Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933
Image 1
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 1. Winter 1933. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5760.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Winter 1933). The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5760

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933 - Image 1, Winter 1933, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/5764/show/5760.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 3, Second Series, Winter 1933
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Winter 1933
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=373
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_003_001.jpg
Transcript <{& TOL^ 2- iuTt-J n^i-4— yX^J-^r^J^^r^i-J^^h^'H J*vy*£*-t>A h. ■ $y THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB of HOUSTON, TEXAS BULLETIN f alking With the Celebrities By R. A. SELL Alone with John Burroughs. "Yes. You lead but slow, leisurely." And "leisurely" we followed the narrow trail through the tangled alders that almost folded themselves against the ledges of vine-covered rocks. I say "alone" for John Burroughs did not feel the necessity of entertaining me, or anyone else. Not that he was unfriendly—far from it—but that he was preoccupied; he did not go to the woods to "gabble," especially when it was a new field—trees, ferns, birds, wild flowers, butterflies that were unusual, if not unfamiliar. He would look, listen, test the air, and in one instance, at least, he tasted a leaf to be sure that it was sweet bay. We came to the top of the first ridge where there was a considerable open • ace. "Let's rest our packs and look ut a bit." Posing on a dead limb, a lifornia quail, an aristocrat, a plumed Knight, was not nervous. "Don's had a bad night." Carefully, I trained my field glasses on the bird. But it was only after some explanations and a more careful survey that I was able to see what the great naturalist had noted at first: The bird was not standing erect, and the wing- shoulders were drooping slightly. Edwin Markham, the poet, famed for "The Man With the Hoe," was with a party who walked up the hill past the Greek Theater to see the crack in the ground made by the San Francisco earthquake. A small, frail man, white hair and beard, his eyes lit up; he took the bit of volcanic rock that I handed him and explained, "From the bowels of the earth, and this ledge might have dropped into the sea. 0 ye little men and little trouble! Earth is a big mill." Joaquin Miller was in bed. It was • rly noon; we had walked from the line in Oakland to the "Heights," yffle of the "Poet of the Sierras." While his wife held the door open, the poet looked at us, stared inquiringly, belligerently; in the poetic mood, propped up in bed, under the spell of the divine af- (Continued on Page 2, Second Column) PROPORTION By JUDD MORTIMER LEWIS I must go out every week or two Where fields are wide and the skies are blue, Where trees have spread out their boughs and made, A resting place in their cooling shade, Where bayous lie in the summer sun And little ripples awake and run Before each breeze, and where flowers bloom And weight the air with their sweet perfume. I must get out and sprawl out and lie Beneath a tree and see bits of sky Between the boughs, and must lie there long Where there are shadows and sun and song, And are butterflies and are honeybees, And see the purple of distant trees Across the plains, and hawks sail high On moveless pinions against the sky. I must do that every week or two To make the lines of my life run true; To step aside from the toil and fight For my daily bread, and to get the light Of distance and of perspective true On daily things which I know and do; That way all of life's hurts and stings Grow small and fit in the scheme of things. BLUEBONNETS By LUCILE D. GOODLETT Author of "Walk God's Chillun" Spring brought out a paint brush And softened it in dew, To splash her wide green palette, With a smear of feather blue, And not content with beauty, That was all too sweet to hear, She dipped it deep in In-di-an red And daubed it here and there, Then looking for a lonely place, To let her palette lie, She chose the lap of Texas Underneath an April sky. When Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Daingerfield left last summer for their new home in Los Angeles, a group of friends among the camera brigade presented them with an album full of pictures of people, places and natural objects familiar while they were our neighbors in Houston. The Club deferred official action until its annual meeting this January, when Mr. Daingerfield was, by unanimous vote, elected Honorary Vice President, for life. A Wasp Called the Mud-Dauber By CARL V. JARRELL A visitor arrayed in all her pristine beauty, came into my office recently. She was prim and precise. Her faceted eye sparkled with a vision of her destiny. Her ancestry dates back, perhaps, to the beginning of time. She is one of the more than three and one-half million species in the world, and a member of a society more numerous than all the other living things of Earth. She is a near relative of the family Pelopaeus Coeruleus, a female of the solitary variety and a builder of homes—a wasp called the mud-dauber. This sprightly creature first saw the light of day from the portals of a modest clay home, which her mother had builded for her children the season before. The time had now come when she, too, must do likewise, in answer to the eternal urge that was throbbing in her heart. She flew into my office through an open window, and casually inspected the premises. She selected a location for her home on the wall above my desk and presently began to build exactly as had countless others of her kind before her. For seven weeks she was to be my daily guest. She Begins to Build a Home This brown streak of animation loses no time in getting started. She selects moist earth that is suited to her needs, and adds to it a liquid cement which she exudes from her body as required. This mortar mixture is then fashioned into a ball about the size of a pea. This she carefully moulds into place in the construction of a room or cell as an individual nursery, and habitat for her offspring. The room is something more than one "inch long by one-quarter inch in diameter. About twenty-five loads of mortar are required to complete one room. The actual building time is three hours and is completed at exactly high noon each day. One end of the room is left open to dry and to season, until the evening shadows appear. The industrious worker, then returns to close the aperture as much as to say, (Continued on Page 3, First Column)