Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933
Image 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 3. Winter 1933. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5762.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Winter 1933). The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5762

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 3, Winter 1933, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5762.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Winter 1933
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=373
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_003_003.jpg
Transcript Winter, 1933 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Page 3 A Wasp Called Mud-Dauber (Continued from Page 1) this is necessary to guard against the prowling parasites, that may during the night intrude to mar my handiwork, or to menace the life of my young. ^ During the morning of the second day, Bshe reopens the cell by removing the 'mud plug of the day before, in which condition it remains until evening when she closes it again, and in like manner reopens it on the third day. In the meantime, the patient builder inspects very methodically with her antennae, the finished rooms, reinforcing with fresh mortar here and there, as she thinks necessary. It is now, however, on the afternoon of the third day that she stores one black spider with a gray stripe on its back as food for the as yet unborn wasps. Thus accordingly, and in similar manner, and in perfect sequence, the rooms or cells are built and provisions stored. The wasp lays her egg upon the body of the spider. The room is now closed, and permanently sealed to await the advent of her child. Spider Paralyzed, Not Dead The spider victim while entombed, and oblivious to the world about, is not dead ■n the usual sense. The sting of the wasp has only suspended animation, and halted its body functions to await the coming of the little white grub that will feed readily from its body. The wasp is equipped with a small hypodermic needle with which she paralyzes the nerve centers of the spider, rendering them, as it were, embalmed or refrigerated, with the sirloins and porterhouse steaks, fresh for her young as needed, with the vitamins intact and unimpaired. The species of wasp, now under observation, only store one spider to each room. The young wasps devour the body, legs and all. Wasps of some other families store three or more spiders to each room, with the young feeding only from the tender meat, leaving the shells or skeletons as mute reminders of the feast. After the spider is treated and safely stored away, the egg in due course hatches into the larva, which begins to feed almost immediately upon the spider. Another life is now on its pre-destined .way. f Husband Wasp Is a Mystery Little is known concerning Papa, or husband wasp, except, that he never showed up while the work was under way. He, like many other males of the insect world, doubtless reckoned his duty to society performed, upon his mating with the female of his choice. This mari tal embrace, perhaps, carried with it the penalty of death—so we see him no more. When Mrs. Wasp first began to build her home, I said to myself: "I will watch you carefully, as you continue to build. I will ask you many questions as you go along. Perhaps the secrets of a universe are wrapped up in you." It may be that a gleam of the intelligence back of it all may be caught, or some hint discovered of the wisdom of the master, who in the long ago, laid out upon the trestle board of life, the plans and specifications that were to guide the insect world throughout all the countless centuries. The first thought was: Who taught you to use so expertly the little mason's trowel with which you are equipped? Who told you about the trip hammer you have, which serves you in rounding the walls of your home and pressing them into such perfect symmetry ? What instructions have you had in the use of the poisoned dagger with which you so successfully paralyze your spider victims ? How did you find out where their nerve centers were located? Since you never saw your parents and listed to a mother's lullaby, what light of inspiration has gleamed so steadily out of the past to point the way to your life's high aim ? Since you will never see your offspring and hold them to your breast, what light of faith has burned so intensely along the way to assure you a springtime for your progeny ? Patience Is Incredible This radiant speck of femininity only seemed to give me a sly wink as she moved serenely on. I was amazed at her incredible patience, intrigued with her arts and sciences, and thrilled by her dexterity in the use of the tools of her profession. "I think of man's limitations in ferreting out your secrets; his remote and speculative conclusions concerning you- his theories advanced." From the viewpoint of the evolutionists, you are subject to a presupposal of varieties. You have a tendency by cause to depart from original family type. You become fit, only form functional disorders, as you overcome environmental change. Others say that your secrets are simply a sequence of cause and effect, or the inheritance of acquired characteristics. Others muse that your handiwork is one of organic selection, or merely a form of natural adaptation. No one seems to have measured the depth of these philosophical conclusions, nor indicated clearly the significance which the terms imply. After the day is done, however, and the observations are made, and the evidence is all in, we realize that we only detect tendencies and read symbols; sense forces and inquire again: "Out of the vast and colossal domain of the insect world, what is your part in the great plan of life ? For what specific purpose, little wasp, were you so wonderfully made ? To what end is your intripidity, and tenacity of purpose designed?" Cunning secrecy was her only answer, but for an instant I seemed to hear her say. Conjectures Unanswered "Somewhere out beyond the realm of mere pollinization of tree, and fruit, and flower, there are other things to be supplied. It is I, maybe, who adds to the maiden's soft blush tint upon the peach, to the bit of azure blue upon the plum. Or perhaps, I contribute to the fragrance of the jasmines' scented bush, or to the beauty of the lilies' cold bloom. Possibly, I add with my droning wings to the rhythm and to the cadence of the night songs that croon in the darkness." She hovered around for awhile and seemed happy that her desires of life had been realized, and that her work on earth was finished, contented that others would gather the fruits of her toil. The observer must watch intently now and listen, for the shadows are beginning to gather around the little mother. Soon, she will go away with the flowers and lay down with the autumn. (To be continued in next issue.) There has been a pronounced scarcity of reptiles, especially snakes, seen during the past year, according to reports of club members active in the field. In the case of copperheads and other venomous species, our exploring parties have accounted for some of the decrease, having disposed of every bad actor encountered. The disappearance of many harmless and interesting forms once common in this region is to be regretted, but is typical of the leveling process that reduces all nature to a flat, lifeless monotony wherever the unrestrained influence of civilization reaches. JjL.~.tV The following brief statement for 1932 was forwarded to the Audubon Association for inclusion with the reports of other affiliated clubs in Bird-Lore, Nov.- Dec, 1932: Activities have included: Cooperation with the Houston Museum of Natural History and other local, state, and national organizations, in educational and conservation work of varied scope; field trips for the observation and study of wild flowers, trees, reptiles, bird migration and nesting colonies of water birds; lectures before school classes and other groups; nature photography and photography exhibits; and seasonal bird censuses and bird-banding by members, including the first recorded banding of roseate spoonbills in America. The Club's Bulletin and special nature pamphlets were widely distributed. Our most important conservation work this year was the effecting of special warden protection for the nesting colony of roseate spoonbills and other birds on Vingtun Island, Galveston Bay, through cooperation of the National Association of Audubon Societies and the Texas Game, Fish and Oyster Commission. $rrt+