Mrs. Josephine Van Gaskin Padgett Mr. J. B. Leaman Mrs. Fannie Grainger Lidstone Mrs. Eliza De Lesdernier Mr. S. A. M. Harrison Miss Grace N. Worthing. A message of foresight and earnest, friendly counsel, is that of Lawrence H. Daingerfield to his Houston and Texas friends, published in this Bulletin. The Outdoor Nature Club has consistently advocated the dedication of adequate natural areas of every type, definitely and in perpetuity, for scientific, historical and aesthetic purposes. Large forest reserves, arboretums and wild life sanctuaries are available to many of the larger cities of the United States, but the idea has not yet received due attention in this part of the country. The picturesque bottom lands of the San Jacinto river and similar streams near Houston now offer the best opportunities to preserve for the population of our great future metropolis a fitting sample of the primeval nature of this section. The land .is cheap, held in large tracts, and still fairly primitive in character. Houston newspapers have urged the acquisition of these scenic junglelands for parks and preserves. This is a matter that should have the serious consideration of scientific institutions, civic groups and public-spirited citizens while there is yet opportunity to take suitable action. ff^M' To my friends of Houston and Texas: Ten years have passed since the writer first saw Houston, and only a few months since the city last faded from his eyes in the gray twilight and the horizon sinking toward the sea. During those years a deep and abiding affection filled my heart for Houston, the bayou hinterland, and all Texas, with her myriad people filled with Southern hospitality. Now that Texas has passed from my vision, I cannot resist a tendency to idealize a trifle, picturing in my mental eye all the loveliness of the primeval outdoors that was and still might be hers through all the years to come. We realize that much which might have been saved, to epitomize that which is primitive in nature, has gone on forever, yet there remain a few wooded lowlands along the winding bayous and rivers adjacent to Houston that could still be preserved and restored as Nature destined they should be, for thousands, maybe millions, yet unborn to look upon and enjoy, even as have you and I. One cannot look back over ten years of contact with Nature in Houston's environs and fail to feel many pangs of regret in realizing that much that was richest in scientific and historical value, loveliest in unspoiled beauty, has gone, never to be restored. The transition has been slow, so insidious, that many have failed to sense the loss. Yet this loss of that which might have been leaves all who cherish the great outdoors as if he were separated from his dearest friends. There is such a feeling of loneliness when one returns to his accustomed haunts and misses the old, familiar woodland faces which had long smiled upon him from green-mansioned aisles, that sometimes the wayfarer wishes he had never repassed that way. This is the fact that I want to impress on the many Houston friends before it is too late: Help to save as large a fragment of Nature in its pristine state as is possiK now. Do not wait longer, for there ^^ so little left completely unspoiled or e ^B partly intact from the hand of the Cr ^» tor that even now it is almost too law to secure that which may be restored as a haven for wild life, an arboretum for Dixie flora, and a place where Nature may be allowed to have her vagrant way, entirely uncivilized and untamed. Every bird, every flower, every leaf atremble on shrub or vine or towering tree, will unconsciously bless a Houston that will do such a glorious thing, such a glamorous gesture from a generous hand. The writer cannot now be accused of any selfish motive in encouraging action to save a real Nature sanctuary in the vicinity of Houston, for his work has called him far away, where he may not enjoy the contacts of such a haven. In his fond dreams he hopes to see just such a heritage, however, not only for the simple dwellers that may find their natural habitat therein, but for the people of Houston and Texas and her visitors through all the years to come. LAWRENCE H. DAINGERFIELD. COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN Program: J. W. Stiles, 1902 Bradsht ( Second National Bank Bldg., T. 9278. Outing: C. H. Kiefner, 2143 Sul Ross, 428 Esperson Bldg., C. 1696. Publicity: J. M. Heiser, Jr., 1724 Kipling, Texas Co., H. 8654. Hospitality: Miss Mabel Kaiser, 2359 Shepherd Drive, H. 6915. Conservation: Alston Clapp, Sr., 3718 Mt. Vernon, Anderson-Clayton, H. 3912. Art: Miss Tillie Schmidt, 2359 Shepherd Drive, H. 6915. Pictures: Miss Edith James, 3003 Travis, Kress Bldg., H. 0875. Membership: Miss Erna Giesecke, 1509 Courtlandt, V. 21188. Field Committee Bacteriology: Rex D. Frazier, 2602 Isabella, 1 Main Street, H. 6179. Birds: Miss Mabel Cassell, Public Schools, Great Southern Life Bldg. Conchology: Mr. Walter Westgate, 1015 Oliver, P. 5846. Fish: Bud A. Randolph, 24 Waugh Drive, T. 0668. Astronomy: L. H. Dangerfield, U. Weather Bureau, C. 6919. t Geology: Kenneth Hartley, Geologic Department of Humble Co., F. 3121. Taxidermy: Parham Haddon, 1110 Courtlandt, T. 8733. Flowers: S. J. Mitchell, Brazos Hotel. Animals: Hans Nagel, Hermann Park Zoo, H. 0568.