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The Bulletin, No. 2, Second Series, Winter 1931
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The Bulletin, No. 2, Second Series, Winter 1931 - Image 1. Winter 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2102/show/2098.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Winter 1931). The Bulletin, No. 2, Second Series, Winter 1931 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2102/show/2098

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 2, Second Series, Winter 1931 - Image 1, Winter 1931, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2102/show/2098.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Bulletin, No. 2, Second Series, Winter 1931
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Winter 1931
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=373
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_002_001.jpg
Transcript THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB of HOUSTON, TEXAS BULLETIN WINTER 1931 . ^he Statelike Sphinx Moth f By CARL V. JARRELL 'During August, 1930, I undertook the study of the Sphinx Moth, this scintillating nocturnal having some days previously deposited her eggs upon an ivy vine which grew over the sides of my residence. Just how she knew about it and selected this particular vine as serving her purpose and how she knew her offspring, which she would never see, would feed readily from its leaves is something that has always intrigued the student of the insect world. Her parents in turn had traveled the long trail the summer before and therefore had imparted no information concerning these things. We first observed this child of the air and night as a beautiful egg, hatching into a green caterpillar which began almost immediately to feed upon the tender leaves which their mother had selected as suitable food when she deposed her eggs. We watched the growth ■ the caterpillar from the egg to matur- /. We saw them wax fat and shed their skins, with always a new and brighter skin underneath. Knowing that the inexorable law that governs these actions and determines their destinies was operating, I knew that the time of the miraculous change from the caterpillar to the larval stage or chrysalis was approaching. So we decided that the green creatures are now ready to begin their journey to their long winter home, having by this time grown to a size of about a man's thumb in diameter and about four inches long, changing in color somewhat to a rich golden brown. We were determined to find out, if possible, just the process of this _ transmigration, so accordingly there was prepared a box of suitable size into which was placed earth about six inches deep, knowing this particular moth preferred he dark caverns of the ground to the | inches of the trees or other places f ove. The dirt in the box was leveled off and pressed down perfectly smooth, and we were going to detect just where and how they entered. Over the top of the box was placed a fine wire screen. A caterpillar was placed inside with some ivy vine leaves for food, tacking down the cover so escape would be impossible. After the second night the caterpillar had disappeared, with no sign of exit, nor was there any trace or indication of (Continued on Page Two, Second Column) Bluebonnet Rhapsody By M. E. FOSTER The wild flowers made the landscape a glow of color no artist could ever put on canvas. There were great patches of bluebonnets, wild verbenas, yellow daisies, red wine- cups and pink and white primroses. Never have the bluebonnets grown so luxuriantly. In the distance we could see artists with paint and palette trying to put the picture on canvas. Impossible. How could one convey an idea of a symphony in blue amidst a brackground of every shade of green ? Onderdonk did it to the best of any artist's ability, but even the beautiful paintings he left the world do not portray the picture. Words cannot tell the story of those fields of bluebonnets. They are flowers that should not be picked and cannot be painted. Their coloring is elusive and changeable, all depending upon cloud effects, the rays of light that fall upon them and the background of trees and waving grass. Sometimes there are acres of them on broad prairies, and occasionally a splash of blue on the hillsides. We drove for miles and miles, for the farther we went the more beautiful did nature's adornment of the land appear to our eyes. On one side of the road there would be acres of blue flowers, nodding their beautiful little bonnets; across the way there would be purple verbenas, and then would come a stretch of yellow daisies. The red winecups, the pink and white and yellow primroses, the phlox and other wild flowers frequently would be intermingled. Those glorious wild things combine the shade of the clear sky and the turquoise, and seem to give a color that lingers between green and violet. Is that a blue, or is it just a bluebonnet ? Birds of Old Houston By BUD A. RANDOLPH On November 3rd, 1871, wild geese, duck, swan, brant and many other migratory game birds were flying south over 1214 Washington Avenue. Among them was a stork who dropped down into the bedroom and presented by parents with a nine-pounder. Yours truly let out a yell announcing that he would watch for the annual flight of the feathered folk for the next sixty years. My father at an early date began to teach me natural history, for which I am still an enthusiast. I will now point out where game of all kind abounded in the city limits as late as 1880. Where the Southern Pacific freight depot is located was a pond of four or five acres which abounded with aquatic birds of all kinds. At Washington and Houston Avenue I have trapped coons and opossums, shot quail, squirrels and rabbits. Houston Heights gave you deer, bear, turkeys, quail, and all fur-bearing animals indigi- nous to this section of Texas, including wildcats, puma, mink and otter. Where Montrose Addition stands was a series of sloughs and ponds and was a favorite shooting ground for snipe and ducks. On the prairies near Camp Logan wild geese, curlew, sand hills and whooping cranes, plover, were in abundance. In the persimmon swamps all around Houston were rookeries of herons of several varieties. Rails, black mallard and teal ducks spent their summers with us. The last flight of wild pigeons was in 1878. Their roosting place was in the forests of Houston Heights, where citizens of Houston went in wagons at night and destroyed thousands of them. Most of them were smoked and pickled for winter use. The invention of the breach loading shotguns, autos, and airplanes have made our feathered friends seek other fields for food, rest- and nesting and I presume that in the next century there will only be mounted specimens in museums to show what at one time gave plenty of food for all who cared to spend a few hours in securing enough for their own larders, and without the extermination of all our feathered friends. The wood duck, the prettiest plumed of all North America ducks, are almost extinct. The last I have observed are on a farm on Cypress Creek and have nested there for years. The owner of the farm protects them and will allow no shooting on his land.