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The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935
Image 1
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The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 1. Spring 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1935). The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4138

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935 - Image 1, Spring 1935, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/4142/show/4138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Bulletin, No. 7, Second Series, Sping 1935
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1935
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=373
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_006_001.jpg
Transcript THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB of HOUSTON, TEXAS No. 7 Second Series BULLETIN Itide a Hobby and Defy "Depressions" By R. A. SELLE Hobby riders are happy people. Hobbies, like salvation, are free—free for everybody. The thrill of youth, gay, carefree, light-hearted; the elixir of an object in life—there is grandeur in a rugged landscape. Every man, woman or child needs at least one hobby. The sooner you learn to ride one, the sooner your eyes will be opened; you will wake up to the profound secret of worldly happiness and contentment. Without a hobby, you miss the real zest of life. When the hobby fits, it is more than a "•>rm of recreation; it is a kind of mind- \ urance, a safe and effective antidote r world-weariness, sadness of heart or loneliness of spirit; it gives you courage to face difficulties; no time for doubts or misgivings, no question as to whether life is worth living, no loss of confidence in men, or women; your best girl is not going to be taken by some other man; all things will turn out right. Prescription for nervousness, sleeplessness, loneliness, homesickness, any attack of "nerves": Get astride a good hobby and canter down the road to happiness, hearts as light as moonbeams. No dull days, no worries, no mooning over mistakes or lost opportunities. All is well. Everything is for the best. Riding a hobby, "sitting on top of the world!" You are astride the universe. A hobby can give you a melody that can put color and romance in a sandy waste, *urn a scorching desert into a paradise. | lect your mount. Start today. Culti- " ;e a keen and abiding interest in some Jier activity than your regular calling. You have something to live for, something to work for. Your outlook bears the rose-tinge of optimism, hope and faith. Your step is firm; you walk erect, chin up, eyes sparkling with keen interest; you are an important part in the scheme of things. Blessed is the comradeship of a well- groomed hobby. The Call of the South By FRANCES POINDEXTER There's a charm all its own in the Southland; There's a message that speaks without words In the gentle caress of the sunbeams And the pure, lilting notes of the birds; In the flowers that bloom so profusely, And the moonlight, so witchingly bright, That wooes with a sweetness insistent, And lulls with a sense of delight. There is friendship and trust in the Southland; There are hearts that beat loyal and true, With a sympathy helpful and human That is ready to reach out to you. All the hours are not wasted in striving After glittering baubles and toys; But a broader conception is given To life and its limitless joys. There's a vastness and breadth in the Southland That allures with its promises wide. There are memories, hallowed and tender, That awaken the patriot's pride. There's a something elusive, yet potent, That inspires to the heights yet unsealed, And that whispers a message of courage To the brother who thinks he has failed. Yes, a wonderful charm has the Southland, With her murmuring, moss-laden trees, Where the fragrant magnolia and jasmine Lend their perfume to each passing breeze; Where the broad fields of grain and of cotton, And the calm browsing herds, as they roam, All unite in a summons compelling To the land of contentment—and home. —From "All the Year 'Round." To a "Mocker" By THE VOICE OF THE VOICELESS Theo. D. Meyer "God's in His heaven; all's right with the world," sang Pippa in Browning's poem. It was Sunday, 4:30 p. m., March, 1934. In tune with nature, a mocking bird was singing his roundelay, as he sat on a slender branch of a green shrub at the (Continued on page 2) Texas-Panhandle Birds By MARILE LOCKHART Canyon, Texas Among the birds of the Texas Panhandle, none are more beautiful than the "tsipping" cardinal. In the very scenic Palo Duro Canyon he "tsips" with all his might. The lady cardinal seems to do the nest-building here, and Mr. Redbird assists by eagerly watching — a very charming and vivid flame amid the dark greenery reminds one of a blackish red rose. To his rather drab-colored mate he must be a sublime wonder as he sits on a twig singing gloriously a chorus of varied notes, his sweetest song. "In the dark foliage of the cedar tree Shone out and sang for me." Mr. Cardinal is a devoted father. How he cherishes his fledglings! Recently I had a lovely picture of him as he and his two youngsters played about the old well in the grounds of the Sam Houston old home at Huntsville. This was about the first of July, as I returned by automobile from a winter spent on Galveston Island, to my home in Canyon. Papa Cardinal was very excited over his two children. How grand he seemed to feel as he taught them the first rudiments of the sweet symphony of life. His blackish, flaming red coat contrasted noticeably with the softer tone-color of his offspring, who were for all the world trying to imitate the parent bird. Mrs. Redbird was nowhere in sight, though I'm sure she was finding food for them, and I could not wait for her return. It was a gorgeous picture, that portrayed a wonderful symbol I'll never forget. The bonnie bluebird—"Little Boy Blue" —comes for a while each spring in his flight to the south. He lingers long enough to form blue clouds in the white atmosphere of the plains. Woodland doves in their smoke-gray beauty are here for always. I have watched them among the elm and hack- berry trees, which are so thickly entwined with wild grape vine in the Can- continued on page 2)