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The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933
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The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 2. Winter 1933. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5761.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Winter 1933). The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5761

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 2, Winter 1933, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5761.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Winter 1933
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=373
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
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  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_003_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Winter, 1933 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Organized, 1923 Affiliated with National Association of Audubon Societies Associated Outdoor Clubs of America OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OFFICERS FOR 1933 ALSTON CLAPP, SR., President. KENNETH HARTLEY, 1st Vice-President. JOE HEISER, JR., 2nd Vice-President. C. H. KIEZFNER, Corresponding Secretary. MABEL KAISER, Recording Secretary. RUTH BEASLEY, Treasurer. MABEL CASSEL, Custodian. JACK I. PULLEN', Auditor ERNA GIESECKE, Parliamentarian. LAWRENCE H. DAINGERFIELD, Honorary Vice-President for Life. BOARD OF DIRECTORS R. A. Sell, B. A. Randolph, R. D. Frazier, J. W. Stiles, Dr. A. J. James, Arthur Lefevre, Jr. Anyone interested in the objects of the Club may become a member upon presentation of signed application card, endorsed by two members and accompanied by membership fee for the current calendar year. MEMBERSHIP FEES Annual Member $ 1.00 Associate Member 5.00 Life Member 60.00 Correspondence regarding this bulletin may addressed to J. M. HEISER, JR. 1724 Kipling Street Houston, Texas Regular meetings of the Club are held in the Public Library at 8 P. M. on the first and third Thursdays of the month. The first meeting is principally for business, committee reports, display of specimens and photographs, and informal discussion. An educational lecture, exhibition, of nature films, or some other formal feature is usually planned for the second semi-monthly meeting. General Club outings are open to all members and to visitors who are willing to follow the few simple rules observed by all similar clubs. Arrangements depend upon such factors as available transportation, seasonal attractions at accessible points, and the wishes of Club members as developed at meetings. Special field trips are planned by groups engaged in research and conservation work, and the results of these expeditions are noted in the Club's records and given due publicity. OBJECTS OF THE CLUB To make stronger the bond of friendly understanding that exists among all lovers of Nature. To study our local flora and fauna and work for the preservation of all useful and interesting forms. Tc co-operate with other societies throughout the land in the work of conservation and observation. lo encourage Nature study, tree planting, and appreciation and protection of wild life among children and adults. To encourage hiking and interest in the outdoors as a source of health and inspiration. Bits of history, adventure and nature lore have been expertly blended and seasoned with a dash of sly humor in R. A. Selle's new book, "Luck and Alaska," now obtainable at Houston book stores. Whether you have been to Alaska or merely felt its spell from afar, you will find good reading in the pages of this attractive little volume. A „ Walking With Celebrities (Continued from Page 1) flatus, the warp and woof of poetry was woven—a lank, sharp-featured old man with long gray whiskers—but he did not speak to us. Friendly, talkative, bubbling Mrs. Miller showed us about the estate. Four people lived there, and each had a house. The poet had a two-room plantation- quarter house a little back from the road; at a generous distance farther back, Mrs. Miller's box cottage and her daughter's cottage stood side by side commanding a view of San Francisco Bay,—when there was no fog. Just back of the little private church was a two- room shotgun house, the abode of the poet's mother—it was a strangely scattered family—and eccentricity seemed to double-time in the arrangement of these living quarters, but it was the abode of a poet, a real poet. Who else could say: "All you can hold in your dead cold hand, Is what you have given away." Loye "Bird" Miller goes out to talk to the birds. We were at the edge of the city when he gave a low, querulous whistle followed by a metallic, "creek, creek." When this was repeated, an answer came from a big tree. After a few calls and answers, the bird came closer and even perched on a low bush. "Bird" gave the linnet call, and soon there was the linnet; then he called up the coast jay and brought two of them; the California towhee answered promptly,—in fifteen minutes, he had called up a purple finch, a linnet, a coast jay and a towhee. East Texas Ferns By ROBERT A. VINES The indigenous ferns of the East Texas area afford the nature enthusiast a fascinating study. Botanically the ferns are interesting because of their unique methods of reproduction. Propagation is augmented by the diverse arrangements of the sporangium, which serve also as the chief means for the identification of the species. Historically the ferns represent a group of plants whose ancestry is directly traceable to the giant ferns of the palaeozoic age. The cryptogamous, or flowerless, plants of that period differ but little from our present-day ferns. In fact, some botanists contend that all plants are descended from these spore- bearers of the primitive swamps. Aesthetically the ferns have few equals in the plant world. The wonderful symmetry and graceful bend of a fern frond is a sight ever to be admired. Although preserving their virtues in any environment, to be fully appreciated the ferns must be seen growing in their natural surroundings. Mr. Edward Teas, of Houston, owns a tract of land two miles north of Conroe, Texas, which is a perfect rendezvous for native ferns. He and the writer listed ten different species within a radius of one mile at this remarkable place. Members of the Outdoor Nature Club will be pleased to know that Mr. Teas is mak_^^ ing every effort to preserve this original^B bit of woodland and seeks only too glad^^' ly the approbation and help of interested people. The following list, arranged scientifically according to J. K. Small, gives the names of seventeen species of wild ferns which are most common in the East Texas area. Names marked with a star are those which are to be found on the Teas place, near Conroe: Filices—Ferns Order 2—Filicales Family 2—Osmundaceae (R.Br.). Cinnamon Fern Family Osmunda (L): O. cinnamonea (L), Cinnamon Fern* O. regalis (L), Royal Fern* Family 5—Polypodiaceae (R.Br). Fern Family Polypodium (L): P. polypodioides (L) A. S. Hitchcock, Common Polypody* Pteris (L): P. aquilina, var. caudata (L) Hook, Common Brake* Adiantum (L): A. capillus veneris (L)_, Southern Maiden Hair Cheilanthes (Swartz): ^& C. alabamensis (Buckley) Kuntzej^B Lip Fern ^^ Anchistea (Presl): A. virginica (L) Presl, Virginia Chain Fern Asplenium (L): A. resiliens (Kuntze) A. platyneuron (L) Oakes, Ebony Spleenwort* A. filiz-foemina (Swartz) Bernh, Upland Lady Fern* Lorinseria (Presl): L. areolata (L) Presl* Onoclea (L): O. sensibilis (L), Sensitive Fern* Polystichum (Roth): P. acrostichoides (Michx) Schott, Christmas Fern* Dryopteris (Adans), Shield Fems: D. thelypteris (L) A. Gray D. patens (Sw) Kuntze D. marginales (L) A. Gray Leathern Fern* Woodsia (R.Br.): W. obtusa (Spreng) Torr. In its attractive quarterly publication,. Wild Flower," the Wild Flower PreserJ vation Society, Inc., has an ideal means' of stimulating popular interest in our native plants, forests, and park areas. The January, 1933, number had a section headed "Conservation Ideas," in which was quoted a paragraph from the Outdoor Nature Club's Bulletin in regard to the establishment of nature reserves.