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The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937
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The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 1. Spring 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3245.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1937). The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3245

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937 - Image 1, Spring 1937, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/3249/show/3245.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Bulletin, No. 6, Second Series, Spring 1937
Contributor (Local)
  • Boone, Charles B.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=373
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
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  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_005_001.jpg
Transcript THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB of HOUSTON, TEXAS No. 6 Second Scries BULLETIN SPRING 1937 Tarantula Versus Tarantula Killer BY OSWALD MUELLER Many interesting phases of insect life have been recorded which have not been observed generally by the amateur naturalist or layman. It often requires years of study, research and a certain amount of luck to enable one to be at the right place at the right moment to witness interesting, fascinating and intriguing happenings in the insect world. Usually it is luck which permits us to get a glimpse of the more intimate doings of our insect friends. At any rate, the writer attributes it to luck that he was permitted to witness a duel between a tarantula (Lycosa texanum) and a tarantula killer (Pepsis formosa). One evening while standing in one of *_e brilliantly lighted pavilions found ing the shores of Medina Lake, my at- \ ition was attracted to a very large " /antula which was slowly crawling toward me. Spiders are no particular friends of mine, for the bite of a very small and insignificant one had at one time put me to bed for three days. Upon seeing this huge spider coming toward me, I concluded that if the poison from the bite of a small spider was potent enough to almost paralyze me for a few days, the bite of a large tarantula could surely kill me within a few minutes. Many people believe this today, although it has now been definitely established, that the bite of the tarantula is not nearly so poisonous as was formerly supposed. Had I followed my first impulse, the tarantula would have been killed quickly, but I was interested in learning more about this insect, and thus I was permitted to witness a mortal combat, which, in relation to the size of the combatants, can be compared to the unequal battle between David and Goliath. The spider had approached to within a few feet of me, when suddenly a wasplike insect appeared. The tarantula sensed danger immediately, stopped sud- 'enly and then raised itself on its hind k 'S. This was the wrong thing to do I it exposed a vulnerable spot, the east. The tarantula killer was not slow »o follow up this advantage and it quickly plunged its long sting into it. Then it withdrew as quickly as it had appeared. The tarantula quivered, raised itself on its back pair of legs and began to thresh the air with its front legs, evidently expecting another attack. It was soon forthcoming, for the wasp returned shortly. However, it was more wary, dancing about and feigning attacks. The tarantula lunged viciously at its foe, but (Continued on page 2) We Need a Nature Sanctuary The need of a nature sanctuary for Houston can hardly be overestimated, not only to save from extinction the gradually disappearing flora and fauna of our region, but also for making a place which will attract and provide cover and protection for our wild life. While the San Jacinto River bottom and the Bay shore regions produce a feeling of sadness and regret in the hearts of those who loved their trails ten years ago, the trails still offer rich treasures to those who follow them now. Among the nature lovers of Houston there are those who have received national recognition for their work in Texas and there are others who possess wealth in money and land. The Houston Outdoor Nature Club, once a powerful organization, has survived the depression and is again showing signs of growth and strength. Somewhere there may be a group or an individual who can lead and organize those who are willing to contribute their time, talents or money to such an enterprise and so bring it to a realization before our vanishing species have become extinct. The officers of the club will appreciate any suggestions and comments from those who are interested in procuring a tract of land suitable for a nature preserve. Hikers Utilize Topographic Maps Mr. Louis Desjardins has been utilizing his set of the detailed topographic maps of Harris County of the U. S. Geological Survey, for exploring new prospective localities for Outdoor Nature Club trips. These maps show topography by contours having a one-foot interval, and show roads, houses and woods. Other members of the club have accompanied Mr. Desjardins on these hikes. A "beauty spot" was found (utilized for a club trip in November) along Green's Bayou about midway between the crossings of Goose Creek and Wallis- ville roads. Here there is a beautiful forest, deep ravines, and a high magnolia-crowned knoll commanding a mag- nificient view of the curving bayou both upstream and down with nothing to mar the forest beauty anywhere in the scene. Another location of unrivalled beauty was found in the San Jacinto river valley about six miles above Magnolia Garden at a body of water caller Silver Lake on the map. To get there required driving for miles along country roads and ranch lanes, and a hike through the (Continued on page 3) The "Swarming" of Turtles BY R. A. SELLE The annual "coming out" of the turtles furnishes a strange pageant that attracts a motely horde of Mexican egg- hunters, coyotes, lizards and snakes. About one-hundred miles south of Brownsville, Texas, on the coast of Mexico, the turtles come from almost the entire waters of the Gulf each year about June 1, in such countless numbers as to resemble a solid beach several miles long—of moving turtles. The location is well chosen because it has reefs along the edge of the water, where the little turtles may rush to safety from the fish—that is if they are lucky enough to get into the water alive. Turtles come out of the water to lay their eggs, and in such numbers as to literally cover the beach with their shells clicking against each other. Mexican egg-hunters frequently walk along on the backs of the turtles without touching the ground. Guided by instinct, a turtle pays no attention to people or coyotes, but with the most determined purpose finds a suitable place in the sand, digs a hole and deposits about seventy eggs. She carefully covers the nest with sand and conceals it by scratching up the surface of the sand surrounding it for several feet. Even while a man stands a few steps away watching, the turtle continues her work of concealing. But there are thousands of turtles; egg-hunters and coyotes may crowd around but from the great number, there will be enough to preserve the species. The beach is honey-combed with eggs; the egg-hunters dig carefully so as not to break the valuable eggs which are collected by thousands and rushed to Mexico City, Monterrey and Vera Cruz where they bring high prices as a delicacy in the leading restaurants and dining rooms. The coyotes get fat eating the eggs. The turtles slip back into the sea; in about three days, the beach is quiet again, except for the busy egg-hunters. SELECTS NATURE CLUB MEMBER Joseph M. Heiser, Jr., was elected to the Advisory Board of the National Association of Audubon Societies at their annual members meeting in October. The Board is composed of one member from each state in the Union. The Association refers questions applicable to bird distribution and condition of rookeries to their representatives and consults them on problems of conservation in their respective states.